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Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Koen ()
Date: August 30, 2021 14:43

Quote
ribbelchips
Of course it is private, but that kind of information usually leaks. The cause of death of every celebrity that passsed away the last 50 years or so has been leaked or made public. And so is information about the funeral. How can that be still unknown in this era of smartphones and social media?

Because #charlieistoocoolfortwitter

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Date: August 30, 2021 14:58

-.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-30 15:07 by TheflyingDutchman.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: dkwalika ()
Date: August 30, 2021 15:10

My thoughts after a week of mourning:

Really disappointed about Sirius/XM's lame choices of songs, repeating the same old suspects instead of digging deeper into the greatest catalog in the history of rock.

Pleasantly surprised at the number of Stones t-shirts this weekend at our county fair, all on young people. They get it.

I got a lot of texts and calls from great old friends. They know what this guy meant to me and the band.

I want more of Charlie's jazz work now. I have the Ronnie Scott gig with the tentet, which is great. Anywhere I can grab some boots to download?

Thanks for helping me heal.

Out of Tears.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 30, 2021 15:21

When Charlie Watts Finally Made It to New York City
While his bandmates hit the Apollo, the reserved, jazz-loving drummer for the Stones could be found at Birdland.

By Michiko Kakutani
Aug. 30, 2021, 5:00 a.m. ET


The Rolling Stones visit New York for the first time in 1964. From left: Bill Wyman, Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts. Credit...William Lovelace/Daily Express/Hulton Archive, via Getty Images

In 1960, while working as an artist and graphic designer, and some years before the Rolling Stones were born, Charlie Watts began work on “Ode to a High-Flying Bird,” a captivating children’s book about his hero, the jazz great Charlie Parker. The book featured charming drawings of a bird named Charlie who realized he didn’t sound like most of the other birds, and who left home to fly to New York City, where he played “from his heart” and made a new nest for himself in “Birdland.”

Charlie Parker made a 14-year-old Charlie Watts dream the impossible dream of visiting New York and playing at a jazz club. And while he thought at the time that “the only way to get to New York was in a band on a cruise ship,” he would actually get there in 1964 with the Rolling Stones. While Keith Richards and Mick Jagger hung out at the Apollo, where James Brown was doing five — five! — shows a day, Mr. Watts spent his free time haunting the jazz clubs he’d dreamed about as a boy: He saw Charles Mingus at Birdland, Gene Krupa at the Metropole, and Sonny Rollins, Earl Hines and Miles Davis.

Many decades later, Mr. Watts would achieve his jazz dreams, when he brought his jazz combo to play at the Blue Note, but his day job for almost six decades, of course, was with the Rolling Stones. He was their indispensable drummer, whose loose, jazz-inflected playing and improvisational ardor were the not-so-secret sauce that helped make the Stones such a singular and enduring band.

“Everybody thinks Mick and Keith are the Rolling Stones,” Mr. Richards once observed. “If Charlie wasn’t doing what he’s doing on drums, that wouldn’t be true at all. You’d find out that Charlie Watts is the Stones.” Charlie Watts, Mr. Richards added in his 2010 memoir, “Life,” “has always been the bed that I lie on musically.”

“The engine” was a favorite phrase musicians used to describe Mr. Watts’s role in the band. Also: its motor, its backbone, its heartbeat, its scaffolding, its glue. The soft-spoken Mr. Watts was more modest, saying he was “brought up under the theory the drummer was an accompanist.” His job, he said, was “to keep the time and help everyone else do what they do,” to lend the music a little “swing and bounce” that would make people get up and dance.

When other drummers started going for bigger and fancier kits, adorned with all sorts of chimes and gongs, Mr. Watts stuck with a small four-piece drum set from 1957, and, unlike Keith Moon and Ginger Baker, he never went in for flash pyrotechnics or showy solos. He loved playing onstage with his mates, but he hated life on the road, hated leaving home, hated the cringe-making trappings of rock ’n’ roll — the parties, the press, the screaming girls. While his bandmates were out late at night, getting into trouble, Mr. Watts was often in his hotel room, sketching pictures of the bed: He told interviewers that he’d drawn every bed he’d slept in on tour since 1967; by 2001, he said, he’d filled 12 to 15 diaries.

For that matter, Mr. Watts said he felt out of place in the whole rock ’n’ roll scene — “I live in TCM world, Turner Classic Movies,” he told a BBC radio show, explaining that he’d inherited his father’s love for 1940s-style tailor-made suits, and regarded Fred Astaire as “the ultimate in what you should be if you’re a professional.”

Indeed, Mr. Watts was a man of contradictions — a jazzman in the world’s greatest rock ’n’ roll band, an old-fashioned gentleman among pirates and bad boys, a homebody who spent much of his work life on the road. It was also his contradictions — his loose, swinging style combined with his love of precision; his idiosyncratic technique combined with his remarkable versatility — that made him such an exceptional drummer, and the perfect musical partner for Keith Richards in forging the Stones’s signature sound.

As the band’s former bass player Bill Wyman recalled: “Every band follows the drummer. We don’t follow Charlie. Charlie follows Keith. So the drums are very slightly behind Keith. It’s only fractional. Seconds. Minuscule.” But it makes the Stones impossible to copy.

The propulsive drive of “Get Off My Cloud”; the manic, percussive beat of “19th Nervous Breakdown”; the gathering sense of menace in “Gimme Shelter”; the jazzy syncopation of “Start Me Up”; the lovely, laconic swing of “Beast of Burden” — all were testaments to Mr. Watts’s gift for modulating the mood of a track to create a musical conversation with Mr. Richards’s galvanic guitar and punctuate Mr. Jagger’s vocals and performance. The drummer had a minimalist’s instinct for how to make the most emotional impact with the most economical of licks, when to withhold and when to step on the gas, and how to effortlessly shift gears between the languid and the urgent, between savage immediacy and elegant formality.

“Time Is on My Side” (in black and white) on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964. They all wore suits or vests, I recall, except for Mr. Jagger, who wore a preppy crew-neck sweater. That weekend, I persuaded my father to drive me down to Cutler’s record shop in New Haven, Conn., where I bought “England’s Newest Hitmakers.” It was followed, not long after, by “Out of Our Heads” and “Between the Buttons” (which featured an enigmatic comic strip by Mr. Watts), and, in time, every other album the band released, even as vinyl gave way to CDs and CDs to digital downloads.

I made mix tapes of my favorite Stones tracks, and over the years, waited in lines in New York and Chicago and Paris to buy Stones tickets. The Stones were — and remain — a great live band, and no show (or song) was ever the same: “Midnight Rambler” not only waxed and waned in length — from nine to 15 minutes or so — but sometimes felt like old-school Chicago blues, sometimes more like a rock opera or improvisatory jazz. Some renditions of “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” seemed to set new land speed records, while versions of “Slipping Away” and “Wild Horses” took on affecting new layers of emotional nuance.

This is why the Rolling Stones have endured — why Charlie Watts, who initially thought the band might last three months, gave up counting after three years. They endured because of the depth and complexity of their music, which wasn’t just about “love and hope and sex and dreams,” but also about loss and time and mortality. They endured because of their connection with their audiences, and because, like the blues and jazz greats they grew up idolizing, they continually made their music new.

In his 2019 book “Sympathy for the Drummer: Why Charlie Watts Matters,” the writer and musician Mike Edison wrote: “In many ways, the Rolling Stones at their best were a more intense jazz band than Charlie’s actual jazz bands — when the Stones were cooking, not a lot got played the same way twice. There was more group improvisation.”

“Charlie played more aggressive, out-there jazz in the first four bars of ‘All Down the Line’ and the breakdowns of ‘Rip This Joint’ than with any of his jazz combos. There was more improvising and flashing of chops in ‘Midnight Rambler,’ when things were going right and Keith and Charlie were doing that thing, changing tempos and mashing up crazy shuffle stops, than there were on any quintet session.”

In such moments, Mr. Watts’s usually stoic onstage demeanor — focused, intense, in the zone — would crack into a radiant, boyish grin. “Charlie Watts playing the drums,” his biographer wrote, “is the sound of happiness, the aural equivalent of Snoopy doing his dance of joy.”
[www.nytimes.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-30 15:31 by MisterDDDD.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Date: August 30, 2021 15:33

just thinking about this great clip

[www.youtube.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: wonderboy ()
Date: August 30, 2021 16:31

Agree about Sirius. Inside four hours I heard Can't you Hear me Knocking twice.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: EJM ()
Date: August 30, 2021 16:40

Can anyone upload the lovely black and white clip of charlie at the end of the updated “spider and the fly “ in stones unzipped

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Lady Jayne ()
Date: August 30, 2021 16:53

Quote
MAF
Quote
ribbelchips
Tomorrow it has been a week since the sad news.. Isn't it a bit strange that we haven't gotten ANY information or news at all since then? Nothing about the cause of death, the (date of the) funeral
The cause of death: It's private and not our business.
Funeral: Maybe we get some news after the funeral. It will not be a big public event.

Death certificates are public records in the UK so in due course the certified cause of death will be known, when the death is registered. I would expect the funeral details will also be made public after the event. Until then any decent person would want Charlie's family to have all the privacy they need to grieve in peace and for any wishes he had to be respected. The Stones formidable PR machine is, frankly, just as good at keeping things quiet when needs be as it is of generating media stories.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: August 30, 2021 17:40

Quote
EJM

Can anyone upload the lovely black and white clip of charlie at the end of the updated “spider and the fly“



[www.YouTube.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: August 30, 2021 18:12

His facial expression reminds me a bit of Harpo Marx at the end ot that clip !

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: JN99 ()
Date: August 30, 2021 19:12

I have come here every day, multiple times a day since Charlie passed. It has been one of the ways for me of dealing with the sadness and the shock of the sudden loss. I was fully expecting Charlie would be fine, that he had a routine procedure that went well and, with any luck, we'd be seeing him on stage once again in 2022. Sadly, it was not to be of course.

The loss hit me much harder than I expected. For a man I never met and certainly did not know, I was caught off guard by just how much I was, and still am affected by this. It's been comforting knowing I am not alone, that so many of us for whom this band, and this man mean so much have been dealing with the same raw emotions.

I am still deeply saddened by the loss. I have no plans to see any of the '21 shows, that decision was made when Charlie had to drop out. Now the thought of band introductions w/o Charlie, the final bow with only 3, it's just too sad and I cannot imagine it...

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: with sssoul ()
Date: August 30, 2021 19:20

Funeral Blues

Various lines of this poem by WH Auden keep circling my head.
I know it's inappropriate in a few ways, but it's beautiful,
it has cool rhythms, and change or two can make it for Charlie.


Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the guitars to hear the silent drum.
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message ‘He is Dead’.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was our North, our South, our East and West,
Our working week and our Sunday rest,
Our noon, our midnight, our talk, our song;
I thought the Stones would last forever. I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one,
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun,
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood;
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: August 30, 2021 19:49

Margo Price - "Dead Flowers", Lexington KY 8/28




Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: VoodooLounge13 ()
Date: August 30, 2021 20:57

I, too, am still in shock and sadness over the loss of Charlie. And I am certainly not looking to start any conspiracy theories, but having had some time to be with the grief, and having read and listened to many of the tributes that poured in, I can't help but think that the band knew this was coming and did their best to try and keep it on the downlow to allow the privacy Charlie surely would have wanted. In time, I am sure we will learn the cause of death. But these are the two things that stick with me: 1. Macca saying that he knew he was ill but didn't know it was this bad, and 2. Ronnie Lane's recount of his calling up Ronnie and Ronnie saying, we knew it was coming, but it still doesn't prepare you for it.

I understand why the band would do this - to give the Watts as much time alone as conceivably possible to spend together in these final days. And I respect that immensely.

Like many here, I also feel that the band as we have come to know it has ended. I would like to try and get to St. Louis, for one final show, to pay respects and celebrate Charlie's life, and also to be among others who get it, but to go to a 60th anniversary celebration - even one that included Bill and Mick T. no longer seems legitimate to me. I am thankful for all that this band has given me, and I had missed the fact originally that Charlie passed on the 40th anniversary of TY's release - how fitting that that is the album that is being re-released later this Fall.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: August 30, 2021 21:04

Quote
with sssoul
Funeral Blues

Various lines of this poem by WH Auden keep circling my head.
I know it's inappropriate in a few ways, but it's beautiful,
it has cool rhythms, and change or two can make it for Charlie.


Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the guitars to hear the silent drum.
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message ‘He is Dead’.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was our North, our South, our East and West,
Our working week and our Sunday rest,
Our noon, our midnight, our talk, our song;
I thought the Stones would last forever. I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one,
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun,
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood;
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

Damn, sssoul, that is perfect. You can tell because I’m weeping again. So glad to see you here, but very saddened by the reason. Thank you.


Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 30, 2021 21:09

Quote
VoodooLounge13
I, too, am still in shock and sadness over the loss of Charlie. And I am certainly not looking to start any conspiracy theories, but having had some time to be with the grief, and having read and listened to many of the tributes that poured in, I can't help but think that the band knew this was coming and did their best to try and keep it on the downlow to allow the privacy Charlie surely would have wanted. In time, I am sure we will learn the cause of death. But these are the two things that stick with me: 1. Macca saying that he knew he was ill but didn't know it was this bad, and 2. Ronnie Lane's recount of his calling up Ronnie and Ronnie saying, we knew it was coming, but it still doesn't prepare you for it.

I understand why the band would do this - to give the Watts as much time alone as conceivably possible to spend together in these final days. And I respect that immensely.

Like many here, I also feel that the band as we have come to know it has ended. I would like to try and get to St. Louis, for one final show, to pay respects and celebrate Charlie's life, and also to be among others who get it, but to go to a 60th anniversary celebration - even one that included Bill and Mick T. no longer seems legitimate to me. I am thankful for all that this band has given me, and I had missed the fact originally that Charlie passed on the 40th anniversary of TY's release - how fitting that that is the album that is being re-released later this Fall.

Macca knew Charlie was ill, like we all knew Charlie was ill, after pulling out of the tour.

As for legitimacy of their 60th, technically Charlie wasn't a member until 1963.
So he will be missing from the first and last year of the 60.

Of course, the surviving and founding members should celebrate it.
Regardless of their time spent as members, but for the Glimmers, quite impressive indeed to make it 60 years with the band.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-30 21:10 by MisterDDDD.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: EJM ()
Date: August 30, 2021 21:43

Thank you so much -I love the mischievous grin

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: grzegorz67 ()
Date: August 30, 2021 22:05

Quote
Lady Jayne
Quote
MAF
Quote
ribbelchips
Tomorrow it has been a week since the sad news.. Isn't it a bit strange that we haven't gotten ANY information or news at all since then? Nothing about the cause of death, the (date of the) funeral
The cause of death: It's private and not our business.
Funeral: Maybe we get some news after the funeral. It will not be a big public event.

Death certificates are public records in the UK so in due course the certified cause of death will be known, when the death is registered. I would expect the funeral details will also be made public after the event. Until then any decent person would want Charlie's family to have all the privacy they need to grieve in peace and for any wishes he had to be respected. The Stones formidable PR machine is, frankly, just as good at keeping things quiet when needs be as it is of generating media stories.

This is where I am. I’m also in the U.K. Charlie’s last public photo was in May last year, when he and Shirley collected a rescue dog from Oxford when I thought he looked gaunt. No-one knows for sure other than those close to him, but I’d hazard a guess that poor Charlie had been ill for some time and had no chance of making the tour. To me He has looked much frailer on the last few tours.

If so, Said Stones publicity machine did exactly the right thing with their explanation for his absence from the tour to give the Watts family privacy for Charlie’s final days with his nearest and dearest away from the prying eyes of the awful U.K. tabloid press . They were all at his bedside when he passed so it clearly wasn’t a shock. I am personally grateful that he carried on playing the usual 2 hour shows until 2 years before the end. That must have been hard work.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: crawdaddy ()
Date: August 31, 2021 01:15

Completely agree with you Gregor, and losing a loved one should be as private as family would desire it to be.

We all know Charlie was a very private man, and The Rolling Stones publicity machine have done everything I'm sure, that the Watts family would agree with.

God Bless you Charlie. thumbs up

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: mmurphy0817 ()
Date: August 31, 2021 01:19

Quote
grzegorz67
Quote
Lady Jayne
Quote
MAF
Quote
ribbelchips
Tomorrow it has been a week since the sad news.. Isn't it a bit strange that we haven't gotten ANY information or news at all since then? Nothing about the cause of death, the (date of the) funeral
The cause of death: It's private and not our business.
Funeral: Maybe we get some news after the funeral. It will not be a big public event.

Death certificates are public records in the UK so in due course the certified cause of death will be known, when the death is registered. I would expect the funeral details will also be made public after the event. Until then any decent person would want Charlie's family to have all the privacy they need to grieve in peace and for any wishes he had to be respected. The Stones formidable PR machine is, frankly, just as good at keeping things quiet when needs be as it is of generating media stories.

This is where I am. I’m also in the U.K. Charlie’s last public photo was in May last year, when he and Shirley collected a rescue dog from Oxford when I thought he looked gaunt. No-one knows for sure other than those close to him, but I’d hazard a guess that poor Charlie had been ill for some time and had no chance of making the tour. To me He has looked much frailer on the last few tours.

If so, Said Stones publicity machine did exactly the right thing with their explanation for his absence from the tour to give the Watts family privacy for Charlie’s final days with his nearest and dearest away from the prying eyes of the awful U.K. tabloid press . They were all at his bedside when he passed so it clearly wasn’t a shock. I am personally grateful that he carried on playing the usual 2 hour shows until 2 years before the end. That must have been hard work.

I am of this mindset as well. We have to assume they did the best they could under the circumstances and also tried to honor what may have been Charlie's and the family's request. It is hard to sit in judgement when we don't know what we might do.

I have said it before and still believe it, if the remaining Stones want to carry on in Charlie's honor I am totally good with it.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 31, 2021 01:34

Quote
mmurphy0817
I have said it before and still believe it, if the remaining Stones want to carry on in Charlie's honor I am totally good with it.

And so was Charlie.
Posted in another thread. Great interview.

Quote
TheflyingDutchman
Great interview. Charlie gave a significant answer at 1:45:




Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: angee ()
Date: August 31, 2021 01:49

An interview with the man who wrote a biography of Charlie, Mike Edison:
"The Shuffle and the Breath: On Charlie Watts, " 27 August, 2021.

(Sorry if this was already posted)

[www.theparisreview.org]

~"Love is Strong"~



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-31 01:53 by angee.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: August 31, 2021 02:03

Many of us will have seen the A B C and D of Boogie Woogie (the C being Charlie).

Here's the A (Axel Zwingenberger) talking about Charlie, who is also heard speaking in this piece, including in his appearance on Desert Island Discs in 2001.

[www.bbc.co.uk]

And here's Charlie as that castaway choosing the eight songs - including his favourite of them all - and the book and luxury item that he would want to have with him if stranded on a desert island:

[www.bbc.co.uk]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: August 31, 2021 03:02

Quote
mmurphy0817
I have said it before and still believe it, if the remaining Stones want to carry on in Charlie's honor I am totally good with it.


As Keith and Mick have said repeatedly in the past, it's hard to imagine the Stones without Charlie - it truly is, but guess we'll find out since they've decided to carry on without him.
And guess we should be thankful they're still able and willing to do so. Even with Charlie's approval, it still must have been a tough decision for Keith and Mick considering "the engine" is no longer driving the machine.
Hopefully the coronavirus won't wreak havoc on the tour as it has with so many other tours in the US. It's so out of control right now that even the EU has removed the US from the safe travel list:

"The EU’s decision reflects growing anxiety that the rampant spread of the virus in the U.S.
could jump to Europe at a time when Americans are allowed to travel to the continent".


> Travel restrictions

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: VoodooLounge13 ()
Date: August 31, 2021 04:57

Quote
angee
An interview with the man who wrote a biography of Charlie, Mike Edison:
"The Shuffle and the Breath: On Charlie Watts, " 27 August, 2021.

(Sorry if this was already posted)

[www.theparisreview.org]


This was a great read. Thanks for posting.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: angee ()
Date: August 31, 2021 05:31

Interesting stuff, eh?

Thanks, VoodooLounge13.

~"Love is Strong"~

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: August 31, 2021 07:02

Don Everly. Memories of my greatest friend, who died this year and would have been flattened by the news of Charlie. And Charlie himself. It's a tough week, still heavy.

I don't even care about the tour at this point. Maybe this will lift and I'll consider going. It will be very, very strange.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-31 07:09 by 24FPS.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: sundevil ()
Date: August 31, 2021 07:45

thirty two pages is a lot of stuff to go through. where did it come from that everyone was at charlie's bedside?

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: treaclefingers ()
Date: August 31, 2021 07:55

Quote
24FPS
Don Everly. Memories of my greatest friend, who died this year and would have been flattened by the news of Charlie. And Charlie himself. It's a tough week, still heavy.

I don't even care about the tour at this point. Maybe this will lift and I'll consider going. It will be very, very strange.

a tough couple of years...best to you 24FPS

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: August 31, 2021 09:18

Quote
treaclefingers
Quote
24FPS
Don Everly. Memories of my greatest friend, who died this year and would have been flattened by the news of Charlie. And Charlie himself. It's a tough week, still heavy.

I don't even care about the tour at this point. Maybe this will lift and I'll consider going. It will be very, very strange.

a tough couple of years...best to you 24FPS
smileys with beer

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