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Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Mathijs ()
Date: March 22, 2019 18:00

Quote
exilestones
Quote
Kennedy
Great article. Glad it didn't pan out. Instead, we got one of the most definitive Stones documents ever from Hampton Roads.

Yeah, it was a good read. The New York City club show was news to me.

From different articles I read, it seems like Hampton wasn't on the original schedule and added later.

According to Wyman the Hampton PPV was solely a Mick affair, and the band apparently didn't know about it until they arrived at the venue.

Mathijs

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Date: March 22, 2019 19:56

Quote
Mathijs
Quote
exilestones
Quote
Kennedy
Great article. Glad it didn't pan out. Instead, we got one of the most definitive Stones documents ever from Hampton Roads.

Yeah, it was a good read. The New York City club show was news to me.

From different articles I read, it seems like Hampton wasn't on the original schedule and added later.

According to Wyman the Hampton PPV was solely a Mick affair, and the band apparently didn't know about it until they arrived at the venue.

Mathijs
Maybe it was the other way around in reality: everyone but Wyman knew about it winking smiley

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: sundevil ()
Date: March 22, 2019 23:58

i'm wondering if there is conflation between two stories here. the '78 tour movie was suppose to be a closed circuit broadcast in U.S. theaters. but the stones (mick?) thought the film made them look old. the '81 PPV was over a fairly new pay cable channel (On TV?). bill graham told them of the offer and mick said "yeah, okay sure, i guess". that was about all of the thought process that went into it. i think the offer came in december. then backstage during the opening set woody said "why do i feel like millions of people are watching?"

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: swimtothemoon ()
Date: March 23, 2019 00:31

The pay per view for the Hampton show was announced weeks in advance in order
to secure subscribers. I think at that point this date - the 18th - was the last scheduled show of the tour. Then at some point the show on the 19th was added - which was the actual last show of the 1981 tour.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 23, 2019 03:21

My question is, when was Hampton added to the tour? The many news articles and t-shirts from the tour don't have Hampton listed.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-23 12:39 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 24, 2019 02:38

Three DC Shows to End Stones Tour




Stones Concerts Sold Out
WASHINGTON POST

By Jan Benzel November 23, 1981



The announcement came over the radio in the middle of the night that tickets would go on sale that same night for the long-anticipated Washington, D.C., Rolling Stones concerts. Everyone knew the Stones were coming to the Capital Centre, but just didn't know when the coveted tickets would be available.

The Rolling Stones will have three shows in Washington: Dec. 7, 8 and 9. The news came over the radio to rock 'n' roll fans winding up a Saturday night of partying, driving their dates home from the movies, getting off their shifts at fast-food restaurants or just drifting off to sleep.

By 2 a.m., when the tickets actually went on sale, the vast parking lot at the Capital Centre was host to a bevy of cars emptying frenzied fans, clutching sweaters or draped in blankets, into the cold, windy dark.


Officials said 2,000 people were waiting for tickets when the ticket windows opened. Some had arrived as early as Friday, after hearing rumors that the tickets would go on sale sometime over the weekend. By 4 a.m. yesterday the crowd was estimated at 4,000. And within 12 hours, the three shows (with nearly 20,000 seats apiece) were sold out.

The Washington dates complete the Stones' first tour of the United States in three years. The tour began on Sept. 25 in Philadelphia, where the 90,000 seats available for two shows at JFK Stadium were sold out in less than 24 hours.

In the light of the huge Capital Centre arena, the crowd mobbed the ticket portals. But the fans (many of whom must have been very young when Mick Jagger started singing "Jumpin' Jack Flash") quickly overcame the initial confusion over which line was for tickets and which for the necessary green voucher with your number on it. Getting tickets to see the Rolling Stones was turning out to be an experience rather like going to the bakery. When you got your number (meaning you could buy four tickets at $17.50 a shot if you could find $70 at 2 o'clock in the morning) you also mysteriously had your hand stamped "CONFIDENTIAL."


At the Cap Centre officials' insistence the fans formed an unusually orderly single line and waited patiently for their numbers. Well, most were patient.

"Hey," said one blond teen-age girl through chattering teeth (she had just finished work at the Red Lobster and hadn't had time to change out of her uniform or grab a coat). "Do you know someone here in line?" This to a guy who was trying to casually work his way into a better line position.

Those already in line around the pair looked accusingly at the usurper.

"But I was here before," he protested faintly, then moved sheepishly off to the end of the line coiling around beneath the red, white and blue Liberty Bell gate marker.

"Anyone want to buy a voucher?" called out one youth. "Guaranteed you get tickets. Just five bucks." He, too, was shunned. The teen-agers appeared disgusted with someone who would disturb their order of civilization.


After the line for the vouchers came the vigil for tickets, with the cold, sleepy crowd huddling together for warmth.

"Hey man, I'll give you two tickets for that hat if you give me your voucher, too," offered a curly-haired youth.

"Tickets? You have tickets already?"

"Yeah, my old man knew somebody at the Capital Centre."

Offer considered, reluctantly refused. There was sentimental attachment to the hat.

"Wait a minute. If you've got tickets, why are you standing here?"

"Oh, I'm just hanging out," he replied offhandedly.

Another boy, tall with freckles and glasses, grinned. "I just saw Woodstock on HBO, man," he said. "This is like that -- all those people coming together . . . "

"How old were you when Woodstock happened?" asked a cynical observer.

"Nine."

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 24, 2019 15:39

Quote
exilestones
Three DC Shows to End Stones Tour


Stones Concerts Sold Out
WASHINGTON POST
By Jan Benzel November 23, 1981


"The Washington dates complete the Stones' first tour of the United States in three years. The tour began on Sept. 25 in Philadelphia, where the 90,000 seats available for two shows at JFK Stadium were sold out in less than 24 hours."



The above article from the Washington Post, a well respected newspaper, wrote about the Rolling Stones Washington DC shows completing the Stones 1981 USA tour. I have no doubt the Post gave accurate information in this article published on November 23, 1981 was accurate. The Hampton shows apparently weren't announced yet.






Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-07 22:32 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 24, 2019 19:45

WASHINGTON DC




           Photos by the Rolling Stones 1981 tour photographer, 
           Michael Halsband



Keith and Bobby Womack belt out a song before a show in DC.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 25, 2019 03:22

WASHINGTON DC











photos are by a special contribution by House Boy Knows!

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 25, 2019 03:37


WASHINGTON DC


Capitol Center Maryland - 7 December 1981 - photo by House Boy Knows




Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-27 00:56 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 25, 2019 12:28

WASHINGTON DC







photos by House Boy Knows






Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-27 01:02 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 25, 2019 19:33

STONES VISIT ATLANTA - TOUR MAY END IN HOUSTON



THE POP LIFE; THE STONES ROLL ON, REFUSING TO BECOME SHOW-BUSINESS SLICK
By ROBERT PALMERNOV. 4, 1981
New York Times


THE Rolling Stones visited Atlanta for about five hours last week - just enough time to land their chartered jet, race into town to the Fox Theater, play a two-hour set, race back to the airport and take off for Houston, the next stop on their 1981 American tour. The tour is expected to be the most profitable in the history of rock-and roll; its sheer size has been staggering. It began with the group's having to add a second show in Philadelphia's immense John F. Kennedy Stadium, which seats about 92,000, and will probably end with two shows at the New Orleans Superdome. The band's five shows in the New York area, which begin tomorrow night at the Brendan T. Byrne Sports Arena in New Jersey's Meadowlands, will accommodate a total of nearly 150,000. That looks like an impressive figure, but ticket requests for these shows ran into the millions.

Suddenly, everyone wants to see the Rolling Stones - their older fans are in their 30's and 40's, like the Stones themselves; their youngest fans are barely into their teens. ''The crowds were young, real young in Florida,'' Mick Jagger noted with evident relish as a makeup man applied pancake makeup to his face, a few minutes before the group was scheduled to go onstage in Atlanta. ''The front rows in Orlando were filled with these 12- or 13-year-old girls, some of whom were making the most unseemly suggestions.''

Fearful Parents of 60's

This is exactly what parents were afraid of back in the mid-60's, when a British newspaper asked, ''Would you let your daughter go out with a Rolling Stone?'' and magazines for teen-agers that ran features on the group regularly received answering letters from parents calling the Stones ''anti-Christs corrupting our children'' and that sort of thing. But this is 1981. The Stones have been rolling for nearly 20 years now, and although they have suffered some wear and tear, they have survived and prospered while their only real peers either splintered like the Beatles or burned out and found religion, like the born-again Bob Dylan. One reason they have pulled through is that they do not take themselves very seriously. ''You never know what to believe,' was Mick Jagger's response to a comment on the avalanche of ticket requests for the band's shows at Madison Square Garden and Byrne Arena. ''It may be three grandmothers in Queens sending in tons of ticket requests, for all I know.''

But of course the Rolling Stones' American following is much larger than ''three grandmothers in Queens.'' And what do they see, those who are lucky enough to get tickets to a Stones show? In Philadelphia, at the beginning of the tour, they saw a band that was rusty enough to make mistakes, like starting a song in two different keys and crashing to a halt, and loose enough to smile, make a joke and carry on. The Stones are much tighter now, in the second month of their tour, but they are still making mistakes.

These days, one rarely encounters a rock band that makes mistakes, unless the band is playing in a bar or a punk-rock club. Bands that sell millions of records and routinely perform in stadiums and arenas have honed their stage routines to slick, machinelike precision. Being this predictable is, of course, good business. It is a byproduct of big-time rock having moved out of the concert halls and theaters and into the sports arenas, where bands cannot afford to give too many poor performances. But to some rock-and-roll fans, usually the older, purist sort, rock-and-roll shows should include mistakes. Without mistakes, there are no surprises, and without surprises, this line of reasoning concludes, there is no rock-androll. There is something inferior - show business, mere entertainment.


''No, we're not slick,'' Mick Jagger said in Atlanta. ''We're still trying to be; making mistakes is embarrassing. But as far as us actually getting as slick as most of the bands playing today, I doubt we ever will. We've been trying for 20 years, and we haven't managed it yet.''

The opening shows of the Rolling Stones tour may have been raw, but they were not raw enough for some people. After the first show in Philadelphia, several of the band's employees, veterans of a number of Rolling Stones tours, gathered in a hotel bar to air their grievances. ''What're the boys up to?'' one wanted to know; after two decades, the five Rolling Stones are still ''the boys'' to their friends and co-workers. ''Asleep,'' said another fellow, contemptuously. ''Ah, it isn't like it used to be. Where's the madness, the insanity?'' The Unspoken Law

It is an unspoken but rarely questioned Rock and Roll Law that big-time rock tours are supposed to breed madness. Rolling Stones tours certainly do. Everybody who has been on one has a favorite madness story; this writer recalls an evening during the 1975 tour when the group checked into the Memphis Hilton at around 2 A.M. and were asked for a deposit on the dozens of rooms they had reserved by a panicky night manager. Peter Rudge, who was the tour's manic commander in chief, turned red and began screaming: ''So you want a deposit, eh? I'll show you a bloody deposit!'' He dashed outside to his limousine and returned a few moments later with a hefty leather briefcase, which he proceeded to open upside down over the hotel's front desk. The bag was full of money. Greenbacks filled the air, like a green tickertape parade, and drifted gently to the Astroturf carpet.''There,'' said Mr. Rudge, pleased with himself. ''There's your bloody deposit.''

That night, Keith Richards kept a number of the hotel's guests awake by playing his electric guitar into the early morning. Then he decided that rather than fly to Texas after the show on the band's rented jet, he would drive. He enlisted the Stones' other guitarist, Ron Wood, in this risky enterprise. Later that day, they were arrested in Fordyce, Ark., after a policeman saw their car fishtail uncertainly. They were put in the Fordyce jail, which was surrounded by teenagers as soon as the news leaked out. Lawyers began calling Fordyce from as far away as London, threatening dire consequences should Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood not be in Texas that night for the Rolling Stones' arena concert. An agreement was reached, a private plane was sent in and Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood made it to the show in Texas with minutes to spare. Now that was madness!

If the 1981 tour has been different, it is largely because Keith Richards is a different man. Once the most flagrant alcohol- and drug-abuser in the group, he has straightened up dramatically. He looks healthy, he is playing brilliantly and his backup vocals are often so lusty that they drown out Mr. Jagger, who is working harder to hold up his end of things as result. But when this writer arrived backstage at the Fox Theater in Atlanta, Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood seemed to be up to their old tricks. It was almost 9 P.M. and the opening act, England's Stray Cats, had almost finished their set, but Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood had not yet arrived at the theater. Mr. Jagger did not even know if they had arrived in Atlanta.

Jerri Hall, the model and actress who has been Mr. Jagger's steady girlfriend for several years now, burst into the dressing room, laughing. ''Keith and Ronnie just got here,'' she reported, ''and do you know what Ronnie did? He came trudging into the theater, carrying his bags, with his head down, eyes on the ground, and he trudged right out onto the stage! The Stray Cats were on. He looked up, noticed that there was a lot of light and a band playing, turned around, and trudged backstage again.'' She collapsed in giggles. ''Now that's professionalism,'' Mr. Jagger said, deadpan.

A terrible yowling became audible. In an adjoining dressing room, Keith Richards was waving a bottle and leading Mr. Wood, the keyboard player Ian McLagan, and the drummer Charlie Watts, among others, through a series of vocal-group imitations. This was no band of drug abusers; it was ''the boys'' having a boozy good time to psych themselves up for the show. Only Mr. Jagger, who has been very careful about his health during the tour, and the bassist Bill Wyman, who was standing in another room in an immaculate yellow stage suit, sipping at a drink, seemed to be above the fray.

The Rolling Stones finally began their set at the Fox Theater at 10:35 P.M., and although the audience had waited more than an hour since the end of the Stray Cats' performance, they soon seemed to forget their impatience. The band sounded magnificent. Mr. Jagger was improvising, reaching for notes that were not in the original melodies of Stones evergreens like the opening ''Under My Thumb'' and ''Let's Spend the Night Together.'' Mr. Richards, who used to stay close to his amplifier and microphone, was all over the stage, moving like a dervish and kicking off song after song with guitar rhythms that were utterly authoritative, always in the right tempo and the right groove.

Yes, there were mistakes. Mr. Richards would yell, ''I've got it,'' and take a guitar solo, only to find that Mr. Wood hadn't heard him and was soloing too. There were abrupt endings and missed cues. And none of this mattered at all. The band, raging like a forest fire, burned up 26 songs in less than two hours, yet every song got the attention it deserved; none was thrown away or walked through.

So this was the stuff the millions were clamoring to see. No wonder. The Rolling Stones' Atlanta show was one of the most exciting rock concerts I have ever seen, and the fans seemed to agree. By the time they had stopped cheering and begun to file out of the theater, the Stones were on their way to Houston.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: March 26, 2019 22:18

Going by the original itinerary, the dates that were added late are the Lexington, Tempe, Kansas City and Hampton shows. Not sure exactly when they were added but it was def after the tour had started.

But what I want to know is when and why the shows at the BJCC Arena in Birmingham and Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale (Long Island) NY got cancelled. (Especially the Long Island shows: the Stones are the only major band from the "classic rock" era to have never played this venue.)
Both cities are listed in the tour program and the official itineraries (whereas Lexington, Tempe, Kansas City and Hampton aren't). So I'm curious as to why they suddenly got dropped.


Also, for completists, here is a partial list of some other shows/venues the Stones looked at for the 1981 tour that never happened and/or were moved to another venue (pardon if they've already been listed here. I'll link the sources later). FYI: the first four intended to happen after Sir Morgan's Cove but while the band were still in the New England-area.

*Orpheum Theater, Boston

*Ocean State Performing Arts Center, Providence

*The Palladium, Worcester

*Fenway Park, Boston (intended as a possibility to makeup for the all the MA fans who wanted to see them)

*The Ritz, New York

*Park West, Chicago

*Rainbow Music Hall, Denver

*Perkins Palace, Pasadena (near Los Angeles)

*undetermined small club/theater, San Francisco

*undetermined small club/theater, New Orleans

*Reunion Arena, Dallas

*Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Phoenix

*Omni Coliseum, Atlanta

*2nd show @ Superdome, New Orleans

*Arlington Stadium, Arlington TX (never would have happened: the Texas Rangers have a staunch no concert policy at their ballpark due to damages that might occur and the costs of re-planting the field)

*Metropolitan Sports Center, Bloomington MN (where the Stones played in 1972; alternative to Saint Paul, where they ended up performing but appeared at first to be problematic due to the riots there in 1978)

*Silver Bowl (Sam Boyd Stadium), Las Vegas

*Capital Theater, Passaic, NJ



[rollingstonesphotosfromphilly.files.wordpress.com]

[rollingstonesphotosfromphilly.files.wordpress.com]

[rollingstonesphotosfromphilly.files.wordpress.com]

[rollingstonesphotosfromphilly.files.wordpress.com]

I'll try to find the other sources I got these from later.



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-27 05:29 by stevecardi.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 27, 2019 00:55



These are the images that stevecardi posted the links to above.













Thanks, Steve!

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: stevecardi ()
Date: March 27, 2019 03:01

You're welcome Exile. I'll try to track down the other sources detailing the arena shows in Dallas, Phoenix and Atlanta, and the reports of a Las Vegas show (that latter one really caught my eye!)

And thank you for this killer thread, and keeping it alive!

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 30, 2019 03:52

















Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 31, 2019 03:48











Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 31, 2019 18:53

VIENNA

Mick Jagger, in Vienna promoting the Rolling Stones tour, 1982 wire voor promoten van de Rolling Stones tour.
April 1982 wire press photo









Felix Zeitlhofer photos - Mick Jagger, The Rolling Stones, Vienna,1982


According to the Time Is On Our Side website: "April 28-30, 1982: Mick Jagger holds press
conferences in London, Vienna, Munich and Paris announcing the Rolling Stones' 1982 European Tour."

[www.timeisonourside.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-31 20:03 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 31, 2019 20:24

SHEPPARTON

  
  May 17, 1982 photo by Bill Wyman

Keith takes a break at Shepparton Studios where the
Rolling Stones were rehearsing for their upcoming 1982
Euorpean Tour.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: March 31, 2019 20:57


Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 1, 2019 01:24


Shelley Lazar, Danny Bruno 1983 NYC.jpg

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 1, 2019 18:28


Rock Journalist Lisa Robinson & Keith Richards

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 2, 2019 01:06

Philadelphia Inquirer, The (PA) - December 4, 1981
Author/Byline: HARRY HARRIS
Edition: FEATURES ARTS + LEISUREPage:
C31Readability: >12 grade level (Lexile: 1310)


TV/RADIO TALK -
JAGGER GRANTS RONA BARRETT AN INTERVIEW

By Harry Harris


Rona Barrett

Inquirer TV Writer

Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones granted Rona Barrett his first TV

interview in nearly 10 years earlier this week. It will be included in the

premiere of NBC's " Television: Inside and Out" at 10 p.m. tomorrow. So will

the first interview with Rock Hudson since his open- heart surgery.

Jagger says he consented to talk to Barrett " because I'm more in sympathy

with her hairdo than that other lady's." Presumably he was referring to ABC's

principal celebrity interviewer, Barbara Walters .

" Besides," Jagger added, " my astrologer said it would be propitious."

Another reason, apparently, is that it gave Jagger a chance to talk about a

close friend, John Lennon, a year after his death.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-02 01:10 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 4, 2019 01:46






Special Thanks to Historic Images HistoricImages.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-08 18:22 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 6, 2019 03:19

RELEASE DATES: WHEN OLD IS AS GOOD AS NEW - DO FANS CARE WHEN SONGS WERE RECORDED?

Daily News of Los Angeles (CA) - July 26, 1993
Author/Byline: Fred Shuster Daily News Music WriterEdition: ValleySection: L.A.
LIFEPage: L5Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1130)




It has been reported widely that the Rolling Stones' 1981 "Tattoo
You" album was primarily made up of songs recorded in 1973 and 1976. The
practice brings up the question of whether an artist's integrity is violated if
old material is passed off as new.

Record company officials did not wish to comment. But for some fans, ethics
considerations are overshadowed by the perceived value of new-old tracks.

"I don't mind because there's a wealth of material out there that should be
available to die-hard fans," said North Hollywood resident Scott Segelbaum, 34,
an avid Beatles and Stones collector. "In fact, I like the idea. As a Beatles
fan, I want to hear everything they recorded. It doesn't matter to me if it's
considered their best work or not. Just because a band has changed or
progressed doesn't mean what they did in the past was not valid."

Segelbaum said he sees no problem with the custom of mixing old with new as
long as the decision was made by the artist and not extraneous forces.

"The band knows what it wants to put on the market," he said. "It's possible an
older track might fit an album's overall concept better than something more
current."

In the case of the Stones, whose sound has changed little over the past few
decades, the material from the mid-'70s didn't seem out of place when first
released in 1981.

"There's no point in misleading people, but if it's a good record, it doesn't
matter in the end," said guitarist and Stones aficionado Audley Freed of the
North Carolina band Cry of Love. "The real fans find out all that stuff
anyway."

Some music buyers aren't thrilled with the possibility they may not be getting
the very latest music from an artist.

"When I buy a new album, I want to be sure I'm getting the freshest material
the artist has to offer," said TV producer Roland Seeman, 34, of Reseda. "I
don't want to feel I'm getting retreads or stuff that wasn't good enough to
make it onto previous albums."

Usually, though, buyers are getting the very latest music from an artist,
unless the disc in question is a clearly marked reissue or collection of older
tracks.

When a record company last year issued a compilation of '60s tracks by Taj
Mahal and Ry Cooder's obscure Los Angeles band, the Rising Sons, Cooder blasted
the release.

"There's nothing worthwhile about it," he said at the time. "There's nothing
even interesting on it. It should never have come out."

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 7, 2019 19:24

HOUSTON


1981 Press Photo - Crowd lines up for Rolling Stones tickets at Houston Astrodome
September 25, 1981


Between 500 and 600 people lined up beginning at 7 a.m. today to buy tickets for the Rolling Stones
performance in the Astrodome October 28. Announcement that the tickets were on sale was made on
local radio stations. By 10 a.m., 25,000 tickets had been sold. Pace Concerts, sponsors of the event,
said ticket sales are limited to 10 per person.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-07 22:35 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 7, 2019 22:52

RE: JAGGER GRANTS RONA BARRETT AN INTERVIEW
By Harry Harris


Rona Barrett

--

A Big Thanks to JordyLicks96 for finding the 1981 Rona Barrett interview video! It's cool how I just posted
an article about the Rona Barrett - Mick jagger interview. Two days later Jordy Licks post the long lost video.

ExileStones


+++++++


from the: Rare Mick Jagger Interview 1981 thread [iorr.org]

Quote
JordyLicks96
This is a great interview from Mick during the '81 tour that was just posted on YouTube, especially what he says when the interview ends in response to his answer to the last question..."You can always edit that last bit." spinning smiley sticking its tongue out


Rare Mick Jagger Interview 1981
[www.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-08 00:04 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 7, 2019 22:58

1981 RONA BARRETT INTERVIEW


         
         
Mick Jagger with American gossip columnist Rona Barrett during an interview in 1981.





















Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-04-07 23:13 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 8, 2019 18:09

Quote
Kennedy
Does anyone have a copy of Time magazine from early in the 81 tour with the Stones review? I believe it had pics from the Philly opener as well as from 81.



I'm not familiar with this issue of Time magazine. In the Rona Barrett interview at apx 9:39-10:30, Mick complains
that the writer of this Time magazine article gave a bad review of the Philadelphia opening show and the writer
was NOT at the concert!



Rare Mick Jagger Interview 1981 (JordyLicks96)
[www.youtube.com]



Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: April 8, 2019 19:52

CLEVELAND











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