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Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Topi ()
Date: September 3, 2021 11:27

Quote
philrock90
Does anyone else think the band are going to make a statement soon on the future? Maybe after the tour?

Or perhaps they will just let their actions speak for themselves instead of publishing statements.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: ribbelchips ()
Date: September 3, 2021 13:52

It's been 10 days since Charlies passing. I think it's kinda strange that there has been no official statement at all by the band itself. Nothing about the upcoming shows, not a single personal word from Mick, Keith and Ronnie.. Just a photo and a short compilation video.

Maybe it's not fair or appropriate to expect something like that as a fan. But I do think it's remarkable. When there are records or tickets to sell, their social media accounts are overflowing with video's, pictures or interviews.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Topi ()
Date: September 3, 2021 14:05

There was a statement (albeit brief, and quoting Charlie's spokesperson) on day one, when the death was announced. Also, the promoter (the party in charge of tour publicity anyway) has confirmed the tour will go on as planned.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-03 14:06 by Topi.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Date: September 3, 2021 14:29

One positive thing that may come from Charlie’s passing is that Mick & Keith will bond and be more closer to each other.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: erikjjf ()
Date: September 3, 2021 14:39

Some lovely anecdotes from Steve Maxwell Vintage Drums:

[www.youtube.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: September 3, 2021 15:31

Won't post the whole interview as I'm sure it's been posted before, but it's a good one.
Updated with some additional content for Springsteen's site yesterday, full interview linked.

THE MIGHTY ONE REMEMBERS THE WEMBLEY WHAMMER
Max Weinberg's 1983 interview with his hero Charlie Watts, from the out-of-print book The Big Beat: Conversations With Rock's Great Drummers, featuring a new preface written just for us
September 2, 2021 - By Max Weinberg

My friends at Backstreets have asked me to write a little something about my hero and friend, Charlie Watts, who died last week at the age of 80.

My heart is heavy with the loss yet full because of the talent, grace, humility, charm, wit, strength, and kindness CW spread throughout his life to his family, his fans, his friends, and his band. I am humbled and uplifted for the fact that I knew him.


Charlie & Me. The long hair and my glasses (ugh) would suggest late ’80’s! He was not only a hero to me for his art, he was a real mensch

I've talked a lot this past week about Charlie. I recalled that when I was a kid drummer in the '60s, a teen trying to find my way into the mysterious world of rock 'n' roll with a band — we didn't call them "garage bands," they were simply "bands" — we strivers would find ads for bands seeking musicians. And whether on the bulletin board of Rondo Music on Route 22 in Union, New Jersey (in my particular case), or in the Public Notice Music section of New York City’s The Village Voice (as pointed out to me some years ago by the great Modern Drummer interviewer Robyn Flans), those ads invariably included bands looking for a "Charlie Watts-type drummer."
Charlie Watts had become a genre unto himself!

The Rolling Stones back then were perfect for us somewhat-inept-but-hungry emulators. Beatles music was too hard; no one even attempted to play anything other than The Beatles' cover tunes. But, the Rolling Stones — blues-based — their songs you could pound out on the drums, and your excitement with the beat would cover up any of your insufficiencies.

I first saw The Rolling Stones on November 7, 1965 at what was then the Mosque Theater (now Symphony Hall) on Broad Street in Newark, New Jersey. My friend and I took the #77 bus down South Orange Avenue practically to the theater for the first show. We somehow paid three dollars for two second-row seats. When they were introduced, the girls' screams from the audience were loud—not as loud, perhaps, as The Beatles, but loud enough to send your heart into overdrive.

They opened with Solomon Burke's "Everybody Needs Somebody to Love," and a half-hour later Charlie Watts became indelibly etched in my heart and soul as the coolest cat I'd ever seen.

Nonchalant, seeming to throw it all away, Charlie held the drum chair with the aplomb of a hip jazz drummer who happened to find himself a founding member of what would become the self-proclaimed "World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band."

Why were they great? And still are? Of course, the songs, but even more than that, through the ups-and-downs, the angst, the absolute unique setup of a "democratic" rock 'n' roll band… they stayed together.

In many ways Charlie was not only the bedrock drummer of the Stones, as the New York Times put it last week, Charlie was the soul of the band. Proud to be there but somehow detached, as if looking in from the outside—in the way he referred to them as "them" — Charlie kept them grounded when the rock 'n' roll demons might have reached up through the quicksand and pulled them down.

Backstreets has pulled the Charlie chapter from The Big Beat as a way to look back at a snapshot from some 39 years ago, when Bob Santelli (well known to readers of Backstreets) and I set out to ask the question why, not how, you play the drums. It was Dave Marsh's original idea after a friend of mine, author Harvey Kubernik, asked me if I wanted to meet Hal Blaine, the truly legendary L.A. session man. We met, and that conversation was the genesis of the idea of setting down their stories.

As I said, Dave said I should do it. Now, you've got to know something about me — I was the guy who'd stay up all night to write the essay due in the morning. Mr. Procrastinator! But with a lot of encouragement from Dave, and the helpful writing tutorials from Bob, I set out to write a book.

Crazy, right?

I have to admit, it was a daunting proposition to sit across from the drummers I had so long admired, to be prepared to ask pointed, in-depth questions about their histories, and not come off as Chris Farley on SNL when he asked Paul McCartney, "…remember when you were in the Beatles?"

Fanboy that I was, I think back to sitting with Charlie, in the lovely tea room of his town house by the Thames River in London, as we talked drums and drummer history, mostly. It was my first one-on-one with him, and he couldn't have been more gracious and accommodating.

Throughout my life and career I've had so many of my childhood dreams and fantasies become real. One of those was getting to meet Charlie Watts. To become a casual friend, being invited to a Stones show when he was in town, seeing his Orchestra or Quintet or — how do you say it in -et? — ten-piece band was always a treat.

Once he invited Becky, my wife, and me to see his five-piece at the Blue Note in New York. Small jazz club. You could tell he was having the time of his life playing the music, in his imitable style, that he loved so much. We were sitting stageside, and when the set was over, Charlie swept down from the drums, handed his sticks to me (which I still have), and fingered the lapels of my suit.

Oh, yeah, I always dressed up to see Charlie play. Respect. For me, it was like going to temple. As he inspected the material, he appraised, "Nice — worsted wool." But then Charlie bowed, took Becky's hand to lightly brush with a kiss, and in his oh-so-suave British accent said, "…and milady's in silk." Which she was.

What a moment!

Charlie Watts was royalty. Not in the monarchy sense, of course, but in the sublime manner with which he strolled through life, dapper as a dandy, with enough artistic talent — both on the drums and in visual arts — to not only become a genre unto himself but to truly earn the sobriquet of icon.

As I seem to have mentioned many times this past week, a New Jersey songwriter of some repute has on occasion observed, "There have been pretenders, there have been contenders, but there is only one (you fill in the blank)."

Well, in this case, I write in the name of Charlie Watts, who truly was a singular sensation.

Full article w interview-
[backstreets.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: September 3, 2021 16:15

Quote
ribbelchips

It's been 10 days since Charlies passing. I think it's kinda strange that there has been no official statement at all by the band itself.

Patience - maybe it'll come when the US-Tour starts. It's still a shock that Charlie won't come back anymore. And you don't wanna talk much if you have suddenly lost a very close person.

On the other hand they (or their management) should release a statement later on to stop speculations and to ensure that the history books are written correctly.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: September 3, 2021 16:35

The Rolling Stones’ Charlie Watts was a gentleman rock star


Music archivist David Peck with The Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts when they first met at Jack Murphy Stadium on Feb. 3, 1998.
(Courtesy photo)

David Peck had a 23-year friendship with late Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts

Diane Bell
August 28, 2021

Due to a strange series of events, David Peck says he owes his career to The Rolling Stones and drummer Charlie Watts, who died Tuesday at age 80.

They first met backstage at the memorable Rolling Stones concert at Jack Murphy Stadium on Feb. 3, 1998. Peck was sitting in the third row when a downpour erupted just as the band launched into “Gimme Shelter.”

He most recently met with Watts backstage in Pasadena’s Rose Bowl on Aug. 22, 2019, at one of the band’s final concerts before the pandemic. It was the last time he would see the legendary drummer after more than two decades of friendship bonded by the music they both loved.

Peck is quick to acknowledge they weren’t “best friends.” But over the years, Peck estimates he has rendezvoused with Watts more than 40 times backstage at music venues.

“I was always welcome. He was always gracious,” Peck says. “He never changed. He always was the same sweet person every time.”

Peck makes a living archiving and licensing music video and film footage of entertainers, performers, artists and history makers. His company, Reelin’ In The Years Productions, stores thousands of hours of music and interview footage spanning nine decades — footage that is in demand by music and film producers.

He doesn’t consider himself a VIP, but he earned a Grammy nomination in 2004 for his music video, “The American Folk Blues Festival, 1962-1966, Volume One.”

In 1984, when Peck was 18, someone showed the San Diegan a bootlegged video of The Rolling Stones’ performance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1966, three years before the group’s young founder, Brian Jones, died.

“It blew my mind that I could see Brian Jones’ moves ... and I got bitten by the (archive) bug hard,” Peck says.

First he collected The Rolling Stones footage, added the Beatles, then branched into collecting and archiving many different styles of music and artists “from Frank Sinatra to the Sex Pistols and everything in between.”

But it was his introduction by Watts and keyboardist Chuck Leavell to a Belgian rock promoter at a Rolling Stones concert in Amsterdam on July 6, 1998, that led to his access to European music archives that catapulted his business to the next level.

Peck and Watts enjoyed a mutual love of music history. Peck often shared video footage with Watts that he thought would interest him. In 1999, Watts gave an endorsement on The Rolling Stones letterhead to Reelin’ In The Years Productions that read: “I’m impressed with the depth of David Peck’s archives, the jazz footage in particular.”


The last time David Peck met with Charlie Watts was at the Rose Bowl in 2019; From left, Rob Bowman, Watts, Chuck Leavell, Peck.
(Courtesy photo)

“I could sit here all day and wax eloquent about what an amazing musician Charlie was and how no one else could have been in his shoes and done what he did, but everybody knows that,” Peck says. “What most people don’t know is what a genuine, decent, loving, non-egotistical person he was.”

Not long after they met in early 1998, Watts left a voicemail on Peck’s machine. “I still have it,” he says. Watts spoke of film footage of Frank Sinatra and Fred Astaire, thanked him and said, “See you Thursday.”

Because of his profession, Peck has had the good fortune to meet and work with highly successful people in the entertainment world.

“Charlie was the nicest, hands down, and the most genuine,” Peck says. “He was an English gentleman, very proper and very nice. ... He didn’t really live the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle.”

In tribute, Peck posted some of his photos, his memories and a letter from Watts on his Facebook page.

“Charlie always signed his letters, ‘C.R. Watts (Drummer The Rolling Stones)’ — as if there could be another one.”

One of Peck’s favorite tales took place at a 1998 Stones performance at the Hard Rock Casino in Las Vegas. He was waiting in a makeshift backstage area with Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt and Pamela Anderson.

“I’m not an A-lister. I don’t even make the alphabet,” Peck jokes. Nevertheless, when ticket sales manager Shelley Lazar lifted the curtain to the adjacent room, she announced: ‘David, Charlie will see you now.’”

“Brad Pitt was looking at me as if to say, ‘Who the hell is he?’

Watts greeted Peck and escorted him into a kitchen area and a seat next to Penny Marshall.

“He looks at me and says in a sweet voice, ‘David, can I get you anything?’

“I’m looking at him and thinking to myself how much joy his music had given me and he’s asking me if there’s anything he can get for me?”

Another memorable moment that night was when he asked Watts if he planned to tour that summer with the Stones. “He leans into me and says, ‘They won’t let me leave.’”

Watts referred to his band cohorts as “they,” almost as though they were separate entities, Peck says.

“He didn’t take anything for granted. He didn’t expect anything because he was a rock star. He was just a regular guy.”

[www.sandiegouniontribune.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: September 3, 2021 17:26

Amazing account, Charlie was "humble", unassuming" etc...but he did know his name could help, i.e. that letter on RS letterhead ;-)

As for the "they", that guy should know that all the Stones, including Mick and Keith, refer to the Stones as "they" ;-)

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: September 3, 2021 18:56




Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Lady Jayne ()
Date: September 3, 2021 19:51

Quote
makemeburnthecandle
One positive thing that may come from Charlie’s passing is that Mick & Keith will bond and be more closer to each other.

This is my, somewhat sentimental, hope. Whatever has gone down over the years, it was a potent friendship in the past and their names and reputations will be forever linked because of the music. At this stage in the game, no-one knows how much time any of them have left so I hope they are fully reconciled.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Massimo68 ()
Date: September 3, 2021 22:31

Rolling Stone France (weekly edition, only digital) :





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-03 22:33 by Massimo68.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: September 3, 2021 22:44

Nice cover and nice to see they have a special release for him but I hope they got some knowledgeable guys and good proof readers because they'd done a Stones special in 2012 and was pathetically bad, full of huge mistakes that even someone with a cursory knowledge of the Stones wouldn't have made.


On a better note I've just come across a great interview by Steve Ferrone...



...about Charlie with some cool insight ("He was a little walking encyclopedia on musicology"), funny stuff/anecdotes (4x drummers pictures) and words of wisdom at the end...

[www.pollstar.com]

Quote

what’s going to happen now if The Rolling Stones continue to tour, people are going to love the songs, they’re going to love seeing Mick and Keith, and Ronnie and Bernard Fowler and Jordan up there playing and all the other guys in the band, but I think they’ll always think about Charlie. that’s going to be his legacy, is that he’ll always be the Rolling Stones’ drummer.

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-03 22:45 by gotdablouse.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: parislocksmith ()
Date: September 3, 2021 23:50

Quote
Posted by: crholmstrom ()
Date: August 31, 2021 19:41

Tribute from Nick Cave:


Only saw this now. Great story. In spirit a bit like Bill Wyman's Charlie story on Letterman.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: paulspendel ()
Date: September 4, 2021 00:56

Look at the sign in the picture top left under the cymbals. Eerie.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: angee ()
Date: September 4, 2021 01:31

MrDDDD:

Thanks for the wonderful stuff between Max Weinberg and Charlie and the link to the whole interview Max did. thumbs up

~"Love is Strong"~

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: September 4, 2021 02:47

Dancing with the 'gentleman of rock', Stones drummer Charlie Watts

Vicki Anderson
Sep 04 2021

British photographer Dave Hogan has photographed The Rolling Stones for 40 years. He talks to Vicki Anderson, paying tribute to late drummer Charlie Watts and the band's enduring friendship.

Dave ''Hogie'' Hogan is currently rolling with the pandemic punches on a beach in Barbados.

From his vantage point, azure coloured waves roll on to pristine white sand.

It is a view the famed photographer punctuates with leisurely strolls on the beach where serene shirtless men sunbathe against walls, spliffs dangling loosely from the edge of their lips.

With one eye to the frame, Hogan documents the scene around him as he has done for most of his life.

But it's a quieter scene than the rock 'n’ roll world he's used to.

Hogan has spent the last 40 years documenting the famous with one eye shut. From David Bowie to Prince, Amy Winehouse and Madonna, he has photographed them all.


The Rolling Stones spotted at The 100 Club in London's Tottenham Court Road in February 1986. Dave Hogan/Getty Images

As The Rolling Stones photographer of choice in recent years, he has been privy to, and has captured on film, some of the iconic band's greatest moments.

This week he has walked the sun-kissed beach in the Caribbean, reflecting on the passing of the ''gentleman of rock 'n roll''.

Hogan notes with reverence the worldwide ''outpouring of love'' since the death of 80-year-old drummer Charlie Watts – one of the greatest of all time – in London on August 24.

''I'm a hired hand who has been privileged to be allowed access into their inner circle,'' he says. ''I have been photographing them since the 1980s and more recently have been employed by the band ... think I've done their last four official photo sessions.

''Here are a group of men in their late 70s – Charlie was 80 – they're doing what they love and to witness that incredible relationship between a group of men, it's really special.''

These are men whose lives have echoed one another's since the 1960s.

Armed with a basic Canon ''point and press'' Hogan recalls a gig The Rolling Stones performed in 1980 at the 100 Club in London – the oldest independent venue worldwide.

''Your name would be on a list. You turn up, there's 100 people in this little club in there living on recycled sweat, in like your granny's front room,'' he says.

''And it's the Rolling Stones doing their back catalogue for me and 99 other people.''


The Rolling Stones perform live at The 100 Club, London, in 1982. Dave Hogan/Getty Images

Watts loved to play jazz and his side project with Ben Waters, is the jazz outfit The ABC and D of Boogie Woogie.

Waters has a long-lasting relationship with New Zealand, in particular Christchurch and played an intimate show in a quaint venue in Akaroa, touring with Jagger's brother, Chris Jagger. Two members of The Rolling Stones crew, Bernard Fowler and Tim Ries, also played there.

There were hopes, one day, of perhaps staging a Rolling Stones performance here circa the 100 Club but in Banks Peninsula.

''The thing about The Rolling Stones is they're serving the music,'' says Hogan. ''That's what it's all about for them, arguably that may be why they've enjoyed such longevity. They're comfortable in a club or playing to half a million people in Cuba.”

Watts was a legendary drummer, but he also possessed a fantastic right hook.

There's a notable story documented in Keith Richards' 2010 autobiography, Life.

In it, Richards recalls witnessing Watts throw a punch in a ''rare moment''.

He and Jagger had returned to their hotel in Amsterdam after a night out in 1984 when Jagger picked up a phone to call Watts at ''about five in the morning''.

Jagger asked Watts: ''Where's my drummer?'' and hung up when Watts didn't respond.

''About 20 minutes later, there was a knock at the door'’, Richards wrote in his memoir. ‘’There was Charlie Watts, Savile Row suit, perfectly dressed, tie, shaved, the whole f...ing bit. I could smell the cologne! I opened the door, and he didn't even look at me,'' Richards continued.

''He walked straight past me, got hold of Mick and said: 'Never call me your drummer again'. Then he hauled him up by the lapels ... and gave him a right hook.''

Richards recalled in his book that the resulting punch was such that Jagger then ''fell back onto a silver platter of smoked salmon on the table and began to slide towards the open window and the canal below it'.'

The frontman was retrieved before he took an unintentional dip in the canal.

Hogan chuckles at the mention of the infamous tale involving the dapper Watts.

''I'm sure they have had little squabbles over the years, like any family really. I've photographed their kids and grandchildren and there is something in the genes, they're all talented.''

The Rolling Stones have a circle of people who have worked alongside them for decades.

''There are lots of people you'd never work with them again in this industry, but with the Stones people keep coming back. There's such a loyalty and respect among their crew,'' says Hogan.

Whenever he was booked to photograph the band, Hogan says Watts was always the first to arrive.

''He was a gentleman. He'd turn up and talk to everyone, and he'd put them at ease. Here's the biggest rock 'n’ roll drummer in the world, and he knew how to deal with people.''

Hogan describes himself as a ''great witnesser''.

When photographing them, in agreement with the band, Hogan had an ''access all areas’’ arrangement.

''It is a relationship of trust, a privileged position to witness what is going on,'' he says. ''Sometimes they are just drinking herbal tea. They're just super cool people ... the kind of people you want to drink tea with and listen to them talk.’’

Live music photography involves ‘’dancing’’ to find the right moment, the right light.

''I've worked with some of the most powerful figures in the world. We know the ones who are one-hit wonders, packaged, signed, and then they spend years trying to get out of their contracts.

''The Rolling Stones are not that, and we should celebrate it.’’

He recalls the band donating funds to build a recording studio in an academy in east London.

''I would say 99 per cent of those kids wouldn't have a f...ing clue who The Rolling Stones are. It's not their demographic, but the fact that in their late 70s they are still prepared to give back, it is something which doesn't get told enough.''

The waves are calling, but not before Hogan shares a special memory – being invited to document The Rolling Stones’ first show in Cuba in 2016, which is shown in the concert film, Havana Moon.

'The Rolling Stones were to come down the steps of the aeroplane, and I'd agreed with them and management that we'd do the picture of them there with a Cuban flag behind.

''But, of course, when we decided this, we didn't factor there would be half a million people there for a free concert, and we were in the middle of a field. It was buzzing.’’


The Rolling Stones perform during their concert at Ciudad Deportiva on March 25, 2016 in Havana, Cuba. Dave Hogan/Getty Images

Thinking on his feet, as the best photographers are particularly apt at doing, Hogan instead draped a Cuban flag backstage.

''It got dark very quickly, I needed light. I had six security guards each holding massive torches,'' he recalls.

''I do these pictures, each one of them is shining torches, everyone is smiling and then The Rolling Stones walk out on stage and I walk out there with them, and you get this buzz of half a million people who have come to see the biggest band in the world. They've all got mobile phones on, and it's shining like Christmas. Witnessing that and moments like that ... there's no price.''

A fortnight ago, Hogan was working with Wood and others from the band's crew. Wood has had his own health battles and survived cancer twice.

''We were chatting. If you looked back and went to the bookmakers and said 'look, we have these superstars, we have Prince, George Michael, David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, we are going to give you a $100 bet on who is still alive in 2021’, would you have picked that? The longevity is incredible.”

Staring out to sea, Hogan can't believe Watts has ‘’left the show’’.

He recalls a recent conversation about a tour.

''The news was Charlie was going to take time out from the tour, but nobody ever imagined he wasn't going to be there. It was just that he was having a break, that's what the feeling was.”

Hogan believes the band will ''carry on at some stage''. Calm and elegant, Watts was the ''backbone of The Rolling Stones''.

''There's got to be some massive tribute for him when the time is right.

'’The gentleman of rock. I hope I get a call again to go and do some pictures, but it's never going to be the same again because Charlie's not there.

''It's the end of an era.''

[www.stuff.co.nz]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: September 4, 2021 03:03

This pic is very telling about the respect Charlie garnered and gave imo.
Couldn't be more different stylistically, but engaged in mutually respectful conversation. (is what I see winking smiley


[twitter.com]

Or.. Charlie could be telling Ronnie not to use the whole stage, and Ronnie is thinking... the %6$# we won't. Either way, cool pic winking smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-06 02:00 by MisterDDDD.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: paulywaul ()
Date: September 4, 2021 11:57

Quote
MisterDDDD
This pic is very telling about the respect Charlie garnered and gave imo.
Couldn't be more different stylistically, but engaged in mutually respectful conversation. (is what I see winking smiley



Or.. Charlie could be telling Ronnie not to use the whole stage, and Ronnie is thinking... the %6$# we won't. Either way, cool pic winking smiley

I couldn't agree more. If a picture truly paints a thousand words, then this one says it all. Absolutely marvellous !

[ I want to shout, but I can't hardly speak ]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: dcba ()
Date: September 4, 2021 22:10

Quote
bye bye johnny
Dancing with the 'gentleman of rock', Stones drummer Charlie Watts

Sep 04 2021

British photographer Dave Hogan has photographed The Rolling Stones for 40 years. He talks to Vicki Anderson



''There's got to be some massive tribute for him when the time is right.

In London of course! thumbs up

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Kingbeebuzz ()
Date: September 5, 2021 20:40

This week should see Charlie’s private funeral, most likely in Devon at Dolton church close to where he lived. With careful organisation and the cooperation of the police, it should be possible for other Stones to attend with the public kept well away, if Shirley wishes this.

I would suggest there will be a London memorial service at a later date.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: September 6, 2021 01:53

Quote
paulywaul
Quote
MisterDDDD
This pic is very telling about the respect Charlie garnered and gave imo.
Couldn't be more different stylistically, but engaged in mutually respectful conversation. (is what I see winking smiley



Or.. Charlie could be telling Ronnie not to use the whole stage, and Ronnie is thinking... the %6$# we won't. Either way, cool pic winking smiley

I couldn't agree more. If a picture truly paints a thousand words, then this one says it all. Absolutely marvellous !

I hate to ask and embarrassing; is this 1976 Knebworth and Skynyrd?

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: September 6, 2021 02:02

Quote
shattered

I hate to ask and embarrassing; is this 1976 Knebworth and Skynyrd?

Yes. I forgot to add the link for the pic (now added).

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: September 6, 2021 02:03

Quote
MisterDDDD
Quote
shattered

I hate to ask and embarrassing; is this 1976 Knebworth and Skynyrd?

Yes. I forgot to add the link for the pic (now added).

Thank you.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: September 6, 2021 04:29

Not a Royal fan or buff, bit always struck me that if any of them was deserving and befitting of a knighthood, it was Charlie.


The King of Rock 'n' Roll: How Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts secretly bought Edward VIII's Savile Row suits

Charlie Watts, who died aged 80 last month, was much praised for his impeccable style.

Now it has emerged that the Rolling Stones drummer possessed a secret treasure trove of Royal clothes.

According to friends, Watts had a collection of Edward VIII's suits known only to those closest to him.

[www.dailymail.co.uk]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-06 17:22 by MisterDDDD.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: dcba ()
Date: September 6, 2021 11:44

Quote
MisterDDDD


The King of Rock 'n' Roll: How Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts secretly bought Edward VIII's Savile Row suits

Ouch that'd be one stain on an otherwise immaculate life. Bying suits worn by a man who was even more Nazi that the turds that surrounded @#$%&...
Nah not good!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: steffialicia ()
Date: September 6, 2021 14:20

Quote
dcba
Quote
MisterDDDD


The King of Rock 'n' Roll: How Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts secretly bought Edward VIII's Savile Row suits

Ouch that'd be one stain on an otherwise immaculate life. Bying suits worn by a man who was even more Nazi that the turds that surrounded @#$%&...
Nah not good!

That hurts.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: pftw04 ()
Date: September 6, 2021 14:36

Read somewhere that Charlie Watts died of natural causes,as he was 80 years. However I really do not believe. I mean he passed away suddenly.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Kingbeebuzz ()
Date: September 6, 2021 14:57

The pictures of Edward VIII suits do not support the story. The clothes that Charlie is pictured are not the same as those Edward VIII is wearing.

For example, the breast pocket of the pink jackets are different. The bottom of Charlie’s pocket is not level with the top button and the top left of his pocket is under the lapel. On Edwards the button is level with the bottom of the pocket and the top left of the pocket is not covered by the lapel.

On the check suits the buttons are clearly different. Charlie’s has three rows of buttons, whilst Edwards has only two rows. Edwards suit has no pocket on the lower left of the picture whilst Charlie’s does. Also Charlie’s jacket appears to have no breast pocket but that is not totally clear.

Charlie may or may not have bought and worn second hand clothes but I doubt that and these pictures don’t support that story.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: ribbelchips ()
Date: September 6, 2021 16:32

Quote
pftw04
Read somewhere that Charlie Watts died of natural causes,as he was 80 years. However I really do not believe. I mean he passed away suddenly.

To us it was suddenly, but his last public appearance was when he played 'air drums' on the "Together at home" rendition of YGAGWYW. And that was april 2020. Nearly 1.5 years before his death. He looked fine there, but on the picture posted by the Forever Hounds Thrust,he looks emaciated. And that was only a month later. I think Charlie's death was not that suddenly to his (inner) circle than it was to us.

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