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Most valuable album
Posted by: Turner ()
Date: December 20, 2011 22:29

In this video at 1:26, he talks about his most valuable album (looks like Beggars Banquet era) - what is the title?




Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: BroomWagon ()
Date: December 20, 2011 23:01

Jean Luc Goddard's Sympathy for the devil? That's the movie picture isn't it? But NO, I DO NOT KNOW, just a guess.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: His Majesty ()
Date: December 20, 2011 23:07

Quote
BroomWagon
Jean Luc Goddard's Sympathy for the devil? That's the movie picture isn't it? But NO, I DO NOT KNOW, just a guess.

The cover features a mash up of photos from early 1969.

Nothing special about that record other than the limited number of copies pressed.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Stone601 ()
Date: December 20, 2011 23:26

It's " The Promotional Album" pressed for radio station,
more details here [eil.com]

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Turner ()
Date: December 20, 2011 23:34

excellent - thanks for that! I like that track list

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: GumbootCloggeroo ()
Date: December 20, 2011 23:35

you'd think a guy with that many records would know how to hold one properly...

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Turner ()
Date: December 22, 2011 01:47

it's an old video, I wonder if he ever found a buyer?

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: treaclefingers ()
Date: December 22, 2011 09:32

Definitely the Promotional Album...I have a 'faux' version of this, as well as a couple official "Australian Version" of this.

There were only 200 pressed for the US market, for Radio stations and 200 also for the UK.

The story goes, DECCA was trying to give radio stations a promo record that highlighted songs that were not easily available to them. These songs were supposed to 'round out their 60s output, or something like that.

I've seen these sell from a few hundred to a couple of thousand on EBAY.

On the video, he says it is the most expensive record...obviously he doesn't have Street Fighting Man with the Picture Sleeve. I'm not sure how accurate he is as I'm sure there have to be some other records, Beatles records, that are worth more than that.

Interesting though...and a sad story overall.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: tatters ()
Date: December 22, 2011 14:14

Quote
treaclefingers
The story goes, DECCA was trying to give radio stations a promo record that highlighted songs that were not easily available to them. These songs were supposed to 'round out their 60s output, or something like that.

It consisted of tracks that weren't on Big Hits or Through The Past Darkly. Back in the long ago, when DJs actually spun vinyl on turntables, the idea was that between the two hits albums and the promotional album, radio stations could have all the Rolling Stones music they could ever possibly need on just three nifty disks. Saves shelf space.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2011-12-22 14:18 by tatters.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: MILKYWAY ()
Date: December 22, 2011 14:28

Isn't there a version of that LP that was commercially released by Decca?

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: tatters ()
Date: December 22, 2011 14:31

"This album has been prepared for radio stations only by The Rolling Stones as a program aid. It was felt that most stations have in their library both volumes of The Rolling Stones Hits LP's (NPS-1 And NPS-3) and that one more LP, assembled especially for radio stations, could be of great help in programming. This LP, consisting of 14 Rolling Stones selections, spans the complete recorded history of The Rolling Stones beginning with one of their earliest recordings (Route 66) and ending with a brand new selection which will be included in The Rolling Stones' next LP (Love In Vain).

This LP, then, in combination with the other two hits LPs can provide radio stations of a comprehensive history of The Rolling Stones."

Side One

Route 66 - 1964, included on The Rolling Stones
Walking The Dog - 1964, included on The Rolling Stones
Around And Around - 1964, included on 12x5
Suzie Q - 1965, included on 12x5
Everybody Needs Somebody - 1965, included on The Rolling Stones Now
Off The Hook - 1965, included on The Rolling Stones Now
I'm Free - 1965, included on Decembers Children
She Said Yeah - 1965, included on Decembers Children

Side Two

Under My Thumb - 1966, included on Aftermath
Stupid Girl - 1966, included on Aftermath
2000 Man - 1967, included on Their Satanic Majesties Request
Sympathy For The Devil - 1968, included on Beggars Banquet
Prodigal Son - 1968, included on Beggars Banquet
Love In Vain - 1969, included on Let it Bleed

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Jan Richards ()
Date: December 22, 2011 14:53

About the Promotional Album:

[www.stonesondecca.com]

Jan Richards

[www.stonesondecca.com]

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: crumbling_mice ()
Date: December 22, 2011 15:06

Are promotional albums worth more than the mass produced versions? I have a promo of Ronnies 1234, it is exactly the same as any other 1234 other than it has gold stamp on the back saying promtional copy not for re-sale.


Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Come On ()
Date: December 22, 2011 16:14

Here's also one hell of a valuable album:



and Dylan's 1st issue of The Freewheelin with 'John Birch Societh Blues' on it..

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: BroomWagon ()
Date: December 22, 2011 19:16

Quote
Come On
Here's also one hell of a valuable album:


Alright, I can relate but you left us hanging here, the John Lennon album is an obscurely labelled version of Rock 'n' Roll of course, I really like Lennon's Be Bop a Lula, there's quite a bit of Lennon I don't flip over but still a lot of stuff I find genius as well. I posted his version of Angel Baby in the Youtube thread around December 8th and the original of Angel Baby. In Lennon's song he sends his love to Rosie wherever she may be and that kind of took me back as ultra cool to do that about an oldie but goodie song, his version is pretty good too...some of the other cover versions don't come off that great.

I found this blog entry over the album Come on placed here, I had heard previously that John Lennon recorded this with something to do with a line in Come Together and how it takes from Chuck Berry or something like that. Story isn't that important to me not being a fanatic of the fab four but this discusses it. I always thought it was an urban legend type deal.

[blog.fabfourfaq2.com]

Quote

The inherent resemblance between “Come Together” and any number of Berry tunes did not escape Paul’s ever-alert ears. He gently steered John to less litigious waters by slowing the tempo, adding an electric piano lick that John described as “swampy,” and generally shaping an arrangement that John himself would declare “independent of Chuck Berry or anyone else on Earth.”

JL's R N R album, big image so I link it. [img12.nnm.ru]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2011-12-22 19:44 by BroomWagon.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: OhNoNotMeAgain ()
Date: December 22, 2011 20:43

While I can't help but feeling some sympathy for this man (and especially his wife), the fact that he's singling out the Stones' "Promotional Album" as "the store's most valuable record" seems quite odd to me. Is this really worth "$6,000 to 10,000" as he states? Although I'm not a Stones collector, I don't think so. A stellar collectable and much sought-after item, sure, but if this one is the supposed stand-out "gem" of his entire inventory, I don't think there's much else of interest in there.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: Hillside Blues ()
Date: December 22, 2011 21:00

I agree. It's not even the rarest Rolling Stones record.

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: OhNoNotMeAgain ()
Date: December 22, 2011 21:39

I'm not trying to bash the man, but here's some background info that may put things in a somewhat sobering perspective:

[captainwrong.blogspot.com]

Re: Most valuable album
Posted by: treaclefingers ()
Date: December 23, 2011 06:16

Quote
tatters
Quote
treaclefingers
The story goes, DECCA was trying to give radio stations a promo record that highlighted songs that were not easily available to them. These songs were supposed to 'round out their 60s output, or something like that.

It consisted of tracks that weren't on Big Hits or Through The Past Darkly. Back in the long ago, when DJs actually spun vinyl on turntables, the idea was that between the two hits albums and the promotional album, radio stations could have all the Rolling Stones music they could ever possibly need on just three nifty disks. Saves shelf space.

That's the story! Thanks for filling in my mental gap!



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