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Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: kid killowatt ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:02

Quote
MelBelli
Quote
kid killowatt
Quote
powerage78
3 tracks and... Keith and Ronnie taking part in a Jagger album, that's quite something !

Get close is a pure Keith riff in open g IMO

Sounds like it in the “Hold Back”/“Struggle”/“Too Tight” etc family of riffs.

Yes, and he plays a tremendous bass line in "Angry" and his signature licks and a great solo.

What Keith is doing on "Depending on You" I have no idea.....maybe just strumming chords with an acoustic.......the slide part is Ronnie of course

But I agree somehow with powerage78 that in the end, Angry and DOY are Micks songs.....but Get Close is Keith's



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 02:09 by kid killowatt.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: kid killowatt ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:06

Wondering why the first 3 tracks on the album are the ones co-written with Andrew Watt........

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: MelBelli ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:10

Mick is playing an open-G figure up high. Keith is playing an another open-G part in the open position.

But otherwise almost certainly an all-Mick tune.


What Watt brings to the table, I’m surmising, is the urgency of creating more than just one hook. One of the reasons big pop songs these days have so many writers is that they can’t be boring for even a second (even if they’re under three minutes long).

You notice that both the verses and choruses of “Angry” have B sections within them.

Same with DOY.

“Get Close” is a little more old-school. Keith comes up with three parts and Mick figures out what to do with them.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 02:11 by MelBelli.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: kid killowatt ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:14

Quote
MelBelli
“Get Close” is a little more old-school. Keith comes up with three parts and Mick figures out what to do with them.

Yeah, they usually work like that because the melody is pure Mick, the riff is unquestionably Keith's

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: tumblingdice ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:18

Ugh we. Transfer no longer active. Anyone have a new link?

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: angee ()
Date: September 14, 2023 02:35

Quote
JadedFaded
Quote
peoplewitheyes
I love this Colombian 'flash mob'-style video

¡Está Chingón!

[fb.watch]

The Stones should hire these kids for their next video. They really captured the energy of the song!

Love the dancers/flash mob! Really nice.

(Still haven't heard songs 2 and 3 either.)

~"Love is Strong"~

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: doitywoik ()
Date: September 14, 2023 04:05

Quote
doitywoik
Quote
HardRiffin
[www.noise11.com]

It's really strange they have a second new album ready!! I don't think so.

In the press conference it only sounded like Ronnie wanted to say they finished enough material for two albums. I can't recall Ronnie saying something about an imminent follow-up album in the post-PC event. On the other hand, would the author of that article totally make up something that specific?

Of course it wold be cool to hear the remaining songs rather sooner than later. Time will tell.
...

He in fact did say that one song with Macca is reserved for the next album,
here at 7:40
[youtu.be]

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Doxa ()
Date: September 14, 2023 04:39

Reading these recents comments I can say I was right that there will be a new "Slave" or "Pretty Beat Up" on the album. It is called "Get Close". The Stones do not totally ignore the taste of their hardcore fanbase.

- Doxa

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: MelBelli ()
Date: September 14, 2023 04:40

Quote
kid killowatt
Quote
MelBelli
“Get Close” is a little more old-school. Keith comes up with three parts and Mick figures out what to do with them.

Yeah, they usually work like that because the melody is pure Mick, the riff is unquestionably Keith's

It’s tough to tell due to the quality of the recordings, but verses of Get Close sound like they’re driven by Mick’s guitar, whereas Keith is more prominent in chorus and C section.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: snoopy2 ()
Date: September 14, 2023 06:15

...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 08:30 by snoopy2.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: quietbeatle ()
Date: September 14, 2023 07:17

Can anybody share another link pretty please? The vids were pulled off youtube and the wetrans is expired already. cheers

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Topi ()
Date: September 14, 2023 07:59

Sounds like Universal is reacting.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 08:06 by Topi.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: wupperstein ()
Date: September 14, 2023 11:17

I like "Get Close" more than "Depended On You", because it is a real classical
Stones song. "Depended On You" sounds like a Mick Jagger solo song.
But it's not bad!

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: NilsHolgersson ()
Date: September 14, 2023 11:54

Does anyone know why there's so much more buzz when the Rolling Stones release an album or single compared to when Mick Jagger releases a solo album or single? Everybody wants to hear Angry / Hackney Diamonds but not a lot of people were interested in England Lost or Gotta Get a Grip.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Date: September 14, 2023 11:57

Sounds like Keith has a phaser/Leslie-effect on his guitar on Get Close. Can't wait to hear it in good quality.

Three open G-songs out of three from Keith so far.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: HardRiffin ()
Date: September 14, 2023 12:23

Quote
NilsHolgersson
Does anyone know why there's so much more buzz when the Rolling Stones release an album or single compared to when Mick Jagger releases a solo album or single? Everybody wants to hear Angry / Hackney Diamonds but not a lot of people were interested in England Lost or Gotta Get a Grip.

It's very simple! Because England Lost and GGAG are poor songs!! tongue sticking out smiley

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Christiaan ()
Date: September 14, 2023 12:33

Quote
rockerparis
Quote
tumblingdice
Ugh we. Transfer no longer active. Anyone have a new link?

There is always a light at the end of the tunnel

Nice one. But in answer or reaction to tumblingdice, to my understanding we.transfer is usually for a short period, isn’t it?

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: schwonek ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:18

Don't if anyone ordered thru the German RS store (bravado): I ordered the blue vinyl and the red Angry vinyl. Today I got a package - empty. That has never happened before. In my receipt it said we will send out both vinyls in October so I was confused. For a minute I thought they made a mistake and send me the HD already.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: frankotero ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:23

That’s strange. They could have at least sent the 45.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:25

Quote
schwonek

In my receipt it said we will send out both vinyls in October so I was confused.

It's due to your order (Album + Single). From the 'Service & Help' on [www.Bravado.de] :

"Your package will not leave our warehouse until all items are available. So if you order several items and one of them is an item with a pre-order date, your complete order will only be shipped on the pre-order date mentioned. There will be no partial delivery. If you need more items sooner, we recommend that you place two separate orders."

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: GS1978 ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:27

Great article in the New York Times.
Lots of new information on the songs, great quotes & photos.

[www.nytimes.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 13:28 by GS1978.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: einte ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:40

Is it possible to post the artikel here?
I can't open the link...thanks in advance!

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:40

Quote
GS1978

Great article in the New York Times.

The Rolling Stones Start Up Again



With its first album of new songs since 2005, and first since the death of Charlie Watts, the band recharges the partnership of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Sept. 14, 2023, 5:01 a.m. ET · By Jon Pareles · Photos: Thea Traff for The New York Times

In 2022, 17 years after the Rolling Stones released their most recent album of original songs, Mick Jagger decided the band had dithered and procrastinated long enough. Sessions had come and gone; unfinished songs were stacking up. Charlie Watts, the band’s lifelong drummer and rhythmic cornerstone, had died in 2021, but the band kept on touring without new material. “No one was being the taskmaster,” Jagger recalled. “No one was saying, ‘This is the deadline.’” So the singer did just that. The result is “Hackney Diamonds,” a loud, cantankerous, unrepentant collection of new songs from a band that refuses to mellow with age.

For the new album, the sometimes fractious songwriting partnership of Jagger and Keith Richards found a way to realign. Near the end of the sessions, they even completed writing one song — “Driving Me Too Hard” — in a room together, as they had in their early years. “We’re a weird pair, man,” Richards said via video from his manager’s New York City office, surrounded by Stones merch and memorabilia. His gray hair was tucked into a headband; framed cover art of the 1981 album “Tattoo You,” with Jagger’s striated face, hung above him. “I love him dearly, and he loves me dearly, and let’s leave it at that.” Mick Jagger closes his eyes and holds both palms up to the camera, wearing a patterned shirt.

“Hackney Diamonds,” due Oct. 20, is both a new blast and a summing up. It digs into the Stones’ long-established style: sinewy guitar riffs, Jagger’s proudly intemperate vocals, bluesy underpinnings and ever-improvisatory guitar interplay. “You know, it goes like this — but maybe it could go like that,” Richards said. “Without improvisation, it wouldn’t be anything in the first place. I mean, there are no rules to rock ’n’ roll. That’s the reason it’s there.” In the band’s new songs, Jagger sings about frustration, longing, escape, endurance and transcendence. “Angry,” the album’s opener, moves between conciliation and exasperation. The punky “Bite My Head Off” — which has Paul McCartney playing a jabbing, distorted bass — barks back at someone’s attempts at control. And the wistful, countryish “Depending on You” bemoans a lost romance: “I was making love but you had different plans,” Jagger sings.

The songs are unapologetically hand-played and organic, not quantized onto a computer grid; they speed up and slow down with a human pulse. And the album honors the band’s elder-statesman status, drawing guest appearances from McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Lady Gaga and Elton John. Jagger scoffed at the idea of the Rolling Stones as an institution. “It’s only a band,” he said. But Ronnie Wood, the guitarist who joined in 1975, cherishes the band’s six decades of continuity. “That has been my thing all these years, to keep my institution going,” he said in a video interview from his apartment in Barcelona. “When Mick and Keith fell out, I’d do my best to get them together again — at least get them talking and start the engines roaring again.”

The album’s title comes from London slang. Hackney is a borough in East London that had long held a rough reputation, though it has lately gone more upscale. Wood explained that “Hackney diamonds” are bits of broken glass from car windshields after break-ins leave them, in a word, shattered. “A lot of the tracks on the album have that explosion,” Wood said. “This is a really in-your-face album.” Making the new LP, the band regained “a sense of urgency,” Jagger said via video from Paris, with paintings of elegant French gentry on the wall behind him. Of course, the longtime members of the Rolling Stones — Jagger, 80, Richards, 79, and Wood, 76 — weren’t getting any younger. “I said to Keith, ‘If we don’t have a deadline, we’re never going to finish this record,’” Jagger said. “So I said, ‘The deadline is Valentine’s Day 2023. And then we’re going to go out and tour it.’ That’s what we used to have to do. You know, you’ve got to finish ‘Exile on Main Street’ because you’ve got a tour booked.”

Even without new albums, the Stones kept touring in the 2010s and 2020s. The band had gone to studios occasionally to get started on songs, but never got around to finishing them. Meanwhile, Jagger and Richards had each amassed a backlog of new material in various stages, written separately but awaiting the band’s collaborative touches. Jagger also realized, he said, that “We need to get someone involved who can crack the whip.” That was Andrew Watt, who won a Grammy as producer of the year in 2021. Watt, 32, has made pop hits with Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber and revved up late-career albums by Ozzy Osbourne and Iggy Pop. Watt is also a guitarist and Rolling Stones fan who has studied every lick in the band’s catalog. As a producer, he was “results-oriented,” Watt said. “I was the newcomer. So I didn’t have the baggage that comes with a band that’s been together for over 60 years. There’s a lot of history between all of the people in the room, especially between Mick and Keith. So the only way I could think of how best to navigate those waters was moving quickly.”

After the years of inconclusive sessions and self-conscious second-guessing, the Stones made “Hackney Diamonds” in what Richards called “a blitzkrieg” — a matter of months instead of years. “We worked fast, but that was the idea,” he said and added, with a cackle, “I’m still recovering.” The tight recording schedule pushed aside second thoughts, Jagger said. “We do like four or five takes. ‘OK,’ and we move on,” he said. “So no one had time to really think, ‘Well, was this a good song? Should we be doing this song?’ Because I get introspective, you know. Is this song as good as the other one? Is this song like another one I’ve done? You can figure that out later. Let’s keep moving.” At the recording sessions, Watt was an enthusiast as well as a critical listener. The album was made in Paris, New York City, the Bahamas, London and, primarily, Los Angeles, a convenient magnet for the album’s guest stars. Every day in the studio, Watt wore tour T-shirts from shows by the Stones and its spinoff bands like Richards’s X-Pensive Winos and Wood’s New Barbarians. He also sourced vintage equipment. A clear Plexiglas Dan Armstrong guitar, like the one Richards had played on “Midnight Rambler,” delivers the caustic riff of “Whole Wide World,” as Jagger sings about pushing past bad options, declaring, “You think the party’s over/when it’s only just begun.”

For the band members, the most crucial part of the Rolling Stones sound is what Richards calls “weaving” — the ever-changing, spur-of-the-moment interplay between the instruments, particularly the guitars. The band recorded the core of most of the songs together in the studio, playing off one another as they would onstage. For nearly every track, Watt placed Richards’s guitars on the left and Wood’s on the right — the opposite of what a concertgoer would see, but the way the band would hear itself onstage. “I wanted it to sound huge,” he said. “Because they are larger than life. They’re the [expletive] Stones. When you listen to this album you should picture the Stones playing in a stadium, because that’s what they are.”

Wood, who shares the tangle of guitar lines with Richards and Jagger, said, “Once the band gets together and that magic starts to happen, then who knows where it could go?” A tour was put off, delayed by the lag in pressing vinyl and by stadiums already booked for Beyoncé and Taylor Swift tours. But the album got done; it was indeed recorded, though not fully mixed, by Feb. 14. Jagger said, “I think we got along on this record really well. Of course we have disagreements about how things should be, but I think that’s pretty normal. I sometimes feel that Keith thinks I like everything too fast. But I know how fast they should be, because I’m completely a groove person.” So is Richards. “Rhythm is the most important thing in your goddamn life,” Richards said. “A lot of what you hear ain’t what you hear — it’s what you feel. And that’s a matter of rhythm.”

The Stones groove got its foundation from Watts, who died at 80. “There would have been a Rolling Stones without Charlie Watts, but without Charlie Watts there wouldn’t have been the Rolling Stones,” Richards said. “He was one of the warmest guys I ever, ever met, just so tolerant of other people. He would actually stop me from murdering people. When I just thought his name, I started to weep. Thanks for bringing me to tears.” Watts’s final full album with the band was “Blue & Lonesome,” a set of blues covers, in 2016. But Watts’s drumming, from sessions with the Stones’ previous producer Don Was, drives two songs on “Hackney Diamonds.” One of them, “Live by the Sword,” also includes the Stones’ retired original bassist, Bill Wyman, and some two-fisted honky-tonk piano from Elton John. When Watts grew too frail to perform, the Rolling Stones continued touring with a new drummer: Steve Jordan, whom Watts had recommended to Richards in the 1980s when Richards started the X-Pensive Winos.

“Charlie was like a fireworks display, and Steve is like a train.” Wood said. “With the passing of Charlie and the baton handed over to Steve Jordan from Charlie, that was a very special moment. We were rehearsing in Boston when Charlie actually passed away. We were rehearsing when we heard the news, and we had one day off. And we thought, Charlie didn’t want us to sit around and mope and everything. We went straight back to the grindstone and carried on — kept the flame going.” For the Rolling Stones, “Hackney Diamonds” is the beginning of the band’s next phase. “With Charlie leaving us, I think we needed to make a new mark with Steve,” Richards said. “To reset the band was important.” Jagger said, “I don’t think it’s the last Rolling Stones album. We’ve got almost three-quarters through the next one.” But the final group of songs on “Hackney Diamonds” hints at an alternate story. Richards sings lead on “Tell Me Straight,” a weary-voiced, introspective ballad that contemplates endings. “I need an answer/How long can this last?,” he sings. “Don’t make me wait/Is my future all in my past?”

It’s followed by “Sweet Sounds of Heaven,” a gospel-charged song about music as salvation, stoked by Stevie Wonder on keyboards. “Let us sing, let us shout/Let us all stand up proud/Let the old still believe that they’re young,” Jagger and an exuberant Lady Gaga sing, pushing each other to one peak and then, after a pause, restarting the groove as a studio jam that reaches even higher — an ecstatic climax to the album. But then there’s an epilogue: a Jagger-Richards duet on the Muddy Waters blues that gave the band its name: “Rolling Stone Blues.” “It’s just Jagger’s voice and harmonica and Richards’s guitar, unadorned in real time, circling back to the love of the blues that brought them together as teenagers. It could be a career postscript or a reaffirmation. “There were six takes total,” Watt said. “The one that made the record is take four. And as they went through each take, they moved closer and closer together. Closer and closer.”



[www.NYTimes.com] - "A version of this article appears in print on Sept. 17, 2023, Section AR, Page 44 of the New York edition with the headline: Just More Proof They’ll Never Stop." - Order NY Times reprints.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2023-09-14 15:20 by Irix.

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:42

a loud, cantankerous, unrepentant collection of new songs


Hey man I like that .........



ROCKMAN

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Date: September 14, 2023 13:43

GivenToFly, Now you can see it

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:52

Fanks Irix ..... Its a good read .....



ROCKMAN

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: HardRiffin ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:53

Quote
Irix
Quote
GS1978

Great article in the New York Times.

The Rolling Stones Start Up Again

With its first album of new songs since 2005, and first since the death of Charlie Watts, the band recharges the partnership of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Sept. 14, 2023, 5:01 a.m. ET

In 2022, 17 years after the Rolling Stones released their most recent album of original songs, Mick Jagger decided the band had dithered and procrastinated long enough. Sessions had come and gone; unfinished songs were stacking up. Charlie Watts, the band’s lifelong drummer and rhythmic cornerstone, had died in 2021, but the band kept on touring without new material. “No one was being the taskmaster,” Jagger recalled. “No one was saying, ‘This is the deadline.’” So the singer did just that. The result is “Hackney Diamonds,” a loud, cantankerous, unrepentant collection of new songs from a band that refuses to mellow with age. For the new album, the sometimes fractious songwriting partnership of Jagger and Keith Richards found a way to realign. Near the end of the sessions, they even completed writing one song — “Driving Me Too Hard” — in a room together, as they had in their early years.

“We’re a weird pair, man,” Richards said via video from his manager’s New York City office, surrounded by Stones merch and memorabilia. His gray hair was tucked into a headband; framed cover art of the 1981 album “Tattoo You,” with Jagger’s striated face, hung above him. “I love him dearly, and he loves me dearly, and let’s leave it at that.” Mick Jagger closes his eyes and holds both palms up to the camera, wearing a patterned shirt. Making the new LP, the band regained “a sense of urgency,” Jagger said.Thea Traff for The New York Times
“Hackney Diamonds,” due Oct. 20, is both a new blast and a summing up. It digs into the Stones’ long-established style: sinewy guitar riffs, Jagger’s proudly intemperate vocals, bluesy underpinnings and ever-improvisatory guitar interplay.

“You know, it goes like this — but maybe it could go like that,” Richards said. “Without improvisation, it wouldn’t be anything in the first place. I mean, there are no rules to rock ’n’ roll. That’s the reason it’s there.” In the band’s new songs, Jagger sings about frustration, longing, escape, endurance and transcendence. “Angry,” the album’s opener, moves between conciliation and exasperation. The punky “Bite My Head Off” — which has Paul McCartney playing a jabbing, distorted bass — barks back at someone’s attempts at control. And the wistful, countryish “Depending on You” bemoans a lost romance: “I was making love but you had different plans,” Jagger sings.

The songs are unapologetically hand-played and organic, not quantized onto a computer grid; they speed up and slow down with a human pulse. And the album honors the band’s elder-statesman status, drawing guest appearances from McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Lady Gaga and Elton John. Jagger scoffed at the idea of the Rolling Stones as an institution. “It’s only a band,” he said. But Ronnie Wood, the guitarist who joined in 1975, cherishes the band’s six decades of continuity. “That has been my thing all these years, to keep my institution going,” he said in a video interview from his apartment in Barcelona. “When Mick and Keith fell out, I’d do my best to get them together again — at least get them talking and start the engines roaring again.”

The album’s title comes from London slang. Hackney is a borough in East London that had long held a rough reputation, though it has lately gone more upscale. Wood explained that “Hackney diamonds” are bits of broken glass from car windshields after break-ins leave them, in a word, shattered. “A lot of the tracks on the album have that explosion,” Wood said. “This is a really in-your-face album.” Making the new LP, the band regained “a sense of urgency,” Jagger said via video from Paris, with paintings of elegant French gentry on the wall behind him. Of course, the longtime members of the Rolling Stones — Jagger, 80, Richards, 79, and Wood, 76 — weren’t getting any younger. “I said to Keith, ‘If we don’t have a deadline, we’re never going to finish this record,’” Jagger said. “So I said, ‘The deadline is Valentine’s Day 2023. And then we’re going to go out and tour it.’ That’s what we used to have to do. You know, you’ve got to finish ‘Exile on Main Street’ because you’ve got a tour booked.”

Even without new albums, the Stones kept touring in the 2010s and 2020s. The band had gone to studios occasionally to get started on songs, but never got around to finishing them. Meanwhile, Jagger and Richards had each amassed a backlog of new material in various stages, written separately but awaiting the band’s collaborative touches. Jagger also realized, he said, that “We need to get someone involved who can crack the whip.” That was Andrew Watt, who won a Grammy as producer of the year in 2021. Watt, 32, has made pop hits with Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber and revved up late-career albums by Ozzy Osbourne and Iggy Pop. Watt is also a guitarist and Rolling Stones fan who has studied every lick in the band’s catalog. As a producer, he was “results-oriented,” Watt said. “I was the newcomer. So I didn’t have the baggage that comes with a band that’s been together for over 60 years. There’s a lot of history between all of the people in the room, especially between Mick and Keith. So the only way I could think of how best to navigate those waters was moving quickly.”

After the years of inconclusive sessions and self-conscious second-guessing, the Stones made “Hackney Diamonds” in what Richards called “a blitzkrieg” — a matter of months instead of years. “We worked fast, but that was the idea,” he said and added, with a cackle, “I’m still recovering.” The tight recording schedule pushed aside second thoughts, Jagger said. “We do like four or five takes. ‘OK,’ and we move on,” he said. “So no one had time to really think, ‘Well, was this a good song? Should we be doing this song?’ Because I get introspective, you know. Is this song as good as the other one? Is this song like another one I’ve done? You can figure that out later. Let’s keep moving.” At the recording sessions, Watt was an enthusiast as well as a critical listener. The album was made in Paris, New York City, the Bahamas, London and, primarily, Los Angeles, a convenient magnet for the album’s guest stars. Every day in the studio, Watt wore tour T-shirts from shows by the Stones and its spinoff bands like Richards’s X-Pensive Winos and Wood’s New Barbarians. He also sourced vintage equipment. A clear Plexiglas Dan Armstrong guitar, like the one Richards had played on “Midnight Rambler,” delivers the caustic riff of “Whole Wide World,” as Jagger sings about pushing past bad options, declaring, “You think the party’s over/when it’s only just begun.”

For the band members, the most crucial part of the Rolling Stones sound is what Richards calls “weaving” — the ever-changing, spur-of-the-moment interplay between the instruments, particularly the guitars. The band recorded the core of most of the songs together in the studio, playing off one another as they would onstage. For nearly every track, Watt placed Richards’s guitars on the left and Wood’s on the right — the opposite of what a concertgoer would see, but the way the band would hear itself onstage. “I wanted it to sound huge,” he said. “Because they are larger than life. They’re the [expletive] Stones. When you listen to this album you should picture the Stones playing in a stadium, because that’s what they are.”

Wood, who shares the tangle of guitar lines with Richards and Jagger, said, “Once the band gets together and that magic starts to happen, then who knows where it could go?” A tour was put off, delayed by the lag in pressing vinyl and by stadiums already booked for Beyoncé and Taylor Swift tours. But the album got done; it was indeed recorded, though not fully mixed, by Feb. 14. Jagger said, “I think we got along on this record really well. Of course we have disagreements about how things should be, but I think that’s pretty normal. I sometimes feel that Keith thinks I like everything too fast. But I know how fast they should be, because I’m completely a groove person.” So is Richards. “Rhythm is the most important thing in your goddamn life,” Richards said. “A lot of what you hear ain’t what you hear — it’s what you feel. And that’s a matter of rhythm.”

The Stones groove got its foundation from Watts, who died at 80. “There would have been a Rolling Stones without Charlie Watts, but without Charlie Watts there wouldn’t have been the Rolling Stones,” Richards said. “He was one of the warmest guys I ever, ever met, just so tolerant of other people. He would actually stop me from murdering people. When I just thought his name, I started to weep. Thanks for bringing me to tears.” Watts’s final full album with the band was “Blue & Lonesome,” a set of blues covers, in 2016. But Watts’s drumming, from sessions with the Stones’ previous producer Don Was, drives two songs on “Hackney Diamonds.” One of them, “Live by the Sword,” also includes the Stones’ retired original bassist, Bill Wyman, and some two-fisted honky-tonk piano from Elton John. When Watts grew too frail to perform, the Rolling Stones continued touring with a new drummer: Steve Jordan, whom Watts had recommended to Richards in the 1980s when Richards started the X-Pensive Winos.

“Charlie was like a fireworks display, and Steve is like a train.” Wood said. “With the passing of Charlie and the baton handed over to Steve Jordan from Charlie, that was a very special moment. We were rehearsing in Boston when Charlie actually passed away. We were rehearsing when we heard the news, and we had one day off. And we thought, Charlie didn’t want us to sit around and mope and everything. We went straight back to the grindstone and carried on — kept the flame going.” For the Rolling Stones, “Hackney Diamonds” is the beginning of the band’s next phase. “With Charlie leaving us, I think we needed to make a new mark with Steve,” Richards said. “To reset the band was important.” Jagger said, “I don’t think it’s the last Rolling Stones album. We’ve got almost three-quarters through the next one.” But the final group of songs on “Hackney Diamonds” hints at an alternate story. Richards sings lead on “Tell Me Straight,” a weary-voiced, introspective ballad that contemplates endings. “I need an answer/How long can this last?,” he sings. “Don’t make me wait/Is my future all in my past?”

It’s followed by “Sweet Sounds of Heaven,” a gospel-charged song about music as salvation, stoked by Stevie Wonder on keyboards. “Let us sing, let us shout/Let us all stand up proud/Let the old still believe that they’re young,” Jagger and an exuberant Lady Gaga sing, pushing each other to one peak and then, after a pause, restarting the groove as a studio jam that reaches even higher — an ecstatic climax to the album. But then there’s an epilogue: a Jagger-Richards duet on the Muddy Waters blues that gave the band its name: “Rolling Stone Blues.” “It’s just Jagger’s voice and harmonica and Richards’s guitar, unadorned in real time, circling back to the love of the blues that brought them together as teenagers. It could be a career postscript or a reaffirmation. “There were six takes total,” Watt said. “The one that made the record is take four. And as they went through each take, they moved closer and closer together. Closer and closer.”

[www.NYTimes.com]

Many thanks smileys with beer

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: LorenzAgain ()
Date: September 14, 2023 13:54

Jagger said, “I don’t think it’s the last Rolling Stones album. We’ve got almost three-quarters through the next one.”

Yes!

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: Topi ()
Date: September 14, 2023 14:06

Interestingly, the article also says:

"A tour was put off, delayed by the lag in pressing vinyl and by stadiums already booked for Beyoncé and Taylor Swift tours"

Re: Hackney Diamonds - New Rolling Stones album due out Oct 20
Posted by: schwonek ()
Date: September 14, 2023 14:37

Quote
Irix
Quote
schwonek

In my receipt it said we will send out both vinyls in October so I was confused.

It's due to your order (Album + Single). From the 'Service & Help' on [www.Bravado.de] :

"Your package will not leave our warehouse until all items are available. So if you order several items and one of them is an item with a pre-order date, your complete order will only be shipped on the pre-order date mentioned. There will be no partial delivery. If you need more items sooner, we recommend that you place two separate orders."

Yes I know. So why send me an empty package? I just don't get it.

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