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Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 14, 2021 13:18


Rolling Stones Framed Laser Cut Platinum Vinyl Record


[goldrecordoutlet.com]

[www.google.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-10-14 13:19 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 16, 2021 13:05


NYC Video Shoot - July 1981

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 26, 2021 05:17


Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 28, 2021 01:14




Keith Richards - Apple Music Interview
10/25/21
[www.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-10-31 01:24 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: October 28, 2021 01:44

Quote
exilestones


The Atlanta show did indeed have fantastic versions of "Just My Imagination" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want."

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 31, 2021 01:33

Wayne Perkins does the solos on "Hand of Fate" and "Worried About You."

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 1, 2021 10:38






Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 6, 2021 11:19


Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 15, 2021 04:12

Chantilly Lace

On May 26, 1982, the Rolling Stones, joined by Ian Stewart on piano and Chuck Leavell on keyboards embarked on their Tattoo You European tour (Aberdeen, Scotland, May 26 - Leeds, England, July 25). The tour meant Leavell's live debut with the band, whereas it turned out to be the very last one for Stu. Bobby Keys and Gene Barge, another Stones newcomer, played saxophones during the tour.

Just like during the 1981 US tour, the main part of the setlist comprised material from the Stones' last three albums, "Some Girls", "Emotional Rescue", and "Tattoo You". In the rock-and-roll covers section, crowd pleasers 'Going To A Go Go' and 'Twenty Flight Rock' was supplemented with The Big Bopper's 'Chantilly Lace'.


During the tour Ian Stewart once again joined George Thorogood and the Destroyers on stage for a couple of times, on one occasion (The Hague, June 3) accompanied by Mick Jagger and Bobby Keys, performing a couple of Chuck Berry tunes. Completely unrehearsed....but rocking!




[www.youtube.com]



Bad To The Bone

During the Rolling Stones' 1981 US tour support acts changed from venue to venue, but amongst the regulars were George Thorogood and the Destroyers, a Delaware-based blues-rock band led by vocalist and guitarist George Thorogood. Ian Stewart joined the band on stage during a couple of shows, among which the famous one at Hampton Coliseum (December 18).

Stu must have felt attracted to the Destroyers because they always, right from their start in 1977, dug deep into the Chess Records back catalog, performing songs from longtime Rolling Stones heroes and influencers Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Howlin' Wolf, and many others. In 2011, George Thorogood and the Destroyers paid tribute to the legendary label on their album 2120 South Michigan Ave.

Early 1982 Ian Stewart also entered the studio with the band, to record one of their most well-known albums, "Bad To The Bone" (released September 1982). Stu played piano and/or organ on almost all album tracks, including the smash hit title track (more than loosely based on Bo Diddley's 'I'm A Man'), Chuck Berry's 'No Particular Place To Go', Jimmy Reed's 'It's A Sin', the Isley Brothers' 'Nobody But Me', and others. If you're interested, listen to the full album right down here.




[www.youtube.com]


[ianstewartsixthstone.blogspot.com]

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 17, 2021 03:56

One Bourbon, One Scotch, & One Story - Episode 9: The Rolling Stones






[www.youtube.com]


[www.billboard.com]

Party rocker George Thorogood's first-ever solo album Party Of One -- which includes a cover of the Rolling Stones' "No Expectations," premiering exclusively below -- has been a long time coming. Thorogood tells Billboard that the idea of a solo album was on the docket when he first signed with Rounder Records back in the mid-70s. The formation of his band the Destroyers put that plan on hold, however -- for 40 years after the release of the group's first album.

"It was a foregone conclusion I would someday make a record solo acoustic; I just never seemed to get around to it and time went on and we kept it in mind," Thorogood says. "I ran into the Rounder people a few years ago. They said, 'Y'know, you still haven't done that solo record yet,' and I said, 'Well, maybe now's the time to do it,' so there you have it."

The idea behind Party Of One, which comes out Aug. 4 on Rounder, was "picking a song from every artist that really means something to me." As such the 15-song set features songs by Robert Johnson, Elmore James, John Lee Hooker, Willie Dixon, Brownie McGhee, Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Hank Williams and more. And having a Rolling Stones song on the list was also a no-brainer for Thorogood.

"If it wasn't for the Rolling Stones, I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing, and there's many artists who can say the same thing," Thorogood notes. "Everybody who saw the Stones thought they were so groovy. Everybody wanted to do that. And also the first blues person I saw was Howlin' Wolf on Shindig! when the Rolling Stones brought him on. And, as coincidence would have it, that was also the first time I saw anybody play slide guitar, in this case Brian Jones. So I knew there had to be a Rolling Stones song on this record."

"No Expectations," meanwhile, was chosen after a bit of consideration. "I said, 'Well, what is there by them that you can play by yourself, since they did everything as a band?'" Thorogood recalls. "I started fooling around with 'No Expectations' and the producer (Jim Gaines) said, 'That's the one! You've got to play that one,' which is also Brian Jones playing slide guitar. He was quite a unique talent and really instrumental in forming the Stones in the first place. When he played that slide guitar I was more fascinated with that than Brian's hair, and everyone knows in the '60s Brian Jones had the baddest hair in rock 'n' roll."




[www.youtube.com]


++++++++

Stones Sidesteps: The STU Sidesteps\
This is a series of recordings provided by nzb to present the side projects of some of the Rolling Stones (Ian 'Stu' Stewart, Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman).

This part of the series is devoted to STU, the only person that can be called the 6th Stone (but in fact, he was the 2nd Stone).

Thanks to nzb who provided us his recordings, to Jaap (Stonesmuziekfan) who gave critic and advice regarding my work, and to my friend Riccardo (MrNo) who participated in a big part of my collection.




Volume 10:
With George THOROGOOD & the DESTROYERS: Part 3

14th June 1982: GEORGE THOROGOOD and THE DESTROYERS . Paris, France (opening for the Rolling Stones)

Line-up: STU* (p)/George Thorogood (gtr, voc)/Bill Blough (bass)/Jeff Simon (dr)/Hank Carter (sax)

Note: It seems that STU didn't play on "The Sky Is Crying."


01 - Ride On Josephine (Ellas McDaniel) *
02 - It Wasn’t Me (Chuck Berry) *
03 - The Sky Is Crying (Elmore James)
04 - Madison Blues (Elmore James) *
05 - Nobody But Me (Rudolph Isley/Ronald Isley/O’Kelly Isley)
06 - No Particular Place To Go (Chuck Berry) *
07 - Reelin’ And Rockin’ (Chuck Berry) *
08 - Move It On Over (Hank Williams)*-incomplete

As usual all the infos are taken from The Rolling Stones Complete Works Database by Nico Zentgraf [nzentgraf.de].

This one is rare so, as often in this case, the sound is poor. There is much rumble coming from the tape recording but there is nothing I can do about it.



Posted on IORR [www.iorr.org] by StonyRoad in December 2017.

[tela.sugarmegs.org]

[ianstewartsixthstone.blogspot.com]

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 21, 2021 22:15




[www.udiscovermusic.com]

News of the deluxe Tattoo You arrives 40 years to the week since the album’s first release on August 24, 1981. Produced by the Glimmer Twins with associate producer Chris Kimsey, it went to No.1 and quadruple platinum status in the US, also topping the charts in Canada, Australia, and across much of Europe, winning gold and platinum certifications around the world.



The deluxe formats of Tattoo You (40th Anniversary Edition) include Lost & Found: Rarities and Still Life: Wembley Stadium 1982. The Lost & Found disc features nine unreleased tracks from the Tattoo You era, newly completed and enhanced with additional vocals and guitar by the band.



As well as “Living In The Heart Of Love,” they include a great version of their blues hero Jimmy Reed’s 1963 staple “Shame, Shame, Shame,” a cover of Dobie Gray’s 1973 soul standard and Top 5 US pop hit “Drift Away,” and a different version of “Start Me Up” with a reggae vibe.



Still Life: Wembley Stadium 1982 captures the Stones’ London show in June of that year on the Tattoo You tour. The 26-track set features an opening “Under My Thumb” and many of their greatest hits including “Let’s Spend The Night Together,” You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” “Honky Tonk Women,” “Miss You,” and “Brown Sugar.” The set included cover of the Temptations’ “Just My Imagination,” Eddie Cochran’s “Twenty Flight Rock,” the Miracles’ “Going To A Go Go,” and the Big Bopper’s “Chantilly Lace”; and live versions of then-new Tattoo You tracks such as “Start Me Up,” “Neighbours,” “Little T&A,” and “Hang Fire.”



These photos, which are being used in the Tattoo You Deluxe promotions were actually taken in Paris in 1978 when "Start Me Up" was recorded.
Photos by Helmut Newton.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 24, 2021 19:28


Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 26, 2021 20:05

Philadelphia




[www.youtube.com]

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Captain Teague ()
Date: November 26, 2021 21:45

Quote
exilestones
Philadelphia




[www.youtube.com]

"Greatest American group" ... FFS

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: November 27, 2021 03:24

Quote
exilestones

Those "aging rockers".

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: November 28, 2021 03:47

Tattoo You 2021 Promo Videos




[www.youtube.com]





[www.youtube.com]





[www.youtube.com]

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: December 4, 2021 17:21


Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: December 8, 2021 20:17

EAST RUTHERFORD














Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: December 20, 2021 01:49

The Most Important Thing Mick Jagger Ever Wore Was a Pair of Football Pants!




When Jagger’s band mates dragged him on tour in 1981 (reportedly against his will, according to Keith Richards’s memoir), and brought the band into sports arenas for outdoor concerts (something they seemed too artistically sophisticated to do), he put on football pants and barked out his lyrics like a quarterback yelling, “Hut hut!”

Jagger’s football pants phase remains one of his most divisive wardrobe choices, in a career packed with strange attire, from skin-tight jumpsuits to giant capes to uncanny yuppie getups.


“I chose the football pants to wear this tour because they are easy to work in,” Jagger told People at the time. “It was sort of an accident—I went into a sports store, and they fit better than anything, and they only cost 20 bucks. In Dallas I wore the Dallas Cowboy colors. People dig that, and it has a good look for outdoors where you’ve got to wear bright colors or
people can’t see you. You can’t be too subtle in a situation like that.”

The football pants allowed Jagger to move swiftly around the stage, and helped audiences see him from far-flung seats—that much is clear from the pictures. (Their fit and lace-up fly also had the benefit of highlighting Jagger’s crotch.) But the clash of colors wasn’t exactly in a harmonious team player spirit: he wore neon yellow pants with an electric blue tank top and a lavender blazer; white ones with either a neon teal puffer and a yellow quilted puffer; a construction cone-orange tank with tangerine pants. He’d often add red or blue kneepads, or a banded blue belt, which created an even more maniacal riot of color, and he’d take off his shirt and reassemble his outfit as he became increasingly sweaty or as the weather grew increasingly cool (the concerts, according to Rolling Stones message board IORR.org, often started at noon). Jagger’s insistence that these were just easy to work in is typical Jagger swagger and posture— of course there was more to it than that. One orange and green jacket appears to be Issey Miyake, and he finished every one of these absurd, almost jester-like outfits with white Capezio jazz dance shoes. It sounds like a ludicrous combination, but that is, of course, the secret to all the best outfits in history—an assemblage whose whole is less insane than the sum of its parts.


Certainly other of the Stones’ costumes have gotten (deservedly) more attention—his Bianca-era dapper bohemianism, for example, or his skin-tight spangly Ossie Clark jumpsuits, or his elaborate glittery outfits by former partner L’Wren Scott, or his mid-70s oversexed chest-baring twang phase, when the Stones were at their artistic peak. In fact, the football pants look was only a small feature of the recent Stones paraphernalia tour Exhibitionism.



While it’s often derided or simply forgotten, the football pants era was also the one that fixed Jagger in a new echelon of fashion iconography. He has something of a fashion editor’s eye—Jagger can make anything fashion, and his approval gives a garment a gloss of meaning it didn’t have before or wouldn’t have on any other body (compare his dandy or gender-bending looks with Bowie’s contemporaneous ones—there is a definitive surge of Jagger sexuality). The football pants signaled a new era of commercialism. The football pants revealed that when you took away the sex and drugs, the Stones were a band about work ethic: competitive, determined to go on the road, determined to make money, determined to keep releasing music regardless of whether they could get themselves in the studio.



Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 1, 2022 18:42

May 1982 Rehearsals












                         



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2022-01-01 21:12 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Plink ()
Date: January 1, 2022 21:23

I really enjoyed reading the football pants essay, exilestones thumbs up. Thanks for posting smiling smiley

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Plink ()
Date: January 1, 2022 21:43

My favorite '81 Keith garment was the leopard vest worn in SF @ Candlestick Park. I've seen most of this thread and don't recall Keith wearing it at any other shows. Was it a "one and done", worn only @ that SF gig?


photo by Rocky Widener, originally posted by exilestones

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 11, 2022 00:15



1982 pathe marconi

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: January 15, 2022 01:50

PHILADELPHIA


photo Lynn Goldsmith

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