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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Nate ()
Date: February 16, 2021 20:50

Quote
LeonidP
Quote
Nate
I haven’t seen my friends for months I haven’t traveled since October I haven’t seen a concert for over a year I haven’t been to a restaurant for months and many other things that I and many other people around the world enjoy have all been taken away...

Only if you choose to have them taken away. I am still doing all these things ... not so much the concerts, though our town did have bands playing every weekend in the main part of town, outdoors, in the two months between Thanksgiving and New Year's - so we did attend most of those. It was pretty cool, they had local bars serving drinks in outdoor canopies, so you could drink too .. although some of the days it was very cold!!

We go out every weekend, mostly to a restaurant, but we have hosted ...and been to other peoples homes as well. You don't have to accept isolation for the rest of your life.

Be careful, but live!

I have been staying away from other people because Covid went bananas here over Christmas and into the new year so I wanted to keep others and myself safe.
Now the numbers here are getting better and in my town it’s virtually non existent so I will see friends again soon but hospitality won’t be opening up here for another couple of months yet.

Nate

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: LeonidP ()
Date: February 16, 2021 21:07

Quote
grzegorz67
Quote
LeonidP
Quote
Nate
I haven’t seen my friends for months I haven’t traveled since October I haven’t seen a concert for over a year I haven’t been to a restaurant for months and many other things that I and many other people around the world enjoy have all been taken away...

Only if you choose to have them taken away. I am still doing all these things ... not so much the concerts, though our town did have bands playing every weekend in the main part of town, outdoors, in the two months between Thanksgiving and New Year's - so we did attend most of those. It was pretty cool, they had local bars serving drinks in outdoor canopies, so you could drink too .. although some of the days it was very cold!!

We go out every weekend, mostly to a restaurant, but we have hosted ...and been to other peoples homes as well. You don't have to accept isolation for the rest of your life.

Be careful, but live!

None of these things are currently possible anywhere in the UK. We have a lockdown here, across all 4 UK nations. No live music, restaurants or pubs are open.

thumbs up

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: michaelried ()
Date: February 16, 2021 21:20

I hope we can see the Stones live on stage on their 60. jubilee.
That would be very good expectations

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: February 16, 2021 22:38

I have my first vaccination this Sunday, 21 February. For those here who’ve had it: how was the experience? I’m used to needles, unfortunately, but this is a most important jab.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: February 16, 2021 22:56

Quote
Big Al
I have my first vaccination this Sunday, 21 February. For those here who’ve had it: how was the experience? I’m used to needles, unfortunately, but this is a most important jab.

Had the first jab (Pfizer), easiest shot I ever received.. honestly was surprised when she said it was done winking smiley
Very mild discomfort in the shot area afterwards for a day or so.

Scheduled for my second one tomorrow. It's my understanding that the second one commonly induces more of a reaction- nausea, body aches, etc., for 12-24 hrs.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: February 16, 2021 23:14

All went smoothly for me and I didn't even feel the jab! I had the AstraZeneca. The only real after-effect was that I woke up in the middle of the night - about 12 hours after I'd had the vaccine - and it was 4-5 hours before I was able to get back to sleep. A friend also had the same experience. I am not an insomniac but I imagine that's what insomnia must be like.

Apart from that, I had a weird throbbing sensation on my left temple for a couple of days, but it came and went very quickly each time I had it and wasn't painful. From what I gather, any after-effects are likely to be worse after the second dose.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: February 16, 2021 23:19

Good news beast ......

Stay safe won't ya ..... XXXX



ROCKMAN

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Aquamarine ()
Date: February 16, 2021 23:38

I had the first shot (Pfizer) last week, didn't feel a thing, arm sore for a few days. I think as people are saying it's the reaction to the second one that's more significant, though friends have said they had no significant reaction to the second dose, either.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Date: February 16, 2021 23:46

Thanks to everyone providing updates on receiving the vaccine. Please continue to let us know of any side effects.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: crawdaddy ()
Date: February 17, 2021 03:17

Had my jab about a week ago at Epsom racecourse and wanted to get my daily exercise, and was about the coldest day this winter.
Felt good about walking there and was uphill a bit to get there,but a doddle to get back home and done it in less than half hour.
Most people were driving there, but all very easy to get sorted out and lots of local volunteers I recognised that were helping out.
Had the jab by a lovely young lady after about 15 minutes waiting, and because I was not driving could leave straight away.
You get a card with details of the jab which was Astra Zeneca,and the leaflet that gives you all the information you need.
If you were driving,you had to sit down for another 15 minutes.
No problems at all since the jab,and was really impressed with how efficient and straightforward the whole procedure was.

God Bless our NHS here in UK. smileys with beer

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: February 17, 2021 08:40

Thank you for the insight, everyone! thumbs up

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Green Lady ()
Date: February 17, 2021 15:22

The jab (Pfizer) was no problem and I was in and out in less than half an hour including the mandatory 15 minutes wait in case I had an allergic reaction. But I and others I know did feel very tired and lethargic next day. That was about a month ago and I am waiting to see when I get offered my second shot.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: steffialicia ()
Date: February 17, 2021 15:28

Quote
makemeburnthecandle
Thanks to everyone providing updates on receiving the vaccine. Please continue to let us know of any side effects.

Had my first Moderna shot on February 11. Very mild side effects. Slightly sore arm, tired, a low grade headache. All was well the day after.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: daspyknows ()
Date: February 17, 2021 17:48

Quote
steffialicia
Quote
makemeburnthecandle
Thanks to everyone providing updates on receiving the vaccine. Please continue to let us know of any side effects.

Had my first Moderna shot on February 11. Very mild side effects. Slightly sore arm, tired, a low grade headache. All was well the day after.

Glad to hear it. One down, one to go.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: February 17, 2021 17:59

Quote
Rockman
Good news beast ......

Stay safe won't ya ..... XXXX

Hey - thanks, Rockeeeee, and the same goes to you! xox

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: bv ()
Date: February 17, 2021 22:01

About variants and vaccine. The following is based on information as provided by Norwegian health experts (fhi.no).

The variants have been around in UK, South Africa, Ireland, Portugal and other places in Europe for some months now. They make people more aware of keeping a distance, and to mask up. We started getting the UK and SA variants in Norway last month, now it is routine to close down a county whenever these are detected. There was a shift in awareness the moment we were told the variants were here.

The vaccines are not as effective when it comes to the variants, but the vaccines will still work, preventing serious illness. While most vaccines prevent even mild illness, the variants will make you slightly more ill before the variant is detected by the immune system. Then the vaccine will work with the immune system and prevent serious illness most times. This is measured in UK, South Africa and Israel.

We will need new covid-19 vaccine shots every two years or so, not as often as with the annual flu, but more often than once in a lifetime, or once every ten years, which is the case with other vaccines.

The great thing about the mRNA vaccines is the fact that they may be modified within few months, they do not have to go through a year of testing and new approvals.

Warmer weather will make it easier to stay outside, and to be social outside. By summer, more people have vaccine, we may enjoy a beer outside, and after summer, enough people have vaccine, so that the health system will not go into overload whenever some stupid non-vaccinated people choose to party. The virus will probably never go away.

A am not too worries about 2021, we just need to get through the spring. Summer will be great, fall will be even greater. Then The Rolling Stones should be able to tour and release new music in 2022.

Bjornulf

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: February 18, 2021 00:31

Lab studies suggest Pfizer, Moderna vaccines can protect against coronavirus variant

CNN). A new report published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday suggests that Pfizer-BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine can protect people against concerning new coronavirus variants, including one first seen in South Africa called B.1.351.

For the study, researchers at Pfizer and the University of Texas Medical Branch genetically engineered versions of the virus to carry some of the mutations found in B.1.351. They tested them against blood samples taken from 15 people who had received two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine as part of a clinical trial.
While the blood serum samples produced less neutralizing antibody activity, it was still enough to neutralize the virus, they wrote in a letter to the journal.
This is in line with other studies. And it's well within what is seen with other viruses, one of the researchers said.
[www.cnn.com]

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: JadedFaded ()
Date: February 18, 2021 01:37

My 90 and 91 year old parents, who I take care of, got their second COVID vaccinations today. This is a big relief for me as I have been terrified of bringing COVID home to them. I am very careful, but it was always a worry for me.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: February 18, 2021 03:01

Interesting article on vaccine technology.

“It’s likely we’ll see another pandemic in the next 20 years”: The Toronto scientist who invented the Covid vaccine technology says we need to prepare for the next virus

[torontolife.com]

Back when he was a high school student in Scarborough, Derrick Rossi predicted that a virus would someday bring the world to its knees. A few decades later, the stem cell biologist and Harvard prof discovered the modified mRNA technology that led to the creation of Moderna—and, eventually, to the world’s first two approved Covid-19 vaccines. Rossi left Moderna in 2015, but retains a significant amount of stock in the company, now worth $60 billion. And lately, he’s been advising the Canadian government on our future vaccination strategy. Here he tells Toronto Life about how he made his big discovery, and why—gulp—the next pandemic is not a matter of if but when.

You discovered modified mRNA, the scientific innovation behind both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. Maybe we could start with a science-for-dummies explanation of what that is exactly
Sure. Everybody has heard of DNA and we recognize that that’s where our genetic material is, how heredity is passed. What people might not know is that DNA is an incredibly passive molecule; you need active molecules, which are the proteins. People think of proteins as something that comes in their hamburger, but they’re also the worker bees of cells, making sure that cellular life, and therefore all life, happens. MRNA is the middle man, the messenger that carries the genetic coding from the DNA so that cells know what protein to make. That’s not anything we came up with. Scientists have been aware of the mRNA molecule since the 1950s.

So what was your discovery then?
Well, this is where the story gets complicated. Our experiment was actually something different—a project focused on stem cells. As one step in that process, we were trying to figure out if it was possible to inject synthetic mRNA into cells without killing them. After a few false starts, we realized that we could do that by making some modifications, and that’s where the name Moderna comes from—modified mRNA. We completed our work and wrote a paper that was heralded in the scientific community.

And you were named on Time magazine’s list of “People Who Mattered” in 2010.
That’s right! We got quite a bit of attention. But, like I said, the larger project was about stem cells, and everyone wanted to talk about that rather than the modified mRNA. I was getting calls from Big Pharma companies asking me about stem cells, and I’m thinking, Don’t they see what’s really important here? I knew if we could manufacture mRNA, we could make cells produce whatever protein we wanted whenever the heck we wanted. And that meant we could intervene on any aspect of life, including human diseases and illness.

Were vaccines always part of the Moderna game plan?
Not when we started. Generally, vaccines aren’t a very good business model. They tend to have low profit margins, and they aren’t sold for a lot of money, since governments pay for them. Our focus out of the gate at Moderna was on genetic diseases, thousands of which have their underpinnings in a bad stretch of DNA, which makes a bad stretch of mRNA, which makes a bad stretch of proteins. I had always imagined that the first application would be addressing some rare childhood disease, and being able to help a few thousand families. But as you know, and as most of the planet knows, the first two modified mRNA products to receive emergency authorization were these two Covid vaccines—the one by Moderna and the one by Pfizer.

How are mRNA vaccines different from traditional ones?
Let’s start with how all vaccines are the same—they work by getting your immune system ready to mount a response against an invader by introducing that invader into your body in a form that your body will be able to handle. It’s almost like a training session to prepare for the real thing. With traditional vaccines, the invader is expressed by a weakened or inactivated version of the actual virus—in this case SARS-CoV-2—whereas with the mRNA vaccines, we’re injecting the body with modified mRNA that will instruct cells to create that specific protein on the viral surface. For Covid-19, that’s the spike protein we all know from images.

And does that difference make mRNA vaccines better? Faster? Safer?
In traditional vaccines, weakening or deactivating the virus takes time. We can produce synthetic mRNA much faster. Last year, for example, a lot of the world’s vaccine experts were saying there wasn’t a snowball’s chance in hell that we were going to have a vaccine ready to go in 12 months, that it would be more like five years, two years minimum. And that whole time I’m thinking, Well, yeah, but they don’t know the new technology. Think about the traditional approach to the seasonal flu, which has always been to take a best guess at what that year’s strain will be, create a vaccine accordingly and hope for the best. With mRNA, we can wait and create a vaccine based on the strain that emerges.

You will forgive me for noting that you don’t look like a typical science guy. You have a soul patch, you seem to own a lot of rock T-shirts.
It’s funny, because I was doing a webinar with the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine the other week, and they asked me what I would have done if I hadn’t been a scientist. I said I probably would have been a rock and roller. I’m into a lot of obscure punk. I spend a lot of time digging and exploring. I quite like finding new music that I haven’t found before.

Not entirely dissimilar to your work as a scientist.
That’s true. And honestly, I knew what I wanted to do pretty early on. I took a class in molecular biology way back when I was a student at Dr. Norman Bethune High School in Scarborough, and from there I knew what I wanted to do. I have these memories of sitting around with my high school friends doing what it is that high school students do. We’d get into these deep discussion about how the world was going to end. You’d have one guy saying it was going to be an asteroid, another saying nuclear war. I was always the one who said pathogen.

Fast forward to the early weeks of 2020. Are you thinking, Well, this is it. It’s finally arrived?
Ha! Well, I wouldn’t say I saw this as an extinction event, but I was definitely paying attention to the data. Originally we had a fatality rate around two per cent, which was not Ebola level, but pretty goddamn high. I’d left Moderna in 2015 to start other biotech companies, but I still hold a large stock position, so I was hearing from from them that it looked bad. But the flip side was that this is a great application for the mRNA technology, so let’s mobilize. Which of course they did.

What about your own day to day? Were you the guy stocking up on toilet paper? Making work-from-home contingency plans?
I retired from academia a couple of years ago, so I wasn’t having to make major changes. We had planned a family trip to Africa, which we had to cancel. People were saying, “Don’t worry, just go, it’s not a big deal, this virus isn’t even in Africa yet.” But I was like, “It will be.”

And were your kids like, “Come on, Dad—why do you have to be uptight science guy?”
There was a bit of that, but it was clearly the right call. We have a house in New Hampshire that’s in the woods, totally removed, so we went there and we stayed for six months. Either my wife or myself would go to the grocery store once a week, but other than that it was total isolation. My wife is also a biologist, so everything that came into our house was squirted down or rigorously scrubbed. We came back to Boston because my daughters are back in school. And I really did have every intention of retiring two years ago, but since last winter I’ve spent pretty much every day on the phone doing interviews, radio, advocating for science. Obviously that was a major issue in America.

As a Canadian living in what was then Trump’s America, were you paying attention to our Covid response? Did you ever consider heading home?
Of course I was watching. I was pretty proud to see Canada handle it so much better than what was happening here in the U.S., though I guess it’s hard to imagine things being handled worse. I love Canada and I miss it. I haven’t been back to Toronto as much as I used to since my parents passed, and then of course in the last year I haven’t been able to get back. I am a huge Leafs fan, so in the past I’ve been that guy who flies back and forth during playoff season. I’ll be back to cheer for my team when we can do that. In terms of a Covid response, I think Canada has done a good job. Actually, I’ve been advising both the federal and Ontario governments on vaccine strategy.

It’s fair to say our rollout has been slower than we’d like. You’ve got an inside track at Moderna. Where did we go wrong?
Canada did a good job of securing doses. And Canada was able to pay for its Moderna doses upfront, which has been hugely important to getting the infrastructure in place. The current bottleneck is a manufacturing issue, and I don’t know that there’s much that can be done about that. I think the focus needs to be on creating the infrastructure for domestic production. Find a large empty building in Mississauga or Scarborough and get to work on it. It will take a while, and it might even miss most of this pandemic, but guess what?

I don’t like where you’re going here…
There is going to be another pandemic, and next time we can be prepared. Right now, billions of vaccines is a tall order. Imagine if in the future if we had production facilities in countries all over the world and we could do a billion doses in a month?

Can we go back to this next pandemic thing? Do you mean like in our lifetime? In the next 20 years?
I can’t say when exactly, but I’d say the next 20 years is likely. Just look at the recent history of epidemics like SARS, MERS. It’s one of the realities of living in a global society where people fly all over the world. And if you look at what’s happening with variants—that’s probably something we’re going to be dealing with for the next few years.

Moderna is a private company. Has your involvement made you a rich man?
I don’t really like to talk about the money part of it, but yes. I have done well.

Like, “I’m buying a fancy new sports car” well? Or “I’m buying a boat to house my fancy sports car collection” well?
Well, like I said, I don’t want to talk about this. But if you look at the current valuation of the company, it’s somewhere around $60 billion.

Okay, fair enough. Being somewhat removed now, how do you process the part you’ve played in this potentially civilization-saving science?
Are you asking if I pat myself on the shoulder? Listen, even before the pandemic, I was very proud of the success of Moderna. People used to congratulate me and say, “Aren’t you proud? You’ve achieved so much.” I used to say, “Not until we make a product that really changes people’s lives. I’ll be able to hang up my hat when we do that.” But now that that’s happened, I don’t feel like I’m finished. I’m really pleased. There has been so much loss and devastation, and vaccines are the way out of this.

Do your daughters know that Dad is a hero?
Not really. Though my daughter Lumi plays hockey, and the other day one of the hockey moms told me how her daughter was at the dinner table talking to her dad and said, “Why can’t you do something cool like Lumi’s dad?” That was kind of cool.


Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: stargroover ()
Date: February 18, 2021 10:44

Interesting article there SomeTorontoGirl.
I think at some point in the future there will be another pandemic,but that it’s a long long way off.That article is negative speculation.We need and deserve some positivity.
But hey let’s get through this one first!And hope that some of these politicians have learned a few lessons on both preparing for and dealing with the next pandemic.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: bv ()
Date: February 18, 2021 11:08

The mRNA vaccine technology will save many many lives, not just during this pandemic, but also from future virus we still have not seen. The woman behind the mRNA technology worked for ages with little support. Now it is time for her to get the Nobel Price in Medicine.

Katalin Karikó from Hungary now works at BioNTech. Her work, in cooperation with Drew Weissman, is just amazing, a proof of how hard work, patience, and cooperation in international research at is best is working. Thanks to Katalin Karikó Pfizer/BioNTech and ModeRNA have made their highly efficient mRNA vaccines in record time.

The story of mRNA: How a once-dismissed idea became a leading technology in the Covid vaccine race

Bjornulf



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-02-18 11:10 by bv.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: February 18, 2021 11:42

Quote
stargroover
Interesting article there SomeTorontoGirl.
I think at some point in the future there will be another pandemic,but that it’s a long long way off.That article is negative speculation.We need and deserve some positivity.
But hey let’s get through this one first!And hope that some of these politicians have learned a few lessons on both preparing for and dealing with the next pandemic.

Politicians never learn! And the "elite" never cared and never will care about "the common people". Positive feelings and attitude comes from inside yourself. Make sure you never loose that!
And yes, the Nobel Price for Katalin Kariko! (and now, not 20 years in the future, after several more pandemics ...).

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: sarahunwin ()
Date: February 18, 2021 13:08

Quote
bv
About variants and vaccine. The following is based on information as provided by Norwegian health experts (fhi.no).

The variants have been around in UK, South Africa, Ireland, Portugal and other places in Europe for some months now. They make people more aware of keeping a distance, and to mask up. We started getting the UK and SA variants in Norway last month, now it is routine to close down a county whenever these are detected. There was a shift in awareness the moment we were told the variants were here.

The vaccines are not as effective when it comes to the variants, but the vaccines will still work, preventing serious illness. While most vaccines prevent even mild illness, the variants will make you slightly more ill before the variant is detected by the immune system. Then the vaccine will work with the immune system and prevent serious illness most times. This is measured in UK, South Africa and Israel.

We will need new covid-19 vaccine shots every two years or so, not as often as with the annual flu, but more often than once in a lifetime, or once every ten years, which is the case with other vaccines.

The great thing about the mRNA vaccines is the fact that they may be modified within few months, they do not have to go through a year of testing and new approvals.

Warmer weather will make it easier to stay outside, and to be social outside. By summer, more people have vaccine, we may enjoy a beer outside, and after summer, enough people have vaccine, so that the health system will not go into overload whenever some stupid non-vaccinated people choose to party. The virus will probably never go away.

A am not too worries about 2021, we just need to get through the spring. Summer will be great, fall will be even greater. Then The Rolling Stones should be able to tour and release new music in 2022.

Love this post!!

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: bv ()
Date: February 18, 2021 15:38

Nov. 13, 2020 we got drinks ban in my area, closing all sales of alcohol in bars and restaurants. Later on, when the variants from UK and SA appeared in January, shopping centers were closed, and people suddenly started to take all the covid-19 rules and regulations very seriously. There were 100-150 covid-19 positive people in single clusters, like an ice rink in Halden, and a small community in Ulvik. My favorite local restaurant closed Dec 23, the day before Christmas Eve. By then, they had lost money since the alcohol ban. Most of the income in a restaurant is coming from the sales of alcohol. One glass of beer or wine cost US $12, so no wonder this was tough for the business.

Wednesday this week the government announced they had control of the variants, and they left it all up to the local counties to make their own rules. The county I live in - Asker - just outside the capital city Oslo - announced they would allow alcohol sales with food in restaurants as of today Thursday Feb 18. Yesterday at 7pm my local restaurant announced they would open today at noon. I have felt sorry for them for more than three months now. I was there ten past twelve, as their customer number two. Even if it is at freezing point and snowing quite a bit today, I enjoyed sitting outside, with my meal and my drink. When the small brewery car came with fresh beer, soon after I arrived, sure I had to taste it, as all the beer they had back in November had to be thrown away. Beer must be fresh...

Today marks a new phase of the pandemic fight in my area. While Oslo just 20 minutes away do still have a drinks ban, I think we should be able to be open from now on. The local businesses need to stay open. We just have to be smart, keep a distance, do all the stuff we need in order to keep the virus away. I take all my service outside, then I am safe. I will be back to my favorite joint very soon. Finally it feels this pandemic will be over. Not today, but soon, during the spring and early summer.



Bjornulf



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 2021-02-18 15:53 by bv.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: schillid ()
Date: February 18, 2021 15:42

Quote
bv
... Finally it feels this pandemic will be over. Not today, but soon...

From your keyboard to god's computer screen, bv

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Date: February 18, 2021 16:08

Quote
bv

Wednesday this week the government announced they had control of the variants, and they left it all up to the local counties to make their own rules. The county I live in - Asker - just outside the capital city Oslo - announced they would allow alcohol sales with food in restaurants as of today Thursday Feb 18. Yesterday at 7pm my local restaurant announced they would open today at noon.

Today marks a new phase of the pandemic fight in my area. While Oslo just 20 minutes away do still have a drinks ban, I think we should be able to be open from now on. The local businesses need to stay open. We just have to be smart, keep a distance, do all the stuff we need in order to keep the virus away. I take all my service outside, then I am safe. I will be back to my favorite joint very soon. Finally it feels this pandemic will be over. Not today, but soon, during the spring and early summer.

If they open up again it will be a matter of time until shit hits the fan again.
Having said that I truely hope business will be prosperous as usual again.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: bv ()
Date: February 18, 2021 16:21

Quote
TheflyingDutchman
Quote
bv

Wednesday this week the government announced they had control of the variants, and they left it all up to the local counties to make their own rules. The county I live in - Asker - just outside the capital city Oslo - announced they would allow alcohol sales with food in restaurants as of today Thursday Feb 18. Yesterday at 7pm my local restaurant announced they would open today at noon.

Today marks a new phase of the pandemic fight in my area. While Oslo just 20 minutes away do still have a drinks ban, I think we should be able to be open from now on. The local businesses need to stay open. We just have to be smart, keep a distance, do all the stuff we need in order to keep the virus away. I take all my service outside, then I am safe. I will be back to my favorite joint very soon. Finally it feels this pandemic will be over. Not today, but soon, during the spring and early summer.

If they open up again it will be a matter of time until shit hits the fan again.
Having said that I truely hope business will be prosperous as usual again.

Restaurants and bars have been open all over Norway since the first short lockdown March/April last year. They closed the Oslo region, where I live, early November, in order to be on top of the problem, rather than having to run after the cases.

We do now have a stable low number of positive covid-19 cases, and every new local covid-19 cluster is taken care of immediately. The TISK strategy (Test, Isolate, Trace, Quarantine) do work, and as long as they serve alcohol with meals only, I would not be that worried.

Bjornulf

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Date: February 18, 2021 16:29

Quote
bv
Quote
TheflyingDutchman
Quote
bv

Wednesday this week the government announced they had control of the variants, and they left it all up to the local counties to make their own rules. The county I live in - Asker - just outside the capital city Oslo - announced they would allow alcohol sales with food in restaurants as of today Thursday Feb 18. Yesterday at 7pm my local restaurant announced they would open today at noon.

Today marks a new phase of the pandemic fight in my area. While Oslo just 20 minutes away do still have a drinks ban, I think we should be able to be open from now on. The local businesses need to stay open. We just have to be smart, keep a distance, do all the stuff we need in order to keep the virus away. I take all my service outside, then I am safe. I will be back to my favorite joint very soon. Finally it feels this pandemic will be over. Not today, but soon, during the spring and early summer.

If they open up again it will be a matter of time until shit hits the fan again.
Having said that I truely hope business will be prosperous as usual again.

Restaurants and bars have been open all over Norway since the first short lockdown March/April last year. They closed the Oslo region, where I live, early November, in order to be on top of the problem, rather than having to run after the cases.

We do now have a stable low number of positive covid-19 cases, and every new local covid-19 cluster is taken care of immediately. The TISK strategy (Test, Isolate, Trace, Quarantine) do work, and as long as they serve alcohol with meals only, I would not be that worried.

Big difference with Norway is that Holland is a populous country. That works against us as far as covid is concerned



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-02-18 16:32 by TheflyingDutchman.

Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: February 18, 2021 17:01

Quote
bv
The mRNA vaccine technology will save many many lives, not just during this pandemic, but also from future virus we still have not seen. The woman behind the mRNA technology worked for ages with little support. Now it is time for her to get the Nobel Price in Medicine.

Katalin Karikó from Hungary now works at BioNTech. Her work, in cooperation with Drew Weissman, is just amazing, a proof of how hard work, patience, and cooperation in international research at is best is working. Thanks to Katalin Karikó Pfizer/BioNTech and ModeRNA have made their highly efficient mRNA vaccines in record time.

The story of mRNA: How a once-dismissed idea became a leading technology in the Covid vaccine race

Thanks for sharing, Bjornulf. It’s nice that some of the people behind this important work are recognized and, yes, Nobel prizes should follow. I would rather read about them than another Khardasian.


Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 status around the world
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: February 18, 2021 18:32

Major storms wreaking havoc in the US in more ways than one....

Via CNN:

After the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that severe weather around the US will delay Covid-19 vaccine deliveries in the coming days,
infectious disease expert Michael Osterholm says this will not slow down production, it will just delay when the shots get into people’s arms. Instead, the big concern
is the availability of enough doses and how many people can be vaccinated before the anticipated surge in Covid-19 cases due to the UK variant.

“This very likely, in the next five to 14 weeks, is going to cause a major surge of cases in this country. And our own work has shown that … over 30 million Americans
over the age of 65 will not have access to vaccine in these next 12 to 14 weeks. That's a real challenge,” Osterholm said.

> Vaccine delays

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

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