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Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: February 7, 2020 22:37


Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Rocky Dijon ()
Date: February 7, 2020 22:43

Boy are they misidentified in that photo.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Date: February 7, 2020 22:49

Quote
Rocky Dijon
Boy are they misidentified in that photo.
At least they got Mick right. lol

On the 7th day God created The Rolling Stones

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: artedm ()
Date: February 26, 2020 20:08

Got to see the movie last night 2/25 at a private screening in Denver, Colorado
opens NY/LA March 6

I'm not a film critic here is the teaser from online-
The art world and the underworld collide in director Giuseppe Capotondi's elegant and erotic neo-noir thriller, The Burnt Orange Heresy. Set in present day Italy, irresistibly charismatic art critic James Figueras hooks up with provocative and alluring fellow American, Berenice Hollis. He's a classic anti-hero in the making with a charm that masks his deep ambition, whilst she's an innocent touring Europe, enjoying the freedom of being whoever she wishes. The new lovers travel to the lavish and opulent Lake Como estate of powerful art collector, Cassidy. Their host reveals he is the patron of Jerome Debney, the reclusive J.D. Salinger of the art world, and he has a simple request: for James to steal a Debney masterpiece from the artist's studio, whatever the cost. As the couple spend time with the legendary Debney, they start to realize that nothing about artist nor their mission is what it seems. But James is a man of deep, lurking ambition and he will do anything, from arson and burglary to murder, in order to further his career...

Rating: R (for some sexual content/nudity, language, drug use and violence)
Genre: Action & Adventure, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Directed By: Giuseppe Capotondi
Written By: Scott B. Smith
In Theaters: Mar 6, 2020 limited
Runtime: 98 minutes
Studio: Sony Pictures Classics

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: drewmaster ()
Date: February 29, 2020 04:13

From an interesting review in the New Yorker [www.newyorker.com]

Cassidy is played by none other than Mick Jagger, who has graced our feature films all too rarely since he played the reclusive rock star of “Performance” (1970), delivering “Memo from Turner” in a crowing drawl, among half-naked gangsters, with Ry Cooder on slide guitar. If Jagger’s character hadn’t been shot at the end of that movie, you could imagine him growing up into the comically rich Maecenas of “The Burnt Orange Heresy”—though not, as yet, growing old. Cassidy is an extraordinary figure: wicked, wrinkled, flute-thin, flawlessly dressed, with a head too big for his frame and a smile too big for his head. The smile suggests a perpetual amusement, as if he were enjoying a joke that is far too private to share.

Drew

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Rocky Dijon ()
Date: February 29, 2020 05:35

As perfect a description of the latter-day Jagger as one could hope to find.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: drewmaster ()
Date: March 1, 2020 00:17

More insight into the film (and Mick's lifestyle) at [hudsonvalleyone.com]

“Before we started shooting Mick said to me, ‘Bill, I haven’t been awake before noon in 50 years.’ So we negotiated and struck a deal that he’d be on set at 10 a.m. each morning we were shooting,” Horberg said. “And sure enough, at 9:55 a.m. each morning he’d be on a boat crossing Lake Como, arriving at 9:59 exactly. It was great working with him.”

Drew

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: March 3, 2020 15:10

Rolling back: Why we should welcome Mick Jagger's big screen return

[www.theguardian.com]

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: March 3, 2020 15:27

Great article Beast - thanks for that. I never knew Mick auditioned for the Rocky Horror Picture Show (can’t imagine him as FNF...). Liked him a lot in Burnt Orange Heresy and am looking forward to other’s reviews when it opens.


Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Glam Descendant ()
Date: March 4, 2020 01:46

That song he sings in BENT ("Streets of Berlin ", composed by Philip Glass!) has yet to see an official CD release.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2020-03-04 04:50 by Glam Descendant.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: wickerman ()
Date: March 5, 2020 00:52

Is there going to be an official premiere of this movie anywhere?

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: March 5, 2020 01:02

Quote
wickerman
Is there going to be an official premiere of this movie anywhere?

I’m not sure if this counts as the Premiere, but it screened at the Cannes Film Festival and Toronto Film Festival in September.


Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: March 5, 2020 01:08

Quote
SomeTorontoGirl
Great article Beast - thanks for that. I never knew Mick auditioned for the Rocky Horror Picture Show (can’t imagine him as FNF...). Liked him a lot in Burnt Orange Heresy and am looking forward to other’s reviews when it opens.

Pleased to hear that Mick’s performance in the film passed muster with you! Am looking forward to seeing it whenever it’s released in the UK.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Glam Descendant ()
Date: March 5, 2020 03:27

Another article states the Rocky Horror claim is false.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 5, 2020 17:25

Returning to acting, Jagger plays a man of wealth and taste

By JAKE COYLE March, 4 2020


Jose Haro/Sony Pictures Classics

[apnews.com]

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: drewmaster ()
Date: March 5, 2020 18:56

What a GREAT pic! Thanks, bye bye johnny.

Drew

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: March 5, 2020 20:20

Another review from the Washington Post.

[www.washingtonpost.com]

Mick Jagger is a movie star again, and it’s about time

By Ann Hornaday, Movie critic
March 5, 2020 at 8:00 a.m. EST

A funny thing happens when you interview Mick Jagger. He’ll be talking about all manner of subjects — the vagaries of art collecting, the similarities between live performance and screen acting, the ambiguities embedded in the latest film he’s in — and he could be any cultured, well-educated 76-year-old Brit who knows his way around the world. Then, he’ll say something — something brief, inconsequential, off-handed — that reminds you that the man on the other end of the line is Mick Freakin’ Jagger.

That moment occurred during a brief conversation last week, when Jagger phoned from Paris to talk about the role he plays in “The Burnt Orange Heresy,” a twisty little thriller — part Hitchcock, part Highsmith — set amid the art world at its most scheming and hyper-commodified. Jagger plays Joseph Cassidy, a collector living in palatial isolation on the shores of Lake Como, who invites a cynical art critic (Claes Bang) to visit for a weekend; Cassidy, it turns out, harbors a hidden agenda, which becomes all the more treacherous when it affects the young woman — played by Elizabeth Debicki — who comes along as the writer’s last-minute date. The plot thickens when Donald Sutherland shows up as a famous, and famously reclusive, painter.

Like most of the dramatis personae in “The Burnt Orange Heresy,” which opens in Washington on March 13, Cassidy is prone to deception, dissembling and perhaps something even more dangerous. Jagger leans into his part with the relaxed, playful relish that suggests a man having the time of his life.

“One of my character’s roles is to kick off the action,” Jagger explains, noting that until he shows up, the audience might think they’re in for a steamy romance set against a fabulously romantic backdrop. “I was very aware that I had to do that properly, to put the game in play,” he says. “Up to that point, you’re following these two people having an affair, you know, and you’re thinking ‘That’s kind of hot.’ They’re kind of hot, and they’re having this wild affair in Europe, you know, and then what? You don’t know what they’re doing, really. They’re not doing anything. They just seem to be hanging out in Italy. And then [Cassidy] puts them into the narrative, which carries on for the rest of the film and makes her life rather difficult.”

It’s those kind-of-hots, uttered in Jagger’s distinctive, Cockney-adjacent cadence, that make one snap to and remember that, oh yeah, the actor on the line promoting his latest project also happens to be one of rock-and-roll’s most enduring and iconic figures. And, in a way, it’s precisely because Jagger is such a legendary frontman that he was a natural choice for a part meant to, ahem, start it up.

The kind of projection and outsize physicality it takes to be a rock star might seem to be diametrically opposed to the kind of restraint and transparency that define a great screen performance. But Jagger sees more similarities than differences.

If the part requires it, which they quite often do, you have to exude a certain amount of energy and life,” he explains. “If you’re watching a movie and in the scene one of the actors seems a bit dead … the scene becomes a bit lifeless. So without overdoing it, you’ve got to be vital, so to speak, on the screen to make the scene keep the audience’s attention.”

It’s been almost 20 years since Jagger had a major role in a movie (“Ages,” he says). Giuseppe Capotondi, who directed “The Burnt Orange Heresy,” says he hadn’t considered Jagger for the role of Cassidy until he got word that the musician was interested in doing a film. Capotondi sent Jagger the script, “and obviously he must have liked it, because he said, ‘Come and meet me.’ We went to see him in his office and he said yes. It was very straightforward.”

For Jagger, “The Burnt Orange Heresy” is less a comeback than the result of a number of salutary forces aligning, including being offered a script to read in the first place. “To be honest, there are so many actors out there who are very good, and they’re all hustling like crazy,” he explains. “And I’m kind of really not, because I’ve got, like, other interests.” (Those interests include a band called the Rolling Stones; Jagger filmed “The Burnt Orange Heresy” a few months after wrapping up the European leg of the No Filter tour in 2018.)

He adds that even though he has only a small amount of screen time, “It wasn’t just a walk-on [where they] use your name. It was enough to be able to make a character out of, I thought. And to be able to create something.”

Jagger even went so far as to suggest that Cassidy speak in a Chelsea accent from when it was scruffily bohemian rather than posh. “He’s an actor at the end of the day. He’s not just a singer trying his skills at acting,” Capotondi says, adding that Jagger reminded him of the great stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age, the ones “who sort of glided into a room rather than walked.” his first take was his best; he didn’t improve with repetition. Jagger, Capotondi insists, was the opposite. “He’s not ‘Mick Jagger’ when he’s on set,” the filmmaker says. “He’s very professional. He wants to do more and more and more. The poor guy, he had dialogues [that were] 10 pages long. It wasn’t the easiest part for any actor.”

The role of Cassidy is one of just a handful of movie roles Jagger has done since 1970, when he made his feature debut in the Australian outlaw drama “Ned Kelly” and “Performance,” in which he played a darker, more louche version of himself. If there are comparisons to be made between the latter film and “The Burnt Orange Heresy” — both of which traffic in themes of art, fraudulence, reclusiveness and doppelgängers — Jagger is chary of seeing too tidy a fit. “I suppose I’ve done so few films you’ve got very little to reference!” he says with a laugh. Although he has his share of forgettables on his résumé (R.I.P. “Freejack”), his turn as a bespoke pimp in 2002’s “The Man From Elysian Fields” evinced sly Mephistophelean craftiness; the outtakes from his scuppered turn opposite Jason Robards in Werner Herzog’s “Fitzcarraldo” leave tantalizing clues as to what might have been.

Jagger admits wishing he could have done more. “It’s hard to remember what it was like in the old days, because there was so much prejudice against people who were from, say, the rock world — people who did casting wouldn’t even consider that you could do that,” he recalls. “As far as Hollywood was concerned, it was a bit of a no-no.”

And of course, he had to battle a formidable competitor that has dogged him throughout his movie career, the character he spent years creating and refining that we now know as the Dionysian, alluringly androgynous, sexily strutting persona Mick Jagger. He concedes that his larger-than-life stage presence has sometimes proved an obstacle. “You have to overcome that and make people believe you’re not that character,” he says. “But that’s acting.”

Jagger is pleased that the character of Cassidy in “The Burnt Orange Heresy” doesn’t resemble off-screen Mick Jagger in the slightest (he doesn’t collect art, which is “rather disappointing,” he says. “I could have had a wonderful art collection for relatively little investment, back in the day”). In fact, he observes, the role of Cassidy was originally written for a woman. “I think it was going to be played by Judi Dench,” he says, and suddenly he’s sent into a fit of giggles at the mental image he just conjured. “Maybe she’ll get one of my parts,” Jagger says, still laughing. “Who knows? Who knows?”

Whatever the answer, you’ve got to admit: It’s kind of hot.


Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: March 5, 2020 22:39

...and another from the New Yorker... bits relevant to BOH reproduced below.

[www.newyorker.com]

In both films, what appears to be consensual intimacy is an act of deliberate carnal deceit.
By Anthony Lane
February 28, 2020

Elizabeth Debicki and Claes Bang star in Giuseppe Capotondi’s film.Illustration by Leonardo Santamaria.

Career options are in constant flux. Ambitious students who might once have embarked upon an arduous training in neurosurgery can now stream the sound of panpipes, invest in a clutch of jade eggs, and swiftly prosper as wellness consultants. No profession has risen quite so fast, however, as that of intimacy coördinator. It’s a hell of a job. You hang around on movie sets, telling people in various states of undress what they can do to one another, what they mustn’t even think of when they’re doing it, what they definitely can’t do, and, once they’ve not done it, how to treat the nasty case of tennis elbow that they developed along the way.

Yet the hardiest intimacy coördinator—armed with a tape measure, a protractor, a magnifying glass, and a copy of Peter Singer’s “Practical Ethics”—would struggle, I suspect, with “The Burnt Orange Heresy” and “The Whistlers.” These two new films have a surprising amount in common. In each case, near the start, a man and a woman have sex. The activity itself is vanilla but vigorous, like a frothing milkshake. But what of the motivations?

In “The Burnt Orange Heresy,” the spent participants, who only just met, lounge around, in ecstasy’s wake, and riff about what comes next. “We’ll move to the States. Connecticut, probably. Buy a house, porch, with a swing and a brook,” one says. “Babbling,” the other adds. You can sense that the riffing turns them on, and that they’re almost certainly lying about what brought them to this encounter. As for “The Whistlers,” the couple isn’t a couple. He’s a cop and she’s a criminal, but they’re in league, and she pretends to be a sex worker, summoned to his apartment, because they’re all too aware of being watched on CCTV by those who wish them ill. In short, what appears to be consensual intimacy, in both movies, is an act of deliberate carnal deceit. Coördinate that.

“The Burnt Orange Heresy,” directed by Giuseppe Capotondi, stars Claes Bang (I’m saying nothing) as an art critic named James Figueras. Though handsomely clean-cut, he’s ragged around the edges in ways that are hard to define; you’d willingly lend him money, but you wouldn’t expect to get it back. We first meet him in Milan, where he’s lecturing to a group of culture buffs—spinning them a yarn about a nonexistent painter and then smoothly reeling them in. They are joined by a latecomer, the elegant Berenice Hollis (Elizabeth Debicki), of no fixed abode. She and Figueras, wasting no time, become firm friends, as detailed above, and he asks her along on his next jaunt: an invitation from a wealthy art collector, Joseph Cassidy, to his villa on Lake Como. Tough gig.

Cassidy is played by none other than Mick Jagger, who has graced our feature films all too rarely since he played the reclusive rock star of “Performance” (1970), delivering “Memo from Turner” in a crowing drawl, among half-naked gangsters, with Ry Cooder on slide guitar. If Jagger’s character hadn’t been shot at the end of that movie, you could imagine him growing up into the comically rich Maecenas of “The Burnt Orange Heresy”—though not, as yet, growing old. Cassidy is an extraordinary figure: wicked, wrinkled, flute-thin, flawlessly dressed, with a head too big for his frame and a smile too big for his head. The smile suggests a perpetual amusement, as if he were enjoying a joke that is far too private to share.

Identifying Figueras as a fellow-knave, Cassidy gives him a delicate sin to commit. The target is Jerome Debney (Donald Sutherland), the Salinger of painters—an object of both reverence and rumor, long vanished from the public eye. In fact, he’s dwelling quietly in the grounds of the villa, and Figueras’s mission, should he choose to accept it, is to steal a Debney, having inveigled himself into the artist’s confidence. What (or, indeed, whether) he has been creating of late is not the point. Cassidy, like all patrons, craves to possess.

“The Burnt Orange Heresy” began as a 1971 novel by Charles Willeford: cavalryman, tank commander, poet, boxer, crime writer, and college professor. No bio-pic could contain so thronged a life. “Miami Blues,” published in 1984, four years before his death, was adapted into a sharp-witted thriller, with Alec Baldwin and Jennifer Jason Leigh, and I was praying for a repeat with “The Burnt Orange Heresy.” Everything’s in place, and there’s not a weak link in the cast, with Debicki—lofty, playful, and unreadable—in especially beguiling form. The idea that art, like love, is something that you can make or fake, and that surprisingly few people can tell the difference, will always be ripe for exploration. And yet the movie stumbles. The book was set in Florida, and the prettifying switch to Italy adds languor but subtracts fever; even when the plot speeds up, in the final third, the atmosphere feels more hasty than intense, and the alluring promise of the early scenes, when you couldn’t tell if the hero was fooling the heroine, or vice versa, melts away. They should have stayed in bed.


Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Chris Fountain ()
Date: March 5, 2020 23:46

How does Rotten Tomatoes rate it? - we'll see - Jagger would have mad an interesting Joker.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: GS1978 ()
Date: March 6, 2020 13:19

Mick gets great review from the New York Times:

NY Times review

"There’s some grim stuff here, but very little of Willeford’s mordant humor. A small and potent quantity of this quality is delivered by the larger-than-life rock star Mick Jagger in the role of Cassidy. Jagger shows a refreshing lack of conventional vanity by allowing both Bang and Debicki to tower over him. Possibly because he, and his character, have the upper hand anyway. His character is a nonchalant Lucifer and, as it happens, the strongest reason to see this movie."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2020-03-06 13:24 by GS1978.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: TheGreek ()
Date: March 6, 2020 14:37

I just read a really great write up/review in the NY Post , that heaped good praise on Mick's acting and the movie actually looks interesting with a good plot as Mick plays a art dealer . I want to see this movie and I checked the local listings and it is not being shown in my neck of the woods at this time .

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: TheGreek ()
Date: March 6, 2020 19:15

This is the kind of thing that makes my head snap around in full circle and it Starts me up as much as the cliché that it sounds like .

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 6, 2020 19:19

'The Burnt Orange Heresy’ Review: Art-Critic Caper Can’t Cut the Mustard

Not even Mick Jagger can lift up this slowburn thriller about a rich collector, a reclusive painter and a rare work of art

By Peter Travers


Claes Bang, Elizabeth Debicki and Mick Jagger in 'The Burnt Orange Heresy.' - Jose Haro/Sony Picture Classics

[www.rollingstone.com]

:Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: TheGreek ()
Date: March 6, 2020 21:45

This is in theaters on March 13th. I guess I will be going to see this if it doesn't get shelved like No Time To Die is confused smiley

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 6, 2020 22:04

Mick Jagger finds he can get some satisfaction - from acting

Jill Serjeant
March 6, 2020

(Reuters) - No matter if he is rocking out before an arena packed with tens of thousands of fans or acting in an indie film, Mick Jagger says the experience is essentially the same: He’s still performing.

Jagger’s latest acting gig, in the independent thriller “The Burnt Orange Heresy,” finds the 76 year-old musician playing a wealthy art collector Joseph Cassidy, who asks an art critic to steal a painting from a reclusive artist.

The movie, also starring Donald Sutherland and set in a villa on Lake Como, opens in New York and Los Angeles on Friday.

At just two scenes, it’s Jagger’s biggest movie role since 2001, when he played an elegant Brit running a high-class escort service in “Elysian Fields.”

From uncredited “soldier in a bar” to starring as Australian outlaw Ned Kelly in 1970, Jagger says acting is one of his many interests outside rock and roll.

“Acting is not a huge part of my life, but when I get to do it, I always enjoy it,” Jagger told Reuters.

“It’s another kind of performing. I’m up for doing things that interest me, whether it’s acting, music, comedy, whatever,” he said

With swept back hair and elegant suits, Jagger is barely recognizable in “The Burnt Orange Heresy” as the dancing, jeans-clad frontman of the Rolling Stones.

“I only have two scenes, and you’ve really got to make the most of it. I didn’t think it was too much of a stretch for me,” said Jagger.

“I thought it was a character I could bring something to... I thought, I have seen people like this. I think I could be this manipulative person and make this work,” he said.

Since 1970, when Jagger had starring roles in “Performance” and “Ned Kelly,” most of his roles have been supporting parts in indie movies or uncredited roles.

“I wish I’d done a bit more, and I wish I’d got better roles. (But) I’m a working musician. I’m not out there hustling acting parts much,” he said.

Jagger said that when he was in his 20s and early 30s, it was harder for musicians to make the transition to acting.

“People didn’t want to take you seriously. They thought you would be flaky, that you wouldn’t turn out, or you wouldn’t be doing the craft right, and why take a chance. Now it’s a lot easier for people to do both.”

Jagger said he has had no long-term effects from the heart valve replacement surgery he underwent in April 2019. He was back on stage two months later, and the Stones go back on the road in the United States in May.

Fans will have to wait longer for the band’s much talked-about first album of new music since 2005.

“Don’t hold your breath!” Jagger said. “I’ve been writing a lot, and I’ve done a load of demos and the Stones have recorded some really nice things. But we haven’t finished the album yet, so I’ve got no date for that.”

[www.reuters.com]

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: Ruediger ()
Date: March 10, 2020 20:42

I haven't read the complete thread - sorry for that.

But I have found that the book is being offered by Amazon for a reasonable price as paperback, expensive as hardcover and quite cheap as Kindle-version:

The Burnt Orange Heresy (Murder Room) (English Edition)
von Charles Willeford
Kindle: 3,99€
Gebundenes Buch (hardcover): 177,26 €
Taschenbuch (paperback): 8,85€

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: March 10, 2020 20:50

Am amazed that in the film's publicity Mick is almost given equal top billing. From what I am aware his is almost a cameo role.
Still, if his name raises the film's profile, so much the better.
Hope to see him getting more film roles and more projects from Jagged Films which has been pretty quiet of late.

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: drewmaster ()
Date: March 16, 2020 14:38

Looks like this film will be another victim of the coronavirus. It was supposed to open this Friday in Philly and I was really looking forward to seeing it.

Oh well.

Drew

Re: Mick Jagger Joins Heist Thriller ‘Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: drewmaster ()
Date: July 10, 2020 01:42

For anyone who still cares -

The Sony website now says Aug 7 will be when Burnt Orange Heresy "returns to theaters".

[www.sonyclassics.com]

Drew

Mick Jagger in 'The Burnt Orange Heresy’
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: August 10, 2020 00:11

Mick's interview with Mark Olsen of The Los Angeles Times, published August 7:

Mick Jagger on Rolling Stones return, 'Burnt Orange Heresy'


Donald Sutherland, Mick Jagger, Elizabeth Debicki and Claes Bang costar in “The Burnt Orange Heresy.” (Jose Haro / Sony Pictures Classics)

[www.latimes.com]

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