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Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 16:19

I know the version of LIV on Ya Yas is the one that everyone knows and loves, but to my ears the Stones simply played this song better in 1972 and 1978. Whether it was Mick Taylor’s more adventurous leads and Bobby Keyes and Jim Price’s killer Stax-style horns in the former, or Ronnie’s down home steel guitar and Stu’s country piano and Mac’s gospel organ (not to mention Keith’s gloriously ragged tone from his Newman Mahogany Tele) in the latter, but the 1972 and 1978
performances of LIV slay the version on Ya Yas. Sacrilege I know, since Ya Yas is what made their cover a Stones classic, but I think the versions from 1972 and 1978 sound killer.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: LeonidP ()
Date: August 12, 2021 16:46

I almost agree. I prefer 1972 over 1978, but yes, 1978 also tops Ya Yas ... and don't get me wrong, I also love Ya Yas version! It's just a great song, studio included, and it was probably their best ever choice of a cover!

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: TravelinMan ()
Date: August 12, 2021 17:28

There are some pretty hot versions in 1970 and ‘71 as well.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 17:56

Quote
LeonidP
I almost agree. I prefer 1972 over 1978, but yes, 1978 also tops Ya Yas ... and don't get me wrong, I also love Ya Yas version! It's just a great song, studio included, and it was probably their best ever choice of a cover!

Thanks LeonidP! I agree: for a band that has a PLETHORA of great covers, LIV is one their greatest achievements (since they made it their own arraignment but still gave plenty of respect to Robert Johnson's original).

Also, since I posted, I realized I gave the impression I hate the versions from 1969. The contrary is actually true: I enjoy the one on Ya Yas, and the version on Live'R Than You'll Ever Be is one of my all-time favorites. I just think the performances from 1972 and 1978 are perfect.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 18:14

Quote
TravelinMan
There are some pretty hot versions in 1970 and ‘71 as well.

I admit I'm not nearly as familiar with 1970 and 1971 as I am with the other tours. But I do like the version from Leeds 1971. A nice laid-back country porch feel.

There are some good versions from the 1973 Pacific tour as well.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: August 12, 2021 18:48

Nothing could top the 1972 performance from Ft Worth on the Ladies and Gentlemen movie. Taylor's blues solos are as great as any on recordvideo: [youtu.be]

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: GivenToFly15 ()
Date: August 12, 2021 19:05

Nothing is better than 1971. Listen to Leeds. Taylor shines.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Date: August 12, 2021 19:36

This is my favourite version, Taylor's solos are delicious. Thanks to Kleermaker. thumbs up




Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: LiveAtHidepark ()
Date: August 12, 2021 19:52

I prefer the 1969 Taylor solos, simple and perfect. I think he is overplaying in 1972.

On the other side, the horns arrangements in 1972 are pure beauty. Listen to "Welcome To New York".

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: dcba ()
Date: August 12, 2021 20:13

Quote
LiveAtHidepark
I prefer the 1969 Taylor solos, simple and perfect. I think he is overplaying in 1972.

thumbs up

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: August 12, 2021 21:02

Quote
dcba
Quote
LiveAtHidepark
I prefer the 1969 Taylor solos, simple and perfect. I think he is overplaying in 1972.

thumbs up
And I prefer Brian Jones guitar playing at the Rock n Roll Circus over Keith, since Keith is overplaying. Everyone can have their opinion , but how anyone can say his playing on the Love in Vain 1972 Ft Worth show is overplayiong and not brillant is like saying Bach overplays

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 21:29

Quote
Taylor1
Nothing could top the 1972 performance from Ft Worth on the Ladies and Gentlemen movie. Taylor's blues solos are as great as any on recordvideo: [youtu.be]

I think the version in L&G is from Houston. But that said, if I had to choose my all-time favorite version of LIV, it's a tie between the two Fort Worth shows on the 1972 tour. They're majestic. Just majestic.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 21:30

Quote
TheflyingDutchman
This is my favourite version, Taylor's solos are delicious. Thanks to Kleermaker. thumbs up




What show is this from?

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Date: August 12, 2021 21:32

Essen 1970, "ice cream in the foyer".

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: August 12, 2021 21:35

Quote
TheflyingDutchman
Essen 1970, "ice cream in the foyer".

Thanks FlyingDutchman!!

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: yearsinthemaking ()
Date: August 12, 2021 23:19

Sometimes I'll pick a song and play numerous versions over and over. I've done that with LIV many times. The highlight to me of all of the 1978 versions is Ian Stewart's piano on Garden State '78. The piano is mixed in so far out front and it has such a amazing small club feel to it unlike any other version. Nicki also has a great mix on the Welcome to NY version that is stronger than the other '72 mixes

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Date: August 12, 2021 23:57

I like the outtake where they play it Robert Johnson-style from 1969.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: xke38 ()
Date: August 13, 2021 00:11

Quote
stevecardi
Quote
Taylor1
Nothing could top the 1972 performance from Ft Worth on the Ladies and Gentlemen movie. Taylor's blues solos are as great as any on recordvideo: [youtu.be]

I think the version in L&G is from Houston. But that said, if I had to choose my all-time favorite version of LIV, it's a tie between the two Fort Worth shows on the 1972 tour. They're majestic. Just majestic.

Exactly. The '72 outro versions demonstrate what a perfectly composed and phrased guitar solo should sound like (and work even better in combination with the first, slide guitar, solo, as well as the horns).

Perth from '73 is another great version.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: August 13, 2021 00:41

Quote
DandelionPowderman
I like the outtake where they play it Robert Johnson-style from 1969.
That has none of the emotional power of the 1972 performances.The Johnson version is a feeling of resignation.Whereas the 1972 version captures the angst of the story.How anyone cannot see the brilliance of Taylor’s solos,especially the second,is beyond me.I love a lot of Ron Woods work, and on some tracks,like Tumbling Dice, I like his versions better than the ones with Taylor.But to say his Love in Vains are definitive is silly



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-13 04:08 by Taylor1.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: ProfessorWolf ()
Date: August 13, 2021 00:48

i love any ronnie version from any 78 show most
but would love to hear what it sounded like at the echoplex in 2013 with both ronnie & taylor on it anyone who was there could you share your opinions and memories

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Pietro ()
Date: August 13, 2021 04:56

Thanks for posting this. You had me going back to the Ya-Yas version, which I haven't listened to in a long time. I like the straightforward simplicity of the 1969 recording.

Still, no matter, the 1972 Ladies and Gentlemen version is my favorite.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: jbwelda ()
Date: August 13, 2021 08:00

have to agree with the simplicity of the earlier versions, 69 in particular. Kind of overplaying later but as pointed out, some scorchers later on too. I definitely prefer Taylor to Ronnie on this song but Ronnie pulls it out sometimes too. And gotta agree on the piano there in Passaic 78, so much of the Stones music is piano driven and that is an excellent, if maybe accidental, example of it.

I do love the purity of Robt Johnsons original, especially his double playing the guitar, running rhythm under his lead lines. Pretty f'in brill.

jb

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: August 13, 2021 08:08

Blind Lemon Jefferson - Dry Southern Blues 1929

My mind leads me to take a trip down south
My mind leads me to take a trip down south
Take a trip down south and stop at a fatmouth's house

One train's at the depot with the red and blue lights behind
One train's at the depot with the red and blue lights behind
Well, the blue light's the blues, the red light's the worried mind


I hate to tell you, sugar, it t'ain't nobody there
I hate to tell you, sugar, it t'ain't nobody there
If a man stay here, he'll stay most anywhere

I got up this mornin', ramblin' for my shoes
I got up this mornin', ramblin' for my shoes
The little woman said to me, 'It's all the world-weary blues'

Uncle Sam was no woman, but didn't he draft your man?
Uncle Sam was no woman, but didn't he draft your man?
Tell me them good-lookin' womens on the border's raisin' sand.

Well, women on the border's drinkin' over the water trough
Well, women on the border's drinkin' over the water trough
I wished Uncle Sam would hurry up and pay these soldiers off

I can't drink coffee and the woman won't make no tea
I can't drink coffee and the woman won't make no tea
I believe to my soul sweet mama gonna hoodoo me

I asked the girl did she love me, said, 'Lemon, I don't know how'
I asked the girl did she love me, said, 'Lemon, I don't know how'
Caught me commentatin', 'Yes, I love you sky high'

She had feet like a monkey, head like a teddy bear
She had feet like a monkey, head like a teddy bear
And a mouth full of lip, I guarantees it's everywhere.

I've got a girl in Cuba, I've got a girl in Spain
I've got a girl in Cuba, I've got a girl in Spain
I've got a brownie yonder in Dallas, I'm afraid to call her name



ROCKMAN

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: jbwelda ()
Date: August 13, 2021 08:15

Yep there is hardly anything truly original, even back then. Lots of cross pollination. Blind Lemon probably plucked it from a Bible verse or Negro spiritual.

jb

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: August 13, 2021 08:26

eeeeeerrrr cant recall any mention
of any steam trains in the old testament ......HHHHaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa



ROCKMAN

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Date: August 13, 2021 08:32

Quote
Taylor1
Quote
DandelionPowderman
I like the outtake where they play it Robert Johnson-style from 1969.
That has none of the emotional power of the 1972 performances.The Johnson version is a feeling of resignation.Whereas the 1972 version captures the angst of the story.How anyone cannot see the brilliance of Taylor’s solos,especially the second,is beyond me.I love a lot of Ron Woods work, and on some tracks,like Tumbling Dice, I like his versions better than the ones with Taylor.But to say his Love in Vains are definitive is silly

I don't know why you bring in Ronnie when we're talking about the 'Johnson-ish version'? A feeling of resignation? They were trying it out that way before they countrified it for Let It Bleed. Listen here:

[www.dropbox.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-13 10:58 by DandelionPowderman.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: Doxa ()
Date: August 13, 2021 10:39

"Love in Vain" is one of those songs the Stones never can do much wrong with. I mean, is there any actually 'bad' version of it, no matter when they did it (there might be, but I can't really remember any now - it could be that I have skipped those a long time ago and my memory is limited). No matter how the rest of the gig goes, when they get to play that one, they seem to concentrate and sound awesome, clicking with each other. That's strange because the song is a pretty delicated and fragile piece, deep stuff to play, that is, slow as hell, asking a right feel, and no way to hide any f..kups.

Just thinking of the ones I most listen - say, YA-YA'S ´69, Leeds '71, Ladies and Gents '72, Texas '78 - I think each of them is perfect by its own means. With that I mean that when I listen any of them I don't hear anything missing or thinking 'that and that should played better or somehow otherwise'. Any choice - say, arrangements, guitar solos, Mick's vocals - just sounds apt in that very context. And when talking about perfection it is useless to put them in any order of preference. The best is the one I happen to listen at the moment...

- Doxa



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-13 10:47 by Doxa.

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: MadMax ()
Date: August 13, 2021 10:43

That Ft Worth performance in 1972 is number one for me, then I'd have '78 over 69. Taylor is just amazing in '72, first a slide solo and then on the second one I think he skips the slide (ne-c'est pas?) for all to reach nirvana a 2nd time. Pure Magic

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Posted by: GivenToFly15 ()
Date: August 13, 2021 10:57

Speaking of angst, the Roundhouse 1971 features a furious Jagger - as well as great licks from Taylor (although not as perfect as the raw Leeds version).

Re: Love in Vain: 1969 vs 1972 and 1978
Date: August 13, 2021 11:33

Quote
Doxa
"Love in Vain" is one of those songs the Stones never can do much wrong with. I mean, is there any actually 'bad' version of it, no matter when they did it (there might be, but I can't really remember any now - it could be that I have skipped those a long time ago and my memory is limited). No matter how the rest of the gig goes, when they get to play that one, they seem to concentrate and sound awesome, clicking with each other. That's strange because the song is a pretty delicated and fragile piece, deep stuff to play, that is, slow as hell, asking a right feel, and no way to hide any f..kups.

Just thinking of the ones I most listen - say, YA-YA'S ´69, Leeds '71, Ladies and Gents '72, Texas '78 - I think each of them is perfect by its own means. With that I mean that when I listen any of them I don't hear anything missing or thinking 'that and that should played better or somehow otherwise'. Any choice - say, arrangements, guitar solos, Mick's vocals - just sounds apt in that very context. And when talking about perfection it is useless to put them in any order of preference. The best is the one I happen to listen at the moment...

- Doxa

I agree on most of that. The basics, Charlie, Bill, Keith and Jagger is always there. The only real variable is the two guitar solos that's also heard on the Let it Bleed version with Rye Cooder doing his studio work, and later played live by Taylor or Wood. I have also listened to the original by Robert Johnson again. This version has a pureness that cannot be topped even by the Rolling Stones. They never lived in negro misery. Different times; slightly different vibe if I noticed it well.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-13 12:01 by TheflyingDutchman.

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