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Re: Stones airplane in '72 and '73
Posted by: HEILOOBAAS ()
Date: March 31, 2016 03:10

Quote
mrpaulincanada
I think we should continue this discussion in public, IORRers will be better served by being educated into the finer points of aviation engineering and triviaspinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Yessir, please tell us the meaning of V1 and V2.

Re: Stones airplane in '72 and '73
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: March 31, 2016 03:46

ADF?

Re: Stones airplane in '72 and '73
Posted by: mrpaulincanada ()
Date: March 31, 2016 06:15

V1

"the maximum speed in the takeoff at which the pilot must take the first action (e.g., apply brakes, reduce thrust, deploy speed brakes) to stop the airplane within the accelerate-stop distance. V1 also means the minimum speed in the takeoff, following a failure of the critical engine at VEF, at which the pilot can continue the takeoff and achieve the required height above the takeoff surface within the takeoff distance."

v2

Takeoff safety speed. The speed at which the aircraft may safely be climbed with one engine inoperative.

ADF

An automatic direction finder (ADF) is a marine or aircraft radio-navigation instrument that automatically and continuously displays the relative bearing from the ship or aircraft to a suitable radio station.[10][11] ADF receivers are normally tuned to aviation or marine NDBs operating in the LW band between 190 – 535 kHz. Like RDF units, most ADF receivers can also receive medium wave (AM) broadcast stations, though as mentioned, these are less reliable for navigational purposes.


I hope this helps eye popping smileyeye popping smiley

Re: Stones airplane in '72 and '73
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: March 31, 2016 18:59

ILS glideslope and localizer?

Re: Stones airplane in '72 and '73
Posted by: mrpaulincanada ()
Date: April 1, 2016 00:19

ILS is an acronym for Instrument Landing System

It is made up of two radio beams that continuously display on the aircraft instruments whether is is above, on, or below the ideal glidepath, and a second beam which displays on the aircraft whether is is lined up with the centreline(localizer) of the runway. If the aircraft is on both the proper glidepath and localizer, then a landing can be made safely.Typically, an aircraft can fly as low as 200ft above ground and approx 1/2 mile back from the landing runway using the ILS.

There are more precise ILS systems that allow aircraft to land in weather with only 600ft of visibilty. Modern day airliners and business jets can do automatic landings with very low or non-existent forward visibilty and low cloud ceilings.

I hope this helpshot smiley

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