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Re: "Exhibitionismn" trip
Posted by: bam ()
Date: May 27, 2017 02:59

The Art Institute is a great museum, as are many other Chicago museums.

To get outside, many folks enjoy the Chicago Architecture Foundation tours -- especially their river cruises. Both are fairly close to Navy Pier.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-05-27 03:00 by bam.

Re: "Exhibitionismn" trip
Posted by: J.J.Flash ()
Date: May 27, 2017 03:37

Go outside and get a pic by the giant tongue. Also as said already don't miss the mixing board. fun stuff.You can take pics with your cell phone.

Re: "Exhibitionismn" trip
Posted by: Marhsall ()
Date: May 27, 2017 17:19

Hey thanks everybody.

We'll be checking out 'Beggars Banquet' tonight & fireworks,

"Well my heavy throbbers itchin' just to lay a solid rhythm down"

Re: "Exhibitionismn" trip
Posted by: chrisvw ()
Date: May 27, 2017 19:42

glad that you're planning to catch beggars banquet tonight!

the link for the dock is thedockatmontrosebeach.com for the exact address. it is right off the lake, about 10 minutes north of navy pier. we'll try to save some tables near the front of the stage; you're welcome to join us!

and you may want to bring an extra sweater; chicago is notably "cooler by the lake"!

Re: "Exhibitionismn" trip
Posted by: Marhsall ()
Date: May 27, 2017 19:46

Hey Chris,
That's great! Thank you so much! We'll see you there.

"Well my heavy throbbers itchin' just to lay a solid rhythm down"

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: wickerman ()
Date: May 30, 2017 07:12

Hey guys, looking for a discount/promo code for Chicago as I will be able to visit the exhibition this Wednesday. Any tips much appreciated!

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: June 6, 2017 20:51

Chicago, see The Rolling Stones’ Exhibitionism show for free

Here’s one for those among you that love Mick, Keith, and the rest with all your heart. Exhibitionism, an exhibit dedicated to the history of The Rolling Stones, is now at Chicago’s Navy Pier, and we’re giving away three pairs of tickets. The endeavor boasts 500 rare pieces of memorabilia, including costumes and instruments, from the band’s archives spread out across about 15,000 square feet of space.

All you need to do to enter is send an email avcontests@theonion.com with the subject line “Rolling Stones Exhibitionism” and your full name between now and next Tuesday, June 13. The tickets will be held at will call at the Navy Pier box office.

[www.avclub.com]

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: TKinOH ()
Date: June 11, 2017 19:15

Rolled up to Chicago yesterday and checked out Exhibitionism... So awesome and well worth the trip!

If you have the chance to see it, don't think about it, just go! Loads of stuff in there that a fan would have never had a chance to see up close... I loved all the stage design sketches and models, and the artwork and details that are poured over leading up to a release or tour are always worth a look!

This band doesn't have it's reputation by accident, they have nurtured every aspect of their careers from the start, and I feel lucky to have a glimpse behind the scenes and into the collection of all these years and memories!

Go see Exhibitionism when you get a chance!

Exhibitionism in Los Angeles?
Posted by: Shott ()
Date: June 27, 2017 17:08

Anyone know when it will start? Thank you.

Re: Exhibitionism in Los Angeles?
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: June 27, 2017 18:26

I thought the next city would be Las Vegas. At least that's what was posted: [iorr.org]

Re: Exhibitionism in Los Angeles?
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: July 6, 2017 15:54

Dressing the Stones: Designers talk about ‘Exhibitionism’ fashions

ENTERTAINMENT 07/05/2017, 06:07pm

Miriam Di Nunzio


Some of the fashions worn by the Rolling Stones on display at "Exhibitionism" at Navy Pier. | MIRIAM DI NUNZIO PHOTO

Alexander McQueen. Prada. Saint Laurent. Jean Paul Gaultier. Ossie Clark. Tommy Nutter.

You have just stepped into the closets of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman.

And if you visit “Exhibitionism,” the 18,000-square-foot Rolling Stones extravaganza on display through July 30 at Navy Pier, you can get an up-close look at the fashions created by the aforementioned designers (and a few more) for the iconic rockers and their legendary world tours.

But a glance at the clothes reveal them not merely as stage costumes, but in large measure as one-of-a-kind works of art — reflective of pop culture and the fashion sense of the men who wore them, most notably Jagger, who became deeply entrenched in every facet of every tour, from the set design to the lighting to every stitch of clothing in which he pranced and paraded.

“I think what really stood out to their audiences was the fact that the guys weren’t wearing costumes. Those were their real clothes,” said acclaimed American fashion designer Anna Sui, who consulted on the fashion gallery for “Exhibitionism,” and whose first couture line of men’s fashions ended up on Jagger’s frame.


The Ossie Clark black and red ensemble foreground with Omega T-shirt and cape worn by Mick Jagger at Altamont and Madison Square Garden 1969. Charlie Watts crystal-embellished shirt (background) worn during the band’s 1972 U.S. tour. | MIRIAM DI NUNZIO PHOTO

“And they were wearing clothes that they borrowed from their girlfriends. They were the first [major rockers] to wear jewelry, ruffles, velvet. They were real dandies. And it kind of changed the way men were dressing. Men became the peacocks of the moment. Suddenly, these guys were wearing longer hair, boots with heels, tight velvet pants, skin-tight shirts and these brocade-type jackets. It just broke the style mode for men. It was part of their whole liberation as musicians and as men.”

The Stones may have begun their music journey wearing identical suits and haircuts (much like their British Invasion counterparts), but they quickly eschewed the look, and Sui said it forever changed how tours were designed.
The Stones’ clothing also reflected their music, whether it was a song title, or lyric or tone, completely derailing rock bands’ homogeneous sensibilities.

“I think some of the designers really did look at the general aura of an album and a tour,” Sui said, “what the band was trying to personify at the moment. They went through their bluesy period, their psychedelic period, so their style was also being influenced by this. Mick more than the rest was always going to major designers for his tour clothes. And that’s why everybody remembers what he wore. If you look at Altamont, for example, the Ossie Clark black and red [ensemble] when Mick is singing ‘Sympathy for the Devil,’ he certainly had a devilish look about him! Mick was being very provocative with everything he wore and I really think that was intentional. When he wore the Ossie Clark panne velvet jumpsuits (there are several featured at the Navy Pier exhibit) they’re really more of a woman’s costume. But it was all about being provocative.

“Keith Richards became the standard for the rock star look,” Sui added. “How many [rockers] did you soon see walking around with aviator shades and using those big prayer scarves such as his and the flair pants with the conchos down the side?”


Famed British designer Ossie Clark created the long-sleeved golden yellow jumpsuit for Mick Jagger in 1972, and the sleeveless blue velvet jumpsuit for the band’s 1972 U.S. tour. | MIRIAM DI NUNZIO PHOTO

Sui would ultimately see her designs on national television thanks to Jagger. “The first time I did a men’s clothing line on the runway, Mick became my first customer,” she said. “He was [appearing on] ‘Saturday Night Live’ [in 1993] and I got this call from his [assistant] that he wanted everything I had just debuted for men. And he wore [some of it] on the show. Either he saw it at the [runway] show or his stylist saw it. But he wanted it all.”

Tony Award-winning costume designer William Ivey Long (who was recently nominated for an Emmy Award for his work on “Grease: Live!” on Fox, and presented with the Art Institute’s “Legend of Fashion” award” in 2003) was enlisted to design Jagger’s stagewear for the 1989 Steel Wheels tour. Six of his pieces are featured in “Exhibitionism,” including a blue leather Eisenhower jacket with the Stones’ iconic lips logo on the back, and a green leather Regency jacket, reminiscent of the 18th century. The clothing was couture, pure and simple.


For the Stones’ Steel Wheels Tour in 1989, William Ivey Long created this blue Eisenhower jacket with a handpainted Rolling Stones logo for Mick Jagger, accompanied by black pants with Steel Wheels Tour logo trapuntoed down the side seams. | MIRIAM DI NUNZIO PHOTO

“For the blue leather jacket, I handpainted the lips [logo] on the back and then sandpapered it to make it look [distressed],” Long said. “For those tight black pants I basically took the Steel Wheels logo and made it out of silver fabric and trapuntoed it down the sides of each leg, greatly accenting the vertical.”

Long said he knew the ante had been upped for Steel Wheels because of the massive scale and effects tied to the stage design. He met with Jagger and they looked at sketches and bolts of fabrics, from velvets to leathers to brocades, and mockups of some of the shirts and jackets. He eventually made 56 different items for Jagger, and often met the band on various tour stops to add pieces or, in once instance, replace a handpainted Andy-Warhol-influenced shirt that was stolen by an intrepid fan. “It cost $1,800 back in 1989,” Long said, “so think of its value today. It was a one-of-a-kind, when you think about it.”

Long added that the lighting and stage design called for massive use of jewel tones in Jagger’s wear in order to make him stand out to the very last row of a 30,000-seat arena. “We spent hours picking out these gorgeous greens and even goldenrod yellows to stand out against Mark Fisher’s sets,” Long said. “I didn’t make anything black for Mick, except pants, because everything he wore had to really sing.”

And as for that eternal question, “Do the clothes make the man, or does the man make the clothes?” Long didn’t skip a beat.

“In the case of Mick Jagger, the man most definitely makes the clothes. He could wear a paper bag and make it look fabulous because it’s really about the charisma of the wearer.”



William Ivey Long’s sketch for Mick Jagger, Rolling Stones: Steel Wheels Tour. The green leather jacket is inspired by the Great Britain’s Regency period (during the reign of King George III). The jacket features sleeves that tied onto the shoulder, with open underarms. The pants were tightly fitted in a stretch wool with a stirrup, and had the Steel Wheels logo on the trapuntoed stripe down the side. | COURTESY WILLIAM IVEY LONG STUDIO


William Ivey Long’s original sketch for Mick Jagger’s blue leather jacket featuring the handpainted Stones logo on the back, which was then “distressed” with sandpaper. | COURTESY WILLIAM IVEY LONG STUDIO

NOTE: For a limited time, you can purchase a special ticket combo package, featuring a fast-pass ticket to Navy Pier’s Centennial Wheel along with a flexi ticket to “Exhibitionism” for $39, beginning July 5. Visit navypier.com or the Centennial Wheel ticket booth at the pier.

[chicago.suntimes.com]

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: 35love ()
Date: July 6, 2017 17:36

(copied from above)

In the case of Mick Jagger, the man most definitely makes the clothes. He could wear a paper bag and make it look fabulous because it’s really about the charisma of the wearer.”

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: thegroove ()
Date: July 12, 2017 06:24

I wentyesterday and was quite impressed.It ends soon so if youre in the area you might check Exhibitionism out.July 29 a Stones cover band is playing on the pier.Rock and Roll.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: rollmops ()
Date: July 18, 2017 16:40

I just booked my flight from DC!! I will be at the Navy Pier, Chicago on 07/27.
I am very excited; I adore the Stones since 1976. Everything they do get my interest and my respect. So glad they are still around and kicking!
Rockandroll,
Mops

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: StonedInTokyo ()
Date: July 21, 2017 22:33

Traveled from TOKYO to attend Exhibitionism on Chicago's Navy Pier yesterday. I paid $95.00 for the VIP laminate even though there was no line and probably less than 10 people there during the 90 minutes that I walked thru it. What I found most interesting were the scale models of the touring stages. However, my overall experience ended on a bad note, which I'll explain now. I was told upon entry that photos were ok but no flash and no video, to which I said fine. I proceeded to shoot with a small Nikon point and shoot camera. Just as a entered the clothing gallery a rent a cop providing security for the exhibition approached me and said "You are welcome to take photos with a cellphone, but no cameras. They should have told you upon entry". I looked at her like she was kidding, and when I realized she was not I explained I just traveled 8,000 miles to attend this and I don't have a cellphone with me. She said, "They don't want anyone using cameras" to which I said "Then I guess I'm done" and proceeded towards the exit. However, I was not able to leave immediately as the last portion of the exhibit is a five minute 3D feature, and they wouldn't let anyone thru that room while it was playing. I guess the staff could sense I was upset because they asked if something was wrong, to which I said "I was taking photos with a camera and security took it upon themselves to hassle me over it". When they handed me the 3D glasses for the next feature I firmly declined, stating "No. I'm done. I'm leaving." and walked out. The organizers can stick Exhibitionism where the sun don't shine.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-07-21 22:37 by StonedInTokyo.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: Librarian ()
Date: July 22, 2017 02:33

Got my tix- I will be going next week.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: July 22, 2017 03:13

Quote
StonedInTokyo
Traveled from TOKYO to attend Exhibitionism on Chicago's Navy Pier yesterday. I paid $95.00 for the VIP laminate even though there was no line and probably less than 10 people there during the 90 minutes that I walked thru it. What I found most interesting were the scale models of the touring stages. However, my overall experience ended on a bad note, which I'll explain now. I was told upon entry that photos were ok but no flash and no video, to which I said fine. I proceeded to shoot with a small Nikon point and shoot camera. Just as a entered the clothing gallery a rent a cop providing security for the exhibition approached me and said "You are welcome to take photos with a cellphone, but no cameras. They should have told you upon entry". I looked at her like she was kidding, and when I realized she was not I explained I just traveled 8,000 miles to attend this and I don't have a cellphone with me. She said, "They don't want anyone using cameras" to which I said "Then I guess I'm done" and proceeded towards the exit. However, I was not able to leave immediately as the last portion of the exhibit is a five minute 3D feature, and they wouldn't let anyone thru that room while it was playing. I guess the staff could sense I was upset because they asked if something was wrong, to which I said "I was taking photos with a camera and security took it upon themselves to hassle me over it". When they handed me the 3D glasses for the next feature I firmly declined, stating "No. I'm done. I'm leaving." and walked out. The organizers can stick Exhibitionism where the sun don't shine.

Sorry that happened to you but at the risk of offense, it seems odd that you would wait to find out "at the door" re the camera policy after traveling so far if it were a deal breaker. If they had told you at the door re only cel phone cameras you would have (apparently) been just as out of luck w no cel phone.

Personally, I don't worry about taking pictures of such items, as there are typically professional ones abundant on the web etc.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: filstan ()
Date: July 24, 2017 22:20

I finally made it out to Navy Pier for Exhibitionism early Saturday afternoon. I would have preferred to have gone on a weekday afternoon when there would be less people, but friends that wanted to join me were not able to change schedules. All the way out at the end of Navy Pier through the mob of tourists meant it was a brisk walk out there, but it was nice and cool once inside.

The exhibit was enjoyable and I'm glad I went. Some cool items on display, some photos I had never seen, very impressive collection of guitars with descriptions was for sure awesome. The studio remake was well done, the Edith Grove rooms a laugh, and it was fun to play around with the different mixes you could put together with a few songs. I liked playing around most with Miss You, and Rocks Off the most. It would have been nice if they had provided a wider range of song choices. Keith diary from the early days was cool to see in that very tiny little book he used. Original lyric write-ups were also fun to look at. The 3D concert video of Satisfaction from Hyde Park? was well done.

All things considered it was time well spent and any Stones fan would enjoy what they put together. Happy I was finally able to see it!

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: rollmops ()
Date: July 28, 2017 17:23

I just came back from Chicago few hours ago. The exhibition was worth the trip from DC. I advise any rolling stones fan to check it out. I enjoy looking and being very closed to anything that belonged to Brian Jones; his clothe and his instruments.The "Edith Grove" flat's reenactment is a trip! The mixing board interaction was also fantastic. I isolated Keith's guitar tracks on song like "Honky Tonk Women, start me up, Rocks off, Angie, Gloom and Doom. So you can heard perfectly what Keith played on these tracks. It's impressive how original inventive, inconventional his style is. It'sn't polished at all but so GOOD. I was so surprised to hear his pick scratching to strings which usually would have the producer asked
for another take. That was the highlight of my very plaisant experience; the dissection of Keith's work on the great Rolling Stones's songs.
Rockandroll,
Mops

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: bam ()
Date: July 30, 2017 08:08

I finally saw it Saturday 29 July, the next-to-last day of the Chicago run. I enjoyed it. I brought a friend I'd taken to the 1975 Chicago Stadium show. She really enjoyed the exhibit.

We arrived when it opened at 11, and there was a small line to get in. It never was crowded. They've been advertising discounted tickets the past few weeks.

You all know the details of the exhibit. A couple of quibbles. The sound from each area bled too much into the neighboring areas. Also, for a diehard fan, the clip from the 50 and Counting tour already looks out of date, with MT playing acoustic in the background in Satisfaction. But being up to date is not what the exhibit is about.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: 2120Joe ()
Date: August 1, 2017 04:21

I was at Navy Pier today having enjoyed the exhibit twice previously. July 30 was the last day. Exhibitonism has closed.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: August 2, 2017 22:29

Quote
MisterDDDD
Quote
StonedInTokyo
Traveled from TOKYO to attend Exhibitionism on Chicago's Navy Pier yesterday. I paid $95.00 for the VIP laminate even though there was no line and probably less than 10 people there during the 90 minutes that I walked thru it. What I found most interesting were the scale models of the touring stages. However, my overall experience ended on a bad note, which I'll explain now. I was told upon entry that photos were ok but no flash and no video, to which I said fine. I proceeded to shoot with a small Nikon point and shoot camera. Just as a entered the clothing gallery a rent a cop providing security for the exhibition approached me and said "You are welcome to take photos with a cellphone, but no cameras. They should have told you upon entry". I looked at her like she was kidding, and when I realized she was not I explained I just traveled 8,000 miles to attend this and I don't have a cellphone with me. She said, "They don't want anyone using cameras" to which I said "Then I guess I'm done" and proceeded towards the exit. However, I was not able to leave immediately as the last portion of the exhibit is a five minute 3D feature, and they wouldn't let anyone thru that room while it was playing. I guess the staff could sense I was upset because they asked if something was wrong, to which I said "I was taking photos with a camera and security took it upon themselves to hassle me over it". When they handed me the 3D glasses for the next feature I firmly declined, stating "No. I'm done. I'm leaving." and walked out. The organizers can stick Exhibitionism where the sun don't shine.

Sorry that happened to you but at the risk of offense, it seems odd that you would wait to find out "at the door" re the camera policy after traveling so far if it were a deal breaker. If they had told you at the door re only cel phone cameras you would have (apparently) been just as out of luck w no cel phone.

Personally, I don't worry about taking pictures of such items, as there are typically professional ones abundant on the web etc.

A similar incident happened to me only I had one of those Sony Bloggies. The guard came up to me and told me no cameras so I used the cell phone - which has a camera. I even showed her the Bloggie and she said no cameras.

Well, honey, it's no rock 'n' roll show.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: StonedInTokyo ()
Date: August 7, 2017 10:22

Quote
MisterDDDD
Quote
StonedInTokyo
Traveled from TOKYO to attend Exhibitionism on Chicago's Navy Pier yesterday. I paid $95.00 for the VIP laminate even though there was no line and probably less than 10 people there during the 90 minutes that I walked thru it. What I found most interesting were the scale models of the touring stages. However, my overall experience ended on a bad note, which I'll explain now. I was told upon entry that photos were ok but no flash and no video, to which I said fine. I proceeded to shoot with a small Nikon point and shoot camera. Just as a entered the clothing gallery a rent a cop providing security for the exhibition approached me and said "You are welcome to take photos with a cellphone, but no cameras. They should have told you upon entry". I looked at her like she was kidding, and when I realized she was not I explained I just traveled 8,000 miles to attend this and I don't have a cellphone with me. She said, "They don't want anyone using cameras" to which I said "Then I guess I'm done" and proceeded towards the exit. However, I was not able to leave immediately as the last portion of the exhibit is a five minute 3D feature, and they wouldn't let anyone thru that room while it was playing. I guess the staff could sense I was upset because they asked if something was wrong, to which I said "I was taking photos with a camera and security took it upon themselves to hassle me over it". When they handed me the 3D glasses for the next feature I firmly declined, stating "No. I'm done. I'm leaving." and walked out. The organizers can stick Exhibitionism where the sun don't shine.

Sorry that happened to you but at the risk of offense, it seems odd that you would wait to find out "at the door" re the camera policy after traveling so far if it were a deal breaker. If they had told you at the door re only cel phone cameras you would have (apparently) been just as out of luck w no cel phone.

Personally, I don't worry about taking pictures of such items, as there are typically professional ones abundant on the web etc.

It seems odd to me such an insipid and downright asinine camera policy would be formulated for this exhibit, let alone enforced. If they'd told me at the door it was cellphones only I would not have paid $95.00 to enter. The deal breaker isn't the policy as such, the deal breaker is being hassled after I have paid $95.00 and I'm just minding my own business. Exhibitionism isn't the only thing I traveled to Chicago for, but it was the main thing. Regardless, when it does come to Tokyo, I'm not going. They took advantage of me once, but never again.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-08-07 10:24 by StonedInTokyo.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: mickschix ()
Date: August 8, 2017 00:29

I saw this exhibit in NYC in March and carried in my small Nikon and shot photos at will...no one said anything. That's really a shame that StonedInTokyo was hassled! The staff in New York was extremely kind & helpful..I was weeks away from a hip replacement and after nearly 3 hours of walking and standing, I was in serious PAIN! A nice staff member went to get a chair for me! Very sweet! I recall reading that there would be authentic smells in the Edith Grove section, the rooms that were constructed to resemble their first apartment. I did not detect and smells....did anyone else think that was strange?sad smiley

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: StonedInTokyo ()
Date: August 12, 2017 07:13

Quote
mickschix
I recall reading that there would be authentic smells in the Edith Grove section, the rooms that were constructed to resemble their first apartment. I did not detect and smells....did anyone else think that was strange?sad smiley

I don't recall reading the Edith Grove reconstruction would be ever scented at all, and it wasn't when I went. I cannot fathom how having a scented exhibit in the spirit of "authenticity" would increase tickets sales. By this logic, they may as well invite attendees to hock phlegm into it.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: CaptainCorella ()
Date: August 12, 2017 07:25

Quote
StonedInTokyo
Traveled from TOKYO to attend Exhibitionism on Chicago's Navy Pier yesterday. I paid $95.00 for the VIP laminate even though there was no line and probably less than 10 people there during the 90 minutes that I walked thru it. What I found most interesting were the scale models of the touring stages. However, my overall experience ended on a bad note, which I'll explain now. I was told upon entry that photos were ok but no flash and no video, to which I said fine. I proceeded to shoot with a small Nikon point and shoot camera. Just as a entered the clothing gallery a rent a cop providing security for the exhibition approached me and said "You are welcome to take photos with a cellphone, but no cameras. They should have told you upon entry". I looked at her like she was kidding, and when I realized she was not I explained I just traveled 8,000 miles to attend this and I don't have a cellphone with me. She said, "They don't want anyone using cameras" to which I said "Then I guess I'm done" and proceeded towards the exit. However, I was not able to leave immediately as the last portion of the exhibit is a five minute 3D feature, and they wouldn't let anyone thru that room while it was playing. I guess the staff could sense I was upset because they asked if something was wrong, to which I said "I was taking photos with a camera and security took it upon themselves to hassle me over it". When they handed me the 3D glasses for the next feature I firmly declined, stating "No. I'm done. I'm leaving." and walked out. The organizers can stick Exhibitionism where the sun don't shine.

Sorry you had a bad time.

It's a dreadful example of Jobsworth mindlessness taking the place of common sense.

My partner takes her photography very seriously. She has a very pricey Canon DLSR with a range of lenses.

But lately she's stopped using it (most of the time). The reason is that her Galaxy S8 takes much better photos in most circumstances. Given that we go to galleries a lot, she's taken masses of excellent photos with it.

--
Captain Corella
50+ Years a Fan

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: HankM ()
Date: August 12, 2017 09:35

I wonder if they will keep this a traveling exhibit for years and years or if they plan on setting up a permanent museum someplace at some time. I didn't get to see it, it was not close to me, but I would be curious what it all looked like... on a slow cold rainy day when there were no lines, not many people and no uppity security goofs.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: His Majesty ()
Date: August 16, 2017 01:01

Is the Street Fighting Man cassette recorder and recording still part of the exhibit?

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: erikjjf ()
Date: August 30, 2017 16:09

[www.rollingstones.com]

Opening at The Palazzo in Las Vegas, September 23rd.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-08-30 16:13 by erikjjf.

Re: The Rolling Stones Exhibitionism
Posted by: corriecas ()
Date: August 30, 2017 16:47

When will it open in Holland..

Jeroen

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