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Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 25, 2019 04:07


Promo Poster 1973

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Date: January 25, 2019 07:50

Quote
exilestones

Promo Poster 1973

Came with the album.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 26, 2019 01:30

Quote
DandelionPowderman


Came with the album.

In the 1973 in the USA we got a cardboard insert of the goat's head in the soup picture. We didn't get the above paper poster with the name of the album printed on it. We also got the censored Star Star.



Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 26, 2019 01:40

How the hell do you follow up an album like “Exile on Main Street?”

You don’t.









The 1972 critically acclaimed Exile was and is still today considered The Stones at their finest.
So, no big surprise most critics were to say the least, slightly disappointed with the follow up “Goat’s Head Soup.”
Released in 1973, Goats Head was a more polished production than the raw and ragged Exile.
It reflected the resurgence of soul-pop and the rise of funk, while maintaining the Stones’ distinctive rock sound. It spawned the hit single “Angie”, possibly its best known track, and topped the charts in both the US and the UK.

At the time of release, Jagger said, “I really feel close to this album, and I really put all I had into it… I guess it comes across that I’m more into songs. It wasn’t as vague as the last album which kind of went on so long that I didn’t like some of the things. There’s more thought to this one. It was recorded all over the place over about two or three months. The tracks are much more varied than the last one. I didn’t want it to be just a bunch of rock songs.”

Preceded by “Angie” as the lead single, which sailed to #1 in the US and became a worldwide hit, Goats Head Soup was released in late August 1973 and also shot to #1 worldwide. The Rolling Stones’ autumn 1973 European Tour followed soon after, in which three slots in the set list were given to the new material. (The popular bootleg recording Brussels Affair would result from this tour.)

Critical reaction to the album was varied at the time. Bud Scoppa called the album “one of the year’s richest musical experiences” in Rolling Stone, while Lester Bangs derided the effort in Creem, saying, “There is a sadness about the Stones now, because they amount to such an enormous ‘So what?’ The sadness comes when you measure not just one album, but the whole sense they’re putting across now against what they once meant…”

Goats Head Soup is now generally considered to have marked the end of the Stones’ “golden age”, with Stephen Thomas Erlewine saying, “Sliding out of perhaps the greatest winning streak in rock history, the Stones slipped into decadence and rock star excess with Goats Head Soup… This is where the Stones’ image began to eclipse their accomplishments, as Mick ascended to jet-setting celebrity and Keith slowly sunk deeper into addiction, and it’s possible hearing them moving in both directions on Goats Head Soup, at times in the same song.”[4] While it is generally considered to lack the energy and spark of their previous few releases, Goats Head Soup has endured as a popular seller and has gone triple platinum in the US.

The album cover was designed and photographed by David Bailey, a friend of Jagger’s who had worked with The Rolling Stones since 1964. The portrait of Jagger on the front cover was approximately life size in the original 12 inch LP format.

The sessions for Goats Head Soup were abundant with outtakes. Two of these – “Tops” and “Waiting on a Friend” – would surface on Tattoo You in 1981, and feature Mick Taylor on guitar; “Through the Lonely Nights” became the B-side to the “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)” single and was released on CD for the first time on the 2005 compilation Rarities 1971–2003.



The super rare “Goat’s Head Soup” store display.

[garyrocks.wordpress.com]

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: 35love ()
Date: January 26, 2019 01:53

Awww, the pretty pictures make me like the album even more...not!
Goat Head Curry, eesshhh.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: January 26, 2019 02:40

Quote
exilestones
How the hell do you follow up an album like “Exile on Main Street?”

You don’t.


The 1972 critically acclaimed Exile was and is still today considered The Stones at their finest.
So, no big surprise most critics were to say the least, slightly disappointed with the follow up “Goat’s Head Soup.”

Critical reaction to the album was varied at the time. Bud Scoppa called the album “one of the year’s richest musical experiences” in Rolling Stone, while Lester Bangs derided the effort in Creem, saying, “There is a sadness about the Stones now, because they amount to such an enormous ‘So what?’ The sadness comes when you measure not just one album, but the whole sense they’re putting across now against what they once meant…

Lester Bangs should've been put away. I could see that mentality riding in 1986 with that ridiculous album but not 1973. What a hack.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Deltics ()
Date: January 26, 2019 03:03

NME September 8, 1973.




"As we say in England, it can get a bit trainspottery"

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: January 26, 2019 04:18

Quote
exilestones
The 1972 critically acclaimed Exile was and is still today considered The Stones at their finest.
So, no big surprise most critics were to say the least, slightly disappointed with the follow up “Goat’s Head Soup.”

Speaking of critics, via timeisonourside.com:

REVIEW EXCERPTS


History has proven it unwise to jump to conclusions about Rolling Stones albums. At first Sticky Fingers seemed merely a statement of doper hipness on which the Stones (in Greil Marcus' elegant phrase) rattled drugs as if they were maracas. But drugs wound up serving a figurative as well as a literal purpose and the album became broader and more ambiguous with each repeated listening. At first, Exile on Main Street seemed a terrible disappointment, with its murky, mindless mixes and concentration on the trivial. Over time, it emerged as a masterful study in poetic vulgarity. And if neither of the albums had eventually grown on me thematically, the music would have finally won me over anyway. Now Goats Head Soup stands as the antithesis of Exile - the Stones never worry about contradicting themselves - and it is a wise move, for it would have been suicidal to Exile's conceits any further. Compared to the piling on of one raunchy number on top of another, Soup is a romantic work, with an unmistakable thread of life-affirming pragmatisms running through it. It is set apart not only from Exile, but every past Stones' LP, by its emphasis on the ballad.... The Stones succeed because they rarely forget their purpose - the creation of rock & roll drama. It is for that reason that they can move from the snow-white Americana of Coming Down Again into the urban R&B of Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) without the batting of an eyelash—theirs or ours. When they are uncertain of their purpose - as on Dancing With Mr. D. - they can be hopelessly silly. That track is the weakest opener ever so positioned on one of their albums, and they've never performed with less conviction... There are too many secondary songs on Goats Head Soup to rate it an ultimate Rolling Stones album. The content-defying title expresses the group's uncertainty about its performance. But... three great ballads place the album among their most intimate and emotionally absorbing work. At the same time, @#$%& maintains the stature of the Stones as grand masters of the rock & roll song. If they've played it safe this time, their caution has nevertheless reaped some rewards. Soup stands right next to Mott, the thematically similar LP of the Stones' brightest students, as the best album of 1973. For me, its deepening and unfolding over the coming months will no doubt rate as one of the year's richest musical experiences.
- Bud Scoppa, Rolling Stone, November 1973


Last year he was singing about what he looks like this year. It sounded better than it looks. Just like Jagger on the Goats Head Soup album cover, the filmy scarf or whatever it is making him look sorta like Judy Garland in Meet Me in St. Louis... don't like that smile, it's just vacant... who is this guy anyway... and inside Charlie and Bill no longer likeable, but not even interestingly unpleasant... the whole thing is just pretentious, Mick Taylor is a big @#$%& obviously trying to look bad, amoral, like early Lou Reed or something.... But that's not their image anymore, Mick. What is? Nothing. Nondescript fabulousness... There is a sadness about the Stones now, because they amount to such an enormous So what? The sadness comes when you measure not just one album, but the whole sense they're putting across now against what they once meant... Just because the Stones have abdicated their responsibilities is no reason we have to sit still for this shit! Because there is just literally nothing new happening. Bowie is a style collector with almost no ideas of his own, Reed's basically just reworking his old Velvets ideas, people like Elton John are reaching back into nostalgia but that's a blind alley, and everybody else is playing the blues. So unless we get the Rolling Stones off their asses IT'S THE END OF ROCK 'N' ROLL!
- Lester Bangs, Creem, December 1973


Sure, I was as full of nervous anticipation as you were. Every new Stones album has to plow through such expectations that the Second Coming would flop first hearing. Witness mass turnabouts re Exile... Maybe, for all its pleasures, that's what drags you about this album: its air of resolute complacency. Much of Mick's singing simply lacks the intensity of yore, and the album isn't ABOUT much. The Stones are still consummate entertainers, but somewhere along the line we began to expect something more than entertainment from them. In Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed, the Stones began to tell us what was going on... And that's what missing in this very durable record. And beneath that knowledge is the wonderment at how that durable expertise carries on in the face of disintegration. The Rolling Stones are no longer a quintet but now such a perfect corporation that you don't even think to complain when you get expert sax solos instead of Keith's lowslung, lunging forays. A lot of covering up going on, and they're good at it, so Keith's fade and the Stones' cruise into future muzak doesn't hurt at all. You expected more, you won't again. Gotta be disappointed, but you gotta rationalise yourself into love too, 'cause you're a trooper. So are they. So what?
- Allen Crowley, Creem, December 1973

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-26 04:19 by Hairball.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: rollmops ()
Date: January 26, 2019 16:46

Who is Mr. D?

Rock and roll,
Mops

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: powerage78 ()
Date: January 26, 2019 16:50

All the albums with Mick Taylor are good.

***
I'm just a Bad Boy Boogie

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: 35love ()
Date: January 26, 2019 17:07

Quote
rollmops
Who is Mr. D?

Rock and roll,
Mops

The Devil. Pleased to meet you.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: runrudolph ()
Date: January 26, 2019 17:58

Quote
rollmops
Who is Mr. D?

Rock and roll,
Mops

Death.
Jeroen

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: TravelinMan ()
Date: January 26, 2019 18:11

I agree, it’s death (Grim Reaper); 99% of the references have to do with death and dying. I think the reviewers at the time confused everyone with their incorrect take.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: lem motlow ()
Date: January 27, 2019 08:26

Quote
TravelinMan
I agree, it’s death (Grim Reaper); 99% of the references have to do with death and dying. I think the reviewers at the time confused everyone with their incorrect take.

Yes and thank you-

I’ve been pointing this out to people on the internet for years many who have a higher opinion of the song after learning what it’s actually about.
Until I began talking with other Stones fans online I had never even met anyone who thought this tune was anything less than a masterpiece,but it turned out there were many who thought it was a comic book version of sympathy.actually listening to what the Stones are playing and singing helps a great deal.
Dancing with Death-looking down a 44,getting poisoned by a snake,spider or drinking belladonna will surely get you a trip down to the graveyard.
He even cleverly mentions the “hand of death”

Lately I’ve seen mentions of Jagger or Taylor playing the rhythm guitar which is laughable.That riff is Keith down to its core.he just walks that thing ,slowly letting it hang and then punctuating it at the end when Charlie closes the hi-hat.
Charlie and Keith working that groove and Bill snaking the bass line through it while Taylor comes over the top with that slide, it’s just amazing.
To be honest,When I see people saying they don’t like this song I really wonder if they’re just putting me on.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: 35love ()
Date: January 27, 2019 08:57

Putting you on Lem, no way.
I saw this ‘Dancing With Mr. D’ in Nanterre/ Paris 2 NO FILTER right up close to Mr. Richards himself
[m.youtube.com]
Devil, death, dance.

Re: GHS Stones Most Biggest Letdown?
Posted by: Witness ()
Date: January 27, 2019 12:11

Not having listened to the album lately, I try an assessment of individual songs as seen from this moment.

Dancing With Mr. D --- 8,5/10
100 Years Ago --- 8,5/10
Coming Down Again --- 10*/10 ( that is, 10 pluss one star)
Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) --- 9/10
Angie --- 10/10
Silver Train --- 6/10
Hide Your Love --- 5,5/10
Winter --- 9/10
Can You Hear The Music --- 10/10
Star Star --- 6,5/10

I have appreciated "Silver Train" and "Hide Your Love" higher in isolation from the album though, when I have happened to come upon them.

Even if the album in my opinion is not so good as its predecessors, it is still an album dear to me. Both in parts and even more as whole.

I agree with Dandelion's suggestion to merge this thread with the Album talk thread. Even another earlier thread might preferably have received that treatment.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-27 12:12 by Witness.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: KeithNacho ()
Date: January 27, 2019 12:30

An absolute masterpiece. I declare myself goatsheadsouper once again.
And if you add Tops, Waiting and Through the lonely.................... wow

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 27, 2019 23:57


Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: January 28, 2019 07:15

I dig that they used the original logo only in all white.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: rollmops ()
Date: January 30, 2019 21:13

Reading again Life , I noticed Keith mentioning the studio Dynamic Sounds where GHS was recorded with Mickey Chung. Keith says the place was equipped with four-track; that seems very minimalistic for the Rolling Stones circa 1972/73.

Rockandroll,
Mops

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: January 31, 2019 00:38

Here's the best I can do for ya rollmops....


In 1963 Jamaican Byron Lee purchased the
West Indies Records Limited (WIRL) studios from Edward Seaga….




ROCKMAN

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: rollmops ()
Date: January 31, 2019 02:45

Thank you Rockman; I was very surprised by how Keith described the studio where they recorded GHS on page 339 of his book; 16 track sounds more like it.
Rockyouaretheman.

Rockandroll,
Mops

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: OpenG ()
Date: January 31, 2019 17:45

I wish there was some old session footage of GHS sessions I would of loved to see them in studio doing Dancing With MR D and the rest

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: TravelinMan ()
Date: January 31, 2019 20:28

If I recall, Taylor said he and Richards wrote Seperately in France. So maybe they decided to record it in Jamaica? That would make sense because Hopkins was there in Jamaica as well.

It also surprises me to see Hopkins play on Star. Would have expected Stewart on that number.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exhpart ()
Date: February 1, 2019 22:34

Well ...if this thread has done nothing else it made me dig out GHS and give it a listen again. It will always have a special place for me as my first Stones album. Today standout track was Coming Down Again probably change tomorrow but Coming Down Again is wonderful. Delicate piano and lyrics that for the fan actually mean something as Keith sings about Anita

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 2, 2019 13:27

"Coming Down Again" is a song by the Rolling Stones featured on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup. It is sung as a duet by Keith Richards and Mick Jagger.

Credited to Jagger/Richards, "Coming Down Again" is largely the work of Richards, who went as far as to say "'Coming Down Again' is my song" at the time of its release. A slower ballad similar in mood to another track on the album, "Angie", the lyrics tell of Richards' relationship with then-girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, who had chosen to abandon her romantic liaison with his friend and bandmate Brian Jones in favour of one with Richards.

Share your thoughts, there's nothing you can hide
She was dying to survive
I was caught, oh, taken for a ride
She was showing no surprise

Slipped my tongue in someone else's pie
Tasting better ev'ry time
He turned green and tried to make me cry
Being hungry, it ain't no crime[1]

The song opens with Stones recording veteran Nicky Hopkins playing keyboards alongside a fluid, prominent bassline performed by Mick Taylor. Guitars are performed by Richards, who uses the wah-wah pedal for much of the song (an effect used often on Goats Head Soup), as well as Leslie speakers. Charlie Watts performs a "trademark start-stop drum arrangement ... that by now had become a familiar device."[2] Bobby Keys performs a saxophone solo near the middle of the song. Jagger gives support to Richards on backing vocals.

Recorded in Kingston's Dynamic Sound Studios in November and December, 1972, "Coming Down Again" is regarded as one of Richards' best lead vocal performances.[2] Despite some popularity, Richards has never performed the song live on tour with the Rolling Stones.

[en.wikipedia.org]

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: slew ()
Date: February 2, 2019 15:44

I have always loved GHS. It suffers some because it is a drop in quality from the previous five albums. I include Get Yer Ya-Ya's in the run as it is possibly the best live album ever. My biggest let downs were Emotional Rescue (I've also grown to like this album its solid not great) and Dirty Work. Dirty Work is awful. I guess I am in the minority on the latter day albums I like them all and to never listen to them you are cheating yourself out of some good, not great music.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Date: February 2, 2019 15:58

Quote
exilestones
"Coming Down Again" is a song by the Rolling Stones featured on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup. It is sung as a duet by Keith Richards and Mick Jagger.

Credited to Jagger/Richards, "Coming Down Again" is largely the work of Richards, who went as far as to say "'Coming Down Again' is my song" at the time of its release. A slower ballad similar in mood to another track on the album, "Angie", the lyrics tell of Richards' relationship with then-girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, who had chosen to abandon her romantic liaison with his friend and bandmate Brian Jones in favour of one with Richards.

Share your thoughts, there's nothing you can hide
She was dying to survive
I was caught, oh, taken for a ride
She was showing no surprise

Slipped my tongue in someone else's pie
Tasting better ev'ry time
He turned green and tried to make me cry
Being hungry, it ain't no crime[1]

The song opens with Stones recording veteran Nicky Hopkins playing keyboards alongside a fluid, prominent bassline performed by Mick Taylor. Guitars are performed by Richards, who uses the wah-wah pedal for much of the song (an effect used often on Goats Head Soup), as well as Leslie speakers. Charlie Watts performs a "trademark start-stop drum arrangement ... that by now had become a familiar device."[2] Bobby Keys performs a saxophone solo near the middle of the song. Jagger gives support to Richards on backing vocals.

Recorded in Kingston's Dynamic Sound Studios in November and December, 1972, "Coming Down Again" is regarded as one of Richards' best lead vocal performances.[2] Despite some popularity, Richards has never performed the song live on tour with the Rolling Stones.

[en.wikipedia.org]

Pretty sure it's Jim Horn, too, in those sax solos.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: JJHMick ()
Date: February 2, 2019 17:31

Quote
exhpart
Well ...if this thread has done nothing else it made me dig out GHS and give it a listen again. It will always have a special place for me as my first Stones album. Today standout track was Coming Down Again probably change tomorrow but Coming Down Again is wonderful. Delicate piano and lyrics that for the fan actually mean something as Keith sings about Anita

I experience the same with my first Stones lp (It's only Rock'n'Roll). I know there are some/many better but I spare listening to it whenever I feel very well.

Re: Goat's Head Soup opinions
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 3, 2019 00:53

Did Keith ever mention in an interview that Coming Down Again was inspired by Anita?


"He turned green and tried to make me cry."



Green - 9

a : deficient in training, knowledge, or experience
green recruits

b : deficient in sophistication and savoir faire : NAIVE
was green and credulous

c : not fully qualified for or experienced in a particular function



I never thought of Coming Down Again as a Keith song but it certainly is a Kieth song. Jagger adds the perfect touch with the back-up vocals.

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