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Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: hopkins ()
Date: February 17, 2019 05:33

Posted by: GasLightStreet
Date: February 16, 2019 16:48
Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
You are welcome indeed! Thanks!....
...regardless of their critical rating, certain songs, not having the heaviness of The Big 4 etc...Then again, maybe I'm just...
...I thought of the word "aspounding" but that may be wrong as well as maybe just being a fan of not everything Big is enough.
------------------------------------------------

ass pounding?



okaayyy....



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-17 05:39 by hopkins.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 17, 2019 18:36





Quote
rollmops
"Angie"is a great song; too huge for its own good but its beauty and its musical intricacies should not be diminished by its wide popularity; sometimes the mass of us get the good stuff!
Rockandroll,
Mops

I seriously think Angie is the best love song ever written! I hated it when it was released. Here's my story...

Honky Tonk Woman was by far my favorite song. I had been buying 45s of the big hits on the radio. I never paid any attention to the name of the recording artist. I was a little kid and I loved music.

I had all of the big hits from back then, everything from Mel and Tims "Backfield in Motion" to the Beatles "Revolution." I had grown-up on Bubble Gum Music, everything from "1, 2, 3 Red Light," "Keep the Ball Rolling," "Indian Giver," "Baby It's You" by Smith. Then "Honky Tonk Woman" became a big hit.

I used to list to AM radio night and day where they play all of the big hits every hour. I waited for the cow bell at the beginning of Honky Tonk to sneak up on me and the this force would come over me and give me the power of a super hero as Charlie's drumming put me in a trance. I felt power surge through me as I would dance around my basement room where I hung out. "Honky Tonk Woman" was the best song I had ever heard! I bought the 7" single and figured-out from the record label Honk Tonk was by the Rolling Stones. This was the band Pete who lived down the street liked. I didn't like Pete, so I didn't want to like the band he liked but, hey, I can't argue with a song that turned me on like no other.

I changed schools and made a new friend Vincent who loved the Rolling Stones. I went to his house one day and there were Rolling Stones posters covering his walls. Vincent's Mom made comments about the posters remarking that they were posters of Vincent's girlfriends due to their long hair.

I said to Vincent, "These posters are the Rolling Stones?" Vincent excitedly said, "Yes." Vincent wanted to share his love of the Rolling Stones with me his new friend. "This is the group that does "Honky Tonk Woman!" Excitedly he said, "Yes!" I exclaimed, "I bought the 45 of "Honky Tonk Woman" and wanted to find more songs by the Rolling Stones.

Vincent put Hot Rocks on the turn table. I wasn't very impressed at first. I had heard "Satisfaction" plenty of times but didn't know it was the same band as "Honky Tonk Woman." Then side three of "Hot Rocks" blew me away!

I got "Hot Rocks" that year from Santa Clause. How he knew what to get, I don't know since I had stopped writing him letters. The rest as we say is history. I wore-out "Hot Rocks" playing it over and over.

"Exile on Main Street" was released. My older brother bought it and didn't like it. He gave it to me. I didn't like it either except for "Tumbling Dice" which I loved. Vincent came to my house and saw Exile and and played "Sweet Virginia" over and over. He like, "scrape the shit right off your shoes." Bad words in a song were big when we were eleven-years-old. We'd let that side of the album play as we were doing other things and then play it again. I thought the album sucked but didn't realize that Exile, like "Goats Head Soup" and many other Stones albums are and acquired taste that take time to grow on people.

I grew to love "Hot Rocks." I loved the Rolling Stones. Many songs on "Hot Rocks" gave me that super power or as my elder aunt would say about certain songs, "It sends me." Kick-ass songs including the best version of "Paint It Black" (1986 Old Abkco - long version mono - most powerful), "Street Fighting Man," "Jumping Jack Flash"... the list goes on of songs then would 'send me' to another dimension and give me powerful dance moves. I probably looked awkward but in my mind I was cooler than Tom Cruse sing "Old Time Rock and Roll" in the movie Risky Business.

Oh yeah, "Angie." Then came 1973 and Vincent was telling me that the Rolling Stones had a new album released called "Goats Head Soup" and that I had to buy it right away. I agreed forgetting about how much I didn't like Exile (now my all time favorite album. Like I said, 'it's an acquired taste').

I made enough money for bus fare and to buy the new Rolling Stones album from working for my Uncle. After work and dinner, I caught the first bus and went and bought the album. I couldn't wait to get it home and spin it.

I ran all of the way from the bus stop to my house. Ran down to the basement. Mom yelled, "Aren't you going to say, 'Hello?" I yelled, "Hi, Mom," as I jumped down the last five steps.

I played Goats Head Soup. It sucked at first play. "What happened to the Rolling Stones?," I wondered. I heard "Angie" on the radio every hour on the hour all day long scrapping paint off my uncle's garage door all day and thinking, "What the @#$%& is this whiney song?"

I had proclaimed to the world, all of my friends that the Rolling Stones were the greatest band ever! They kick ass! They know how to make the best songs. They were much better than the Beatles! But, "Angie?"

"Angie" could be heard everywhere, over and over. My reputation was doomed. Where was "Street Fighting Man," "Jumping Jack Flash," "Gimme Shelter," "Midnight Rambler," Honky Tonk Woman" and all of the other great songs? We got "Angie" with Mick Jagger whispering? I want Mick to shout and scream and kill the king and rail at all his servants!

I went down to the corner where everyone hung out and we were head to John's house. His parents were away. I brought some records along including "Goats Head Soup." I loved "Star @#$%&" by then and thought it would be cool to play it for my friends who were in to the "Doors."

Johnny's older sister was having a party down stairs as we headed up stairs to Johnny's room for our impromptu party. Johnny's sister, Patty, said, "Can I see which records you have? Can we play some down here? For Patty, anything. She was the coolest girl around and everyone loved her. "Sure, Patty, you can borrow some records."

Patty spots "Goats Head Soup." She lets out a gasp and says, "The Rolling Stones! I love Mick Jagger and Keith is the coolest ever! IS this the new album with "Angie" on it?" I said, "Yeah, 'Angie is on it and "Star @#$%&" too!"

Patty grabs "Goats Head Soup" and wraps her arms around it, holds it tightly to her chest and says, "Angie" is the most beautiful song ever written. It makes me cry. It's such a sad and beautiful song. Nobody can let you feel a song like Mick Jagger can."

Wow! What just happened? The song that embarrassed me in front of all of my friends was suddenly cool. If Patty, the coolest chick around (she was in high school too!) thought it was cool, well then, my reputation was in tact. There must have been something to this new Stones song "Angie" that I missed. The radio sure loved it.

Suddenly I didn't cringe every time Angie came on the radio. I was proud that my bad, the Rolling Stones were number one! I didn't understand it at the time but I was glad Patty loved it in front of my friends and it was currently a big hit.

Patty's girlfriends loved it to. Linda excitedly said, "Put on Angie!" I didn't say a word to my friends. I felt very cool.

This was a tough crowd where i lived. Ray a greaser type with is combat boots, dungarees, big wallet in his back pocket hook on with a silver chain says, "We ain't playin' no Mick Faggot Lips." Patty walked over to Ray and started running her hand through his hair with her other arm security pressing "Goats Head Soup" against her chest and told Ray, "Honey, we're playing the Rolling Stones." Ray said, "I don't like the Rolling Stones!" Patty told Ray, we're putting it on!"

Ray looked at me and said, "You had to bring that shit over here. I don't like it!" I said to him, "You don't have to like. You just have to listen it to it." He came running towards me and I rand like hell up those steps with him yelling, "If you weren't Tommy's little brother I'd take you outside and beat your ass!"

We had side three of "Hot Rocks" blasting upstairs. I'd open the bedroom door and could hear "Angie" being play again and again.

After that episode I started listening to "Angie" on the album and listened intensely as it constantly played on the radio.

I started to realize that "Angie" was a great tragic song. It was beautiful. Emotional. Sad. Loving. Not only was it heart wrenching to know how much Mick loved this woman but he couldn't be with her anymore. He knew it. She knew it. The imagery in the song came through like no other song, "Everywhere I look I see your eyes." It was by far the greatest love of his life, "There ain't a woman that comes close to you." But there was no more lovin' in their souls. The relationship was over and Mick was telling Angie who probably had a hard time excepting the news. Mick had a hard time with it but he understood it and was moving on. He was just explaining it to Angie.

Mick understands that Angie is beautiful and hates the sadness in Angie's eyes but it was time to say, Good bye." He remembers how sweet Angie's kisses still tasted but he had to break-up anyway. All of the dreams they had together we're going to work-out. This song is the realization of a great love that did not work out and it was very hard to end it. He remembers 'all of the nights of crying.'

It was very touching as Mick whispers in Angie's ear, "Where will It lead us from here?" Where will life take them after their plans of their life together was over. There were clouds hanging over the relationship. It wasn't like it once was.

At the end of the song Mick admits he still loves her. It's simply heartbreaking.

I gave "Angie" many spins after the party(s) at Johnny's and Patty's house. I grew to understand what the world was loving about the new big Rolling Stones song, "Angie." "Heartbreaker" and "Star @#$%&" were soon tow of my very favorite songs as I was beginning to love "Dancing With Mr D."

I didn't mention how beautiful the music is on "Angie" and how perfectly it fits the song with violins, acoustic guitars, paino and Mick's emotional delivery. "Angie" is a perfect song. It's among the best love songs written. I haven't found a better, more emotional and heart-wrenching song.

Thanks, Patty and @#$%& you, Ray!





Angie Video:
[www.youtube.com]










TRACK TALK: Angie:
[iorr.org]



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-24 19:27 by exilestones.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 17, 2019 18:37


Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 17, 2019 22:40

Quote
GasLightStreet
Silver Train has a similar beat. The turn around is similar to All Down The Line as well. That's what people hear in terms of how they are similar. The melody isn't similar but there are similarities at times.

It's a good enough song, a little rocker, it moves, but it's a bit flat.


What is "it's a bit flat?" when talking about "Silver Train?"

Is Criss Cross Man flat? It seems flat to me.



++++++++++++++++



I appreciate everyone's input on IORR. Great group of people here.

I may know what's been said before on IORR and what you were thinking. I have been reading various Track Talks for Goats Head Soup songs. I collected many of the comments made about Goats Head Soup with more reading to come. There is unbelievably great insight here in to Goats Head Soup here on IORR. It would be cool to piece together a review and credit each member who is quoted, just like wiki.


I haven't hunted down Track Talk: Angie, yet. That's more.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Witness ()
Date: February 17, 2019 22:54

Your tale, exilestones, about your approach towards the Stones and about the particular songs that gradually made a special impact with you, was a pleasure to read!

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GJV ()
Date: February 18, 2019 12:20

Yes, exilestones, thank you for sharing your story. It was a fantastic read!thumbs up

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Marthijn ()
Date: February 18, 2019 13:23

Goat's Head Soup is a great album and so is TSMR (especially seen in the time it came out). I was under the impression that IORR is a Rolling Stones fan forum. But there are posting like these (the biggest let down, the worst song, the where much better in 72....) a bit too often IMO.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: silkcut1978_ ()
Date: February 18, 2019 15:44

I always struggled with this album - in fact I'm loving all the songs on it but I could never appreciate the whole album on it's own.

Untill...I changed the running order and replaced one song:

I even paid for a vinyl-cut with my favourite running-order and for me it works. What an album - Tattoo-like with a fast and a slow side:

Star Star
Criss Cross
Dancing With Mr D
Silver Train
Heartbreaker
~
Angie
Hide Your Love
Can You Hear The Music
Coming Down Again
Winter

Nothing against 100 Years Ago but that could have been a B-side as well like Through The Lonely Nights.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Spud ()
Date: February 18, 2019 16:42

It could be argued that the only thing GHS really needed was a few more loud & raucous guitars to give it a harder edge.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Turd On The Run ()
Date: February 18, 2019 17:07

I totally agree with you... I also struggle with this album in the sense that it could have been a stone-cold, epochal classic on the level of their many other masterpieces preceding it (and the few classic albums that they recorded following Goats Head Soup). The Stones, in the mid-1970's are a huge puzzlement to me because -- in popular mythology -- they hit a "creative nadir"... but in fact, if one listens to what they had recorded (not necessarily released) for/from these sessions (and those of It's Only Rock and Roll and Black and Blue) one can argue that these albums could all have been considered in their pantheon of masterworks.

Change the running order, replace some songs with B-Sides or later-released songs, and take some album cuts and relegate them to B-Sides... and suddenly their mid-70's "nadir" is an extended, spectacular peak.

For example... let's take Goats Head Soup... imagine this album in 1973 (using your concept of a fast side and a slow side):

Fast Side:
Dancing With Mr D.
Criss Cross Mind
100 Years Ago
Heartbreaker
Silver Train
Star Star

Slow Side:
Angie
Tops
Through The Lonely Nights
Coming Down Again
Winter
Waiting on a Friend

B-Sides:
Hide Your Love (a throwaway knock-about jam)
Can You Hear The Music (lovely... a perfect B-Side)

Now this Goats Head Soup is unarguably a masterwork.

One obvious proviso: If the Stones had done this... (and they should have) Tattoo You would not exist... but I would rather lose that album (or have them get off their asses in 1981 and record fresh material) and have all their mid-70's albums be the sparkling gems they should have been.

Diamond rings, Vaseline, you gave me disease, well, I lost a lot of love over you.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-18 17:15 by Turd On The Run.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: loog droog ()
Date: February 18, 2019 17:25

Quote
Turd On The Run


Fast Side:
Dancing With Mr D.


I never thought of Dancing With Mr. D as being fast.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 18, 2019 17:42

Quote
Witness
Your tale, exilestones, about your approach towards the Stones and about the particular songs that gradually made a special impact with you, was a pleasure to read!


Quote
GJV
Yes, exilestones, thank you for sharing your story. It was a fantastic read!thumbs up

I'm glad you liked the story. That night at the party cemented me in to "Angie" and "Goats Head Soup." When a lot of the older cool kids loved "Angie" and at the same time this new Rolling Stones song was nonstop on the radio airwaves (you couldn't get away from it - they still play it Wawa on a regular basis) I thought there is something great about this song "Angie."

If it wasn't for the showdown with Ray and Patty at the party, in front of the whole neighborhood, I (Angie really) would have never gotten the respect me and the Rolling Stones deserved. I stood up for my band and their new whiney ballad.

As the days went by and "Angie" filed the airwaves, I gave it a good listen. I wondered why so many people loved this song that had embarrassed me as I stones fan.

I realized the music was beautiful. I realized the music was romantic with the soft guitar and the string. I realized the song had class. Mick told his lover that he loved her dearly and he wasn't over it. I realized that Mick sang with emotion. I realized it was a great song.

Art works best when it stirs emotion. "Angie" brought feelings of being distraught, sadness, being in love and ending something special that had meant so much. It must have been very hard to end the relationship with Angie. The song would 'tug on my heart strings.' It would alter my mood. I came to accept "Angie" as a very powerful song. I started to understand why the beautiful but sad love story was the biggest thing of 1973.

I started to love "Angie" and still do very much. I gave "Goats Head Soup" many spins on my turntable in my basement room and had it on cassette too. I played it over and over. I loved "Star @#$%&" the first time I hear it and then "Angie" I grew to love. I didn't take long for "Heartbreaker" to become my new favorite song.

"Heartbreaker" was powerful music with our favorite narrator telling tragic New York City stories but I really fell in love with Mick Taylor's guitar solo. This when I first started becoming a huge Mick Taylor fan.

I had no idea who was Mick Taylor back then. I heard about Kieth Richards from Vincent and my other friend in my new school, Lee. I asked Vincent and Lee about Keith's guitar solo on "Heartbreaker." "That's Mick Tayor," they told me.

They explained how Mick Taylor had a flowing melodic style where as Kieth was more choppy like on "Sympathy for the Devil" on "Hot Rocks."

As time went on, I would pick out Mick Taylor on "Goats Head Soup" and loved his lead guitar solos on "Winter," "Sliver Train" and "Dancing with Mr D." I then started to really enjoy the whole album (except "Can You Hear the Music"). I started to become a huge Mick Taylor fan.

"Mr D" grew on me. I started to like the story about down in the graveyard having tryst with the devil. "Dancing with Mr D" became one of my very favorite songs. I'd always put it on my homemade favorite Stones songs cassette tapes along with "All Down the Line," "Stray Cat Blues," "She's a Rainbow," "Citadel" and many others.

Yes, I became a Mick Taylor fan through "Goats Head Soup!" "Goats Head Soup" turned me in to a huge Stones fan. "Angie" had became for me one of the greatest songs ever along with "Heartbreaker" and "Star Star." I'd play "Goats Head Soup" over and over searching for and enjoying and bit of Mick Taylor lead guitar on that album.

I had many friends who would rave about Led Zeppelin and Jimmy Page. I had the Rolling Stones and Mick Taylor. I had no idea at my young age how important Keith was to the Stones.

As I've read comments on IORR thread about how "Goats Head Soup" was a let down for some fans after the the several great albums that came before GHS, I was surprised. I think "Goats Head Soup" is among the greatest.

"Goats Head Soup"was essentially my first Rolling Stones album. I had the "Honky Tonk Woman" single, then ""Hot Rocks" ("Hot Rocks" doesn't count as an album since it's a greatest hits) and then "Goats Head Soup." "Exile on Main Street was floating around but never really gave it a chance at first since I did't really like it. I dismissed that album.

I was surprised to learn that some big Stones fans didn't like "Dancing with Mr D" as an opener and some didn't really like the song that much. I was shocked!

People compared "Goats Head Soup" to other Stones albums and thought "Goats Head Soup" should have had a stronger, ass-kicking opener like the previous group of albums did. To my dismay big time Stones fans here on IORR constantly compared "Goats Head Soup" to a few albums that came before it. I really didn't understand why people wanted to compare "Goats Head Soup" to "Sticky Fingers" for example. They were two totally different things and different periods in the Stones lives. One has nothing to do with the other.

"Goats Head Soup" was a period in the Stones career just like "Let It Bleed" and "Exile." It's similar to a master artist who paints and the different periods they go through. Maybe they master painter was having a 'blue peroid' whereas in "Goats Head Soup" Keith was having a wah-wah period and Charlie was having a hit the high hat and quickly silence it with his foot petal period. There are different characteristics in "Goats Head Soup" that make it fit together as an album. "Let It Bleed" has it's own characteristics. The differences between "Between the Buttons" and Their Satanic Majesties Request" characteristics. Comparisons between Stones albums can go on and but the differences are more important. This is why the (to me any way) why the Rolling Stones are great musicians because they keep changing while usually staying true to their roots (among many other reasons).

The point is that "Goats Head Soup' was the Stones "Goats Head Soup" period, I love that period and it's very special to the band in musical styles and to me as a Stones fan.

I am very fortunate to have "Goats Head Soup" as my first real Stones album because I didn't have other albums to come before it to compare to or be disappointed like when I first hear "Love You Live" and it wasn't another "Get Yer YaYas Out."

If "Goats Head Soup" was a palette of paints from an artist it would be their amber (color), sad dark (melancholy) period. It's a special sound. It's a special period for the Rolling Stones and I certainly have no complaints about it. I can't compare "Goats Head Soup" to any other Stones album. It's "Goats Head Soup!"

As far as "Goats Head Soup" having a different opener than "Dancing with Mr D?" WHAT!! "Dancing with Mr D" is not only a great Rolling Stones song but it is the best choice to set the mood for the album.

I've seen people propose a different track list for "Goats Head Soup" and I can see why they pick a different running order or want to add in "Though the Lonely Nights" or "Criss Cross Man" but I don't agree with it. We don't need to make "Goats Head Soup" another "Sticky Fingers." It's "Goats Head Soup!"

One thing was pointed out in the various IORR comments is that people say the "Star Star" doesn't really fit "Goats Head Soup." I never realized it. That is probably true. "Through the Lonely Nights" would be a better fit with the instruments and mood of "Goats Head Soup" but I probably won't like "Goats Head Soup" as much without "Star Star." It was a good way to end the album.

With "Goats Head Soup" being my first Rolling Stones album, I could enjoy it for what it is, a beautiful period in Rolling Stones music with no other influences clouding my judgement of a fine alum.



photo by David Baily

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 18, 2019 17:45

Quote
Turd On The Run
I totally agree with you... I also struggle with this album in the sense that it could have been a stone-cold, epochal classic on the level of their many other masterpieces preceding it (and the few classic albums that they recorded following Goats Head Soup). The Stones, in the mid-1970's are a huge puzzlement to me because -- in popular mythology -- they hit a "creative nadir"... but in fact, if one listens to what they had recorded (not necessarily released) for/from these sessions (and those of It's Only Rock and Roll and Black and Blue) one can argue that these albums could all have been considered in their pantheon of masterworks.

Change the running order, replace some songs with B-Sides or later-released songs, and take some album cuts and relegate them to B-Sides... and suddenly their mid-70's "nadir" is an extended, spectacular peak.

For example... let's take Goats Head Soup... imagine this album in 1973 (using your concept of a fast side and a slow side):

Fast Side:
Dancing With Mr D.
Criss Cross Mind
100 Years Ago
Heartbreaker
Silver Train
Star Star

Slow Side:
Angie
Tops
Through The Lonely Nights
Coming Down Again
Winter
Waiting on a Friend

B-Sides:
Hide Your Love (a throwaway knock-about jam)
Can You Hear The Music (lovely... a perfect B-Side)

Now this Goats Head Soup is unarguably a masterwork.

One obvious proviso: If the Stones had done this... (and they should have) Tattoo You would not exist... but I would rather lose that album (or have them get off their asses in 1981 and record fresh material) and have all their mid-70's albums be the sparkling gems they should have been.


I like your work. You make "Goats Head Soup" a whole different album. I can't picture "Waiting on a Friend" on it How about "Slow Talkin' Fast Walkin"" at the end?

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: liddas ()
Date: February 18, 2019 18:13

Quote
exilestones

...

Mick understands that Angie is beautiful and hates the sadness in Angie's eyes but it was time to say, Good bye." He remembers how sweet Angie's kisses still tasted but he had to break-up anyway. All of the dreams they had together we're going to work-out. This song is the realization of a great love that did not work out and it was very hard to end it. He remembers 'all of the nights of crying.'

It was very touching as Mick whispers in Angie's ear, "Where will It lead us from here?" Where will life take them after their plans of their life together was over. There were clouds hanging over the relationship. It wasn't like it once was.

At the end of the song Mick admits he still loves her. It's simply heartbreaking.




Always read Angie's lyrics the other way round: it's the lady, Angie, wants to dump her man because things weren't going as expected (the usual "no money in our coats", therefore "no lovin' in our souls"), the man denies the reality and/or romantically believes that love is all you need ...

I find that usually the bridge is the key of the song, and Angie's bridge is

Angie, I still love you baby
Everywhere I look I see your eyes
There ain't a woman that comes close to you
Come on baby dry your eyes


C

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: boogaloojef ()
Date: February 18, 2019 19:58

Quote
Turd On The Run
I totally agree with you... I also struggle with this album in the sense that it could have been a stone-cold, epochal classic on the level of their many other masterpieces preceding it (and the few classic albums that they recorded following Goats Head Soup). The Stones, in the mid-1970's are a huge puzzlement to me because -- in popular mythology -- they hit a "creative nadir"... but in fact, if one listens to what they had recorded (not necessarily released) for/from these sessions (and those of It's Only Rock and Roll and Black and Blue) one can argue that these albums could all have been considered in their pantheon of masterworks.

Change the running order, replace some songs with B-Sides or later-released songs, and take some album cuts and relegate them to B-Sides... and suddenly their mid-70's "nadir" is an extended, spectacular peak.

For example... let's take Goats Head Soup... imagine this album in 1973 (using your concept of a fast side and a slow side):

Fast Side:
Dancing With Mr D.
Criss Cross Mind
100 Years Ago
Heartbreaker
Silver Train
Star Star

Slow Side:
Angie
Tops
Through The Lonely Nights
Coming Down Again
Winter
Waiting on a Friend

B-Sides:
Hide Your Love (a throwaway knock-about jam)
Can You Hear The Music (lovely... a perfect B-Side)

Now this Goats Head Soup is unarguably a masterwork.

One obvious proviso: If the Stones had done this... (and they should have) Tattoo You would not exist... but I would rather lose that album (or have them get off their asses in 1981 and record fresh material) and have all their mid-70's albums be the sparkling gems they should have been.

I'm not much of a fan of Through The Lonely Nights. I would either leave Hide Your Love, add Fast Talking Slow Walking or use Short And Curlies another Goats Head Soup outtake used on It's Only Rock 'N' Roll instead.

I believe there was an early acetate that contained Criss Cross Mind and Through The Lonely Nights and omitted Coming Down Again and Winter.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-18 20:04 by boogaloojef.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: February 18, 2019 20:15

Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
Silver Train has a similar beat. The turn around is similar to All Down The Line as well. That's what people hear in terms of how they are similar. The melody isn't similar but there are similarities at times.

It's a good enough song, a little rocker, it moves, but it's a bit flat.


What is "it's a bit flat?" when talking about "Silver Train?"

Is Criss Cross Man flat? It seems flat to me.

Criss Cross is a bit flat as well - but a better song. Tepid is another word that would've fit with Silver Train. Or a bit lifeless. Perhaps one of their earliest 'going through the motions' sounding song.



++++++++++++++++



I appreciate everyone's input on IORR. Great group of people here.

I may know what's been said before on IORR and what you were thinking. I have been reading various Track Talks for Goats Head Soup songs. I collected many of the comments made about Goats Head Soup with more reading to come. There is unbelievably great insight here in to Goats Head Soup here on IORR. It would be cool to piece together a review and credit each member who is quoted, just like wiki.


I haven't hunted down Track Talk: Angie, yet. That's more.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: February 18, 2019 20:16

Quote
hopkins
Posted by: GasLightStreet
Date: February 16, 2019 16:48
Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
You are welcome indeed! Thanks!....
...regardless of their critical rating, certain songs, not having the heaviness of The Big 4 etc...Then again, maybe I'm just...
...I thought of the word "aspounding" but that may be wrong as well as maybe just being a fan of not everything Big is enough.
------------------------------------------------

ass pounding?

okaayyy....

No, not ass pounding. It's a word that, it may not be "aspounding", it's probably something close to that that I can't think of, that means something like 'striving to be'.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Deltics ()
Date: February 18, 2019 20:23

Quote
GasLightStreet
Quote
hopkins
Posted by: GasLightStreet
Date: February 16, 2019 16:48
Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
You are welcome indeed! Thanks!....
...regardless of their critical rating, certain songs, not having the heaviness of The Big 4 etc...Then again, maybe I'm just...
...I thought of the word "aspounding" but that may be wrong as well as maybe just being a fan of not everything Big is enough.
------------------------------------------------

ass pounding?

okaayyy....

No, not ass pounding. It's a word that, it may not be "aspounding", it's probably something close to that that I can't think of, that means something like 'striving to be'.

Aspiring?


"As we say in England, it can get a bit trainspottery"

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: MrMibbs ()
Date: February 18, 2019 21:58

Quote
potus43
Great review. Agreed is is one of their best
Better than Egypt Station ?

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: February 20, 2019 19:11

Is this what you meant to do?

Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
Quote
exilestones
Quote
GasLightStreet
Silver Train has a similar beat. The turn around is similar to All Down The Line as well. That's what people hear in terms of how they are similar. The melody isn't similar but there are similarities at times.

It's a good enough song, a little rocker, it moves, but it's a bit flat.


What is "it's a bit flat?" when talking about "Silver Train?"

Is Criss Cross Man flat? It seems flat to me.

Criss Cross is a bit flat as well - but a better song. Tepid is another word that would've fit with Silver Train. Or a bit lifeless. Perhaps one of their earliest 'going through the motions' sounding song.



++++++++++++++++



I appreciate everyone's input on IORR. Great group of people here.

I may know what's been said before on IORR and what you were thinking. I have been reading various Track Talks for Goats Head Soup songs. I collected many of the comments made about Goats Head Soup with more reading to come. There is unbelievably great insight here in to Goats Head Soup here on IORR. It would be cool to piece together a review and credit each member who is quoted, just like wiki.


I haven't hunted down Track Talk: Angie, yet. That's more.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Toru A ()
Date: February 27, 2019 06:33

Quote
exilestones

Hi Toru A, May I contact you?

Hi. Most photos are of Music Life magazine Feb 1973.
FYI, see below thread.
[iorr.org]

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Date: February 27, 2019 16:56

In a weird way I think "Dancing w Mr D" is the key track on GHS. Not because it is great or important, but it is the one that seems to determine many opinions and stances on this album. It's an odd track because of the medium tempo. When one investigates Keith's tempos, you realize that this is one of the several core factors about the Stones - that they actually play fairly slow. "Mr D" trudges along. And most importantly in regards to the album: it is the opening track. So it sets the tine, and we never really seem to get around it because , even when criticizing the song - it doesn't work well anywhere else. Or maybe I should say: from the GHS sessions it is the only song that emerges as a reasonable opener.

I never had a problem with "Angie". Loved it from the get-go. "Silver Train" and "Angie" on TV were literally the first time I saw the Stones in motion. So there was no way I could dislike any of it.

I agree on some re-sequencing; that it makes the album stronger. One of the big head scratchers is why oh why did they leave "Criss Cross" off? Probably that one instead of "Hide your Love".

One other issue with GHS is that the guitars are not recorded very well. The Mastering and EQ. There is something really muted about them. I think "Heartbreaker" and "Silver Train" really suffer from that. With "Train" it may be that its an older track too; so maybe some generation loss was in play. But "Heartbreaker" should have been sizzling hot, but neither Keith's guitar, nor the horns, the clavinet - nothing burns at all.

Coming on the heels of "Exile" it suffers by comparison. But in the overall catalog for me it is a stellar album. "Goats Head" and "Undercover" are two often overlooked master albums.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: 35love ()
Date: February 27, 2019 17:32

In Rich Cohen’s book (Sun Moon RS)
He writes ‘Angie’ was written by Keith in a hospital bed.
To me, both parties know the relationship is not good, living on the bottom rungs, break up.
I have never cared for the song, nor do I play it, yet was mesmorized by it live in Paris 2, 2017.
The vocal and guitars were exquisite, just beautiful.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: February 27, 2019 18:06

Quote
Palace Revolution 2000
In a weird way I think "Dancing w Mr D" is the key track on GHS. Not because it is great or important, but it is the one that seems to determine many opinions and stances on this album. It's an odd track because of the medium tempo. When one investigates Keith's tempos, you realize that this is one of the several core factors about the Stones - that they actually play fairly slow. "Mr D" trudges along. And most importantly in regards to the album: it is the opening track. So it sets the tine, and we never really seem to get around it because , even when criticizing the song - it doesn't work well anywhere else. Or maybe I should say: from the GHS sessions it is the only song that emerges as a reasonable opener.

I never had a problem with "Angie". Loved it from the get-go. "Silver Train" and "Angie" on TV were literally the first time I saw the Stones in motion. So there was no way I could dislike any of it.

I agree on some re-sequencing; that it makes the album stronger. One of the big head scratchers is why oh why did they leave "Criss Cross" off? Probably that one instead of "Hide your Love".

One other issue with GHS is that the guitars are not recorded very well. The Mastering and EQ. There is something really muted about them. I think "Heartbreaker" and "Silver Train" really suffer from that. With "Train" it may be that its an older track too; so maybe some generation loss was in play. But "Heartbreaker" should have been sizzling hot, but neither Keith's guitar, nor the horns, the clavinet - nothing burns at all.

Coming on the heels of "Exile" it suffers by comparison. But in the overall catalog for me it is a stellar album. "Goats Head" and "Undercover" are two often overlooked master albums.

EOMS is supposedly muddy - but GHS is.

Which I like.

It may be the reason you hear what you hear is partially because of the equipment it was recorded on in Jamaica but perhaps the rooms and humidity.

Mr D is an excellent LP opening track. It sets the tone for the album. GHS has its own sound - and definitely its own vibe, which I've always liked. Keith's riff for Mr D is an excellent combination of Drive My Car and what he played for Satisfaction in 1969-70, how it boogied live. It's simple yet, to my ears, it has an intimidating aspect to it (something he figured out one more time with Love Is Strong in open G).

Something I've always liked about Mr D is that it doesn't ever change, it's the same thing throughout.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 28, 2019 03:34

Quote
Toru A


Hi. Most photos are of Music Life magazine Feb 1973.
FYI, see below thread.
[iorr.org]



Quote
Toru A
For Jamaican Recording Loverssmiling smiley





















All the photos taken by Koh Hasebethumbs up

Thanks for the link to the Music Life photos.

I searched high and low to find these photos above.
Which magazine are these photos above come from? I would to have high quality flat scans of these. They are rare and awesome! Thanks!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-28 13:03 by exilestones.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: February 28, 2019 03:39

Great shots … have seen a few of them before ….

and cool to see Keith and Charlie using an
Australian made Holden car to get about in …..

ROCKMAN

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Toru A ()
Date: March 4, 2019 10:27

freshly excavated.





Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Toru A ()
Date: March 4, 2019 14:44

Excerpts from the interview with Mick on the magazine above:

Originally recording of the new album was scheduled in Los Angeles
but the American Federation of Musicians objected to over two weeks recording by the British Musicians.
It's strange, but Jethro Tull could do that. That made us angry.
Then, we moved to London and we came here in Kingston accoding to Marshall Chess's suggestion.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 4, 2019 17:40

Great posts! Wow! Great pics! THANKS!

Toru, you are the King of the Kingston pics! RS 1973 JAMAICA! Thanks again!

It's amazing you have all of these unbelievable rare pics from the days of Goats Head Soup in Jamaica. Why did Japan get all of the great pics from Jamaica '72?
The photographer must be Koh Hasebe for all of the pics.

I'm glad Goats Head Soup was recorded mainly in Jamaica and not in LA. It gives the album a little more mystique, Mon.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-04 17:45 by exilestones.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 4, 2019 18:01

Koh Hasebe, Japan’s top rock photographer from the Sixties through
the Eighties, photographed The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin Official,
U2, Queen, Aerosmith and other legends all over the world. Check out our
exclusive gallery below, drawn from his photo archive, with commentary from Hasebe
and some of his famous subjects.

Rolling Stone [www.rollingstone.com]



The Rolling Stones In Kingston Jamaica
Rolling Stones in Kingston Jamaica with classic instruments of Japan n, Jamaica,
Photo by Koh Hasebe

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