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Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: LuxuryStones ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:15

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FP
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smokeydusky
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Mathijs
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FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

I am not sure what you mean by "tremelo"? Do you mean the guitar effect produced by a peddle, which I would say the right hand guitar on "I Got The Blues" has applied or do you mean "arpeggio" as in picking the notes of a chord rather than strumming he chord? From what I can see of the live performances Taylor plays some arpeggios of the chords and then basically doubles up Richards guitar chords with the same "Chuck Berry" groove but in standard tuning rather than open G. While on the alternate take below he does the same and adds a brief solo. It is interesting that the counter melody he developed over the chorus in live performance happened later than the recording, showing how working a song in live can bring up cool ideas. I prefer the live versions of many of their songs simply because the LP version is over familiar and Taylor (when not over playing) adds some nice extra melodies. I actually feel like something is missing when I hear the studio version of BS now when I listen to it!

Taylor never overplayed on stage, imo.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: Eleanor Rigby ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:46

Quote
Mathijs
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

Absolutely correct. The tremelo picked guitar is during the Eflat/C/Aflat/Bflat portion, which live he also sometimes played with slide. During the verses Taylor normally plays a Berry-style rhythm live.

Mathijs

The Nicaragua show from 73 give a great indication what Taylor does on this song live.
He is way loud on that tape.
I doubt dandie and HM ever play that show :-)

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:46

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DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
Quote
Mathijs
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DandelionPowderman
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kleermaker
As for I Got The Blues, who plays which guitar? I think Taylor on the right, Richards on the left. What do you think, Dandie?

This song is, together with Shake Your Hips, an example of beautiful weaving by Taylor and Keith.

On I Got The Blues, Taylor starts the song in the left channel (in my headphones anyway), while Keith's guitar is in the right.

It's kinda hard to tell who's who in this, because Taylor is playing lots of licks that Keith normally would do (1:47, for instance). His precision reveals him, though smiling smiley

Taylor on left, Richards right. Taylor is the dry clean tone, Richards the guitar with the tremelo effect.

Mathijs

I doubted it, and thought he would be on the right, so I said that (because they can fool us, those guys, you know). But the main reason is that the left guitar starts the song and normally Richards is the first one can hear. But the bluesy sound of the left guitar resembles Taylor on IGTB during the Marquee 'show' in 71. So now I also think Taylor is on the left.

He is on the left, and he is indeed starting the song, just as he does on Bitch smiling smiley

Indeed, two exceptions to the rule. I don't know any more by heart (if there are any).

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:49

Quote
FP
What about the guitar parts on Dead Flowers and Bitch? On Dead Flowers I always assumed the left hand soloing that sounds like a peddle steel was Al Perkins but when I got the CD the credits say Taylor as lead guitar? If this is so Does Keith do the main solo? And on Bitch is it Richards or Taylor on lead as Taylor says it's him while everyone else thinks Keith!


DF: very clear which one is Keith and which one is Taylor. Hint: Taylor on the right.
Bitch: It's Keith on lead, but Taylor's rhythm guitar sounds like lead too. cool smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2014-01-22 16:51 by kleermaker.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Date: January 22, 2014 16:50

Quote
Eleanor Rigby
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

Absolutely correct. The tremelo picked guitar is during the Eflat/C/Aflat/Bflat portion, which live he also sometimes played with slide. During the verses Taylor normally plays a Berry-style rhythm live.

Mathijs

The Nicaragua show from 73 give a great indication what Taylor does on this song live.
He is way loud on that tape.
I doubt dandie and HM ever play that show :-)

More than you think smiling smiley

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:52

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LuxuryStones
Quote
FP
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

I am not sure what you mean by "tremelo"? Do you mean the guitar effect produced by a peddle, which I would say the right hand guitar on "I Got The Blues" has applied or do you mean "arpeggio" as in picking the notes of a chord rather than strumming he chord? From what I can see of the live performances Taylor plays some arpeggios of the chords and then basically doubles up Richards guitar chords with the same "Chuck Berry" groove but in standard tuning rather than open G. While on the alternate take below he does the same and adds a brief solo. It is interesting that the counter melody he developed over the chorus in live performance happened later than the recording, showing how working a song in live can bring up cool ideas. I prefer the live versions of many of their songs simply because the LP version is over familiar and Taylor (when not over playing) adds some nice extra melodies. I actually feel like something is missing when I hear the studio version of BS now when I listen to it!

Taylor never overplayed on stage, imo.

Even better: Taylor never overplayed.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 16:53

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
Eleanor Rigby
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

Absolutely correct. The tremelo picked guitar is during the Eflat/C/Aflat/Bflat portion, which live he also sometimes played with slide. During the verses Taylor normally plays a Berry-style rhythm live.

Mathijs

The Nicaragua show from 73 give a great indication what Taylor does on this song live.
He is way loud on that tape.
I doubt dandie and HM ever play that show :-)

More than you think smiling smiley

I doubt if His M. knows this boot. Listening to it would make him itchy. smiling smiley

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Date: January 22, 2014 16:58

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kleermaker
Quote
FP
What about the guitar parts on Dead Flowers and Bitch? On Dead Flowers I always assumed the left hand soloing that sounds like a peddle steel was Al Perkins but when I got the CD the credits say Taylor as lead guitar? If this is so Does Keith do the main solo? And on Bitch is it Richards or Taylor on lead as Taylor says it's him while everyone else thinks Keith!

It's Keith, but Taylor's rhythm guitar sounds like lead. cool smiley

Keith is playing lead through the whole song, as well as acoustic guitar.

Taylor plays longer licks, though, during the verses and the choruses - and eventually the solo.

Keith did a hilarious mistake in there, btw (3:17) thumbs up




Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Date: January 22, 2014 17:00

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kleermaker
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
Eleanor Rigby
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

Absolutely correct. The tremelo picked guitar is during the Eflat/C/Aflat/Bflat portion, which live he also sometimes played with slide. During the verses Taylor normally plays a Berry-style rhythm live.

Mathijs

The Nicaragua show from 73 give a great indication what Taylor does on this song live.
He is way loud on that tape.
I doubt dandie and HM ever play that show :-)

More than you think smiling smiley

I doubt if His M. knows this boot. Listening to it would make him itchy. smiling smiley

Of course he does! They played It's All Over Now, Route 66 and Stray Cat Blues grinning smiley

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: LuxuryStones ()
Date: January 22, 2014 17:00

Quote
kleermaker
Quote
LuxuryStones
Taylor never overplayed on stage, imo.

Even better: Taylor never overplayed.

thumbs up

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 17:03

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
Quote
FP
What about the guitar parts on Dead Flowers and Bitch? On Dead Flowers I always assumed the left hand soloing that sounds like a peddle steel was Al Perkins but when I got the CD the credits say Taylor as lead guitar? If this is so Does Keith do the main solo? And on Bitch is it Richards or Taylor on lead as Taylor says it's him while everyone else thinks Keith!

It's Keith, but Taylor's rhythm guitar sounds like lead. cool smiley

Keith is playing lead through the whole song, as well as acoustic guitar.

Taylor plays longer licks, though, during the verses and the choruses - and eventually the solo.

Keith did a hilarious mistake in there, btw (3:17) thumbs up



My remark concerned Bitch. As for DF: two lead guitars I would say. Taylor on the right and indeed playing the solo. In this song their styles are distinctive enough to recognize them both easily.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 17:05

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DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
Eleanor Rigby
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

Absolutely correct. The tremelo picked guitar is during the Eflat/C/Aflat/Bflat portion, which live he also sometimes played with slide. During the verses Taylor normally plays a Berry-style rhythm live.

Mathijs

The Nicaragua show from 73 give a great indication what Taylor does on this song live.
He is way loud on that tape.
I doubt dandie and HM ever play that show :-)

More than you think smiling smiley

I doubt if His M. knows this boot. Listening to it would make him itchy. smiling smiley

Of course he does! They played It's All Over Now, Route 66 and Stray Cat Blues grinning smiley

Indeed! I'm curious about his comment on All Over Now and Route.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: Mathijs ()
Date: January 22, 2014 17:29

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kleermaker
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
As for I Got The Blues, who plays which guitar? I think Taylor on the right, Richards on the left. What do you think, Dandie?

This song is, together with Shake Your Hips, an example of beautiful weaving by Taylor and Keith.

On I Got The Blues, Taylor starts the song in the left channel (in my headphones anyway), while Keith's guitar is in the right.

It's kinda hard to tell who's who in this, because Taylor is playing lots of licks that Keith normally would do (1:47, for instance). His precision reveals him, though smiling smiley

Taylor on left, Richards right. Taylor is the dry clean tone, Richards the guitar with the tremelo effect.

Mathijs

I doubted it, and thought he would be on the right, so I said that (because they can fool us, those guys, you know). But the main reason is that the left guitar starts the song and normally Richards is the first one can hear. But the bluesy sound of the left guitar resembles Taylor on IGTB during the Marquee 'show' in 71. So now I also think Taylor is on the left.

Taylor indeed starts the song on the left channel. Richards guitar part is somewhat less fluid than Taylor's, and there are some licks Richards uses again on Let it Loose.

Mathijs

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: Mathijs ()
Date: January 22, 2014 17:35

Quote
FP
Quote
smokeydusky
Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.
Mathijs

Rather than the "I hear it"/"I hear it not" thing, you can see in both CS Blues and the Dick Cavett Show during the third verse, Taylor appears to be playing a "Berry-like rhythm" with his left hand and strumming (not tremolo picking) with his right.

By '73, was doing something different with the slide.

(In BS, I'd call what he used to do quavers, starting with the version at Altamont. I hear him tremolo picking in SV and during CYHMK in 2013.)

I am not sure what you mean by "tremelo"? Do you mean the guitar effect produced by a peddle, which I would say the right hand guitar on "I Got The Blues" has applied or do you mean "arpeggio" as in picking the notes of a chord rather than strumming he chord? From what I can see of the live performances Taylor plays some arpeggios of the chords and then basically doubles up Richards guitar chords with the same "Chuck Berry" groove but in standard tuning rather than open G. While on the alternate take below he does the same and adds a brief solo. It is interesting that the counter melody he developed over the chorus in live performance happened later than the recording, showing how working a song in live can bring up cool ideas. I prefer the live versions of many of their songs simply because the LP version is over familiar and Taylor (when not over playing) adds some nice extra melodies. I actually feel like something is missing when I hear the studio version of BS now when I listen to it!





There is also this one from 1969 with some slide by Taylor I presume?



Tremelo picked as in arpeggio indeed. PLaying the chord note by note instead of as one chord. Live taylor's part resembled the part he plays on this outtake, I guess it is the original take from Muscle Shoals, which in the end was dropped completely.

The second (slide) version is with Eric Clapton, recorded December 18, 1970.

Mathijs

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: smokeydusky ()
Date: January 22, 2014 18:26

Quote
kleermaker
Indeed, two exceptions to the rule. I don't know any more by heart (if there are any).

In Wild Horses, the opening acoustic is in Taylor's channel.





I recall hearing a version that started center and panned to Taylor's
channel but cannot locate it now.

It's been a while since I listened to Sticky Fingers, but my recollection is that Richards is in one channel throughout all of Side A and then flips to the other channel for Side B. (And I think Taylor gets pushed out of his channel for Sway and another song.)

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: His Majesty ()
Date: January 22, 2014 18:32

Quote
kleermaker

I'm curious about his comment on All Over Now and Route.

The arrangement of It's All Over Now makes it a bit cheesy and predictable, the sax and guitar soloing weaken it. It lacks the power and energy of the TAMI show version and the groove and sexyness of the especially recorded for January 1967 London Palladium version.









Route 66 is cool, but boring compared to the expressive energetic freedom of the 1965 live version on Got Live ep/Decembers Children/Live 1965.





Those songs don't really suit Taylor line up at that time imo. I bet they would have done them better in 1969.



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 2014-01-22 18:57 by His Majesty.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: smokeydusky ()
Date: January 22, 2014 19:30

Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Richards plays all guitars. Taylor's original part as can be heard on the outtakes, have been removed completely for the released track. What you hear is about five Keith parts. Left is the original open G track from Muscle Shoals, right is a rhtyhm track by Richards that is composed from three or 4 tracks. There's 2 guitars doing little one-string runs, a stanard tuned guitar doing a Berry-like rhythm, and during the verses (woo!) there's an overdub of an open G tuned guitar. And Richards does the acoustic. But basically, Taylor doesn't play on the released version of BS.

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.

There's about 6 or 7 outtakes of BS, and it is very interesting to hear how the production continued, with Richards first taking bits out of Taylor's track and overdubbing onto it, then replacing it altogether. Version III even has an overdubbed solo that sounds like Taylor, later removed again.

Mathijs

Trouser Press '79
Q Are there certain tracks you recorded with the Stones that you are particularly proud of?
A Quite a few: "Honky Tonk Women," "Brown Sugar," the whole Sticky Fingers album. There's things on every album I like, whether they feature me or not. They wrote some great songs.

I suppose "BS" could fall into the "feature me ... not" category or even the "most of the ballads were usually written by me" rabbit hole, but it seems odd that BS is mentioned in the response if he's not on the official release.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: elunsi ()
Date: January 22, 2014 19:54

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DandelionPowderman
Quote
DiscoVolante
I've always seen Sticky Fingers (and Goats Head Soup) as a Jagger/Taylor album; while Let it bleed and Exile being Keith's.

Brown Sugar
Wild Horses
CYHMK
YGM
Bitch
IGTB
SM
DF

Sway and MM are probably the only songs that somewhat fit your description.

Maybe not a Jagger/Taylor album, but a Jagger album. He has at least 5 songs written mainly by him.
Which brings me back to the discussion about what M.Taylor said, that MJ was the main song-writer and you said until 1972 it was Keith who wrote most of the songs. I think this album proofs that Mick was a full song (-music, meldoy) writer, not only the lyricwriter, much earlier than 1972.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Date: January 22, 2014 20:10

Quote
elunsi
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
DiscoVolante
I've always seen Sticky Fingers (and Goats Head Soup) as a Jagger/Taylor album; while Let it bleed and Exile being Keith's.

Brown Sugar
Wild Horses
CYHMK
YGM
Bitch
IGTB
SM
DF

Sway and MM are probably the only songs that somewhat fit your description.

Maybe not a Jagger/Taylor album, but a Jagger album. He has at least 5 songs written mainly by him.
Which brings me back to the discussion about what M.Taylor said, that MJ was the main song-writer and you said until 1972 it was Keith who wrote most of the songs. I think this album proofs that Mick was a full song (-music, meldoy) writer, not only the lyricwriter, much earlier than 1972.

How do you know Mick wrote 5 songs by himself for this album?

We don't even know how much Keith contributed on, say, Sway. Did Mick teach him all the harmony vocals he did on the Hopkins tape, did he shape this himself, did Taylor write more than we know?

We just don't know - it's speculation, songwriting-wise.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2014-01-22 20:11 by DandelionPowderman.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: FP ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:18

Quote
kleermaker
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
Quote
FP
What about the guitar parts on Dead Flowers and Bitch? On Dead Flowers I always assumed the left hand soloing that sounds like a peddle steel was Al Perkins but when I got the CD the credits say Taylor as lead guitar? If this is so Does Keith do the main solo? And on Bitch is it Richards or Taylor on lead as Taylor says it's him while everyone else thinks Keith!

It's Keith, but Taylor's rhythm guitar sounds like lead. cool smiley

Keith is playing lead through the whole song, as well as acoustic guitar.

Taylor plays longer licks, though, during the verses and the choruses - and eventually the solo.

Keith did a hilarious mistake in there, btw (3:17) thumbs up



My remark concerned Bitch. As for DF: two lead guitars I would say. Taylor on the right and indeed playing the solo. In this song their styles are distinctive enough to recognize them both easily.

This is interesting as I would say the left hand solo feels more fluid and like Taylor to me while the twangier lead on the right feel more Richards. Also the licks on this live recordings that Taylor plays sound more like the solo style of the left hand solo on the record.




Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: FP ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:20

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
kleermaker
Quote
FP
What about the guitar parts on Dead Flowers and Bitch? On Dead Flowers I always assumed the left hand soloing that sounds like a peddle steel was Al Perkins but when I got the CD the credits say Taylor as lead guitar? If this is so Does Keith do the main solo? And on Bitch is it Richards or Taylor on lead as Taylor says it's him while everyone else thinks Keith!

It's Keith, but Taylor's rhythm guitar sounds like lead. cool smiley

Keith is playing lead through the whole song, as well as acoustic guitar.

Taylor plays longer licks, though, during the verses and the choruses - and eventually the solo.

Keith did a hilarious mistake in there, btw (3:17) thumbs up



It is amazing how long you can listen to a song and not notice a clanger like this! Now I will always here the bum note ha ha!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2014-01-22 20:20 by FP.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:24

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RobberBride
Quote
FP


Sway
Did Keith write the chords and as he was not about Jagger learned them for the session or is it a Jagger song with Jagger/Richards credit

Would say its a Jagger song with a shared credit.

Just as Jagger has zero to do with Happy but gets half the credit.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:25

Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?

Richards plays all guitars. Taylor's original part as can be heard on the outtakes, have been removed completely for the released track. What you hear is about five Keith parts. Left is the original open G track from Muscle Shoals, right is a rhtyhm track by Richards that is composed from three or 4 tracks. There's 2 guitars doing little one-string runs, a stanard tuned guitar doing a Berry-like rhythm, and during the verses (woo!) there's an overdub of an open G tuned guitar. And Richards does the acoustic. But basically, Taylor doesn't play on the released version of BS.

Live in 1972 and 1973 Taylor would play very close to his original rhythm track, which is a tremelo picked guitar.

There's about 6 or 7 outtakes of BS, and it is very interesting to hear how the production continued, with Richards first taking bits out of Taylor's track and overdubbing onto it, then replacing it altogether. Version III even has an overdubbed solo that sounds like Taylor, later removed again.

Mathijs

That version in the hotel room in GIMME SHELTER has some kind of lead line. Is that Taylor? Seems like it.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:37

Quote
FP
Can't You Hear Me Knocking
Again in the interview above Taylor says Richards plays the famous opening riff on the right which seems quite obvious, although it is possible it has been double tracked by Taylor at some point as it is so fat! On the left there is another simpler rhythm part which I presume is Taylor but could also be Richards. This stays until the famous jam section. Taylor says that he simply kept playing when they came to the end of the song section and everyone else joined in, which means that the jazzy rhythm part that starts the jam at 2.43 on the right is Taylor? However it feels more like Richards with the elegant fills on the left under the sax solo being Taylor unless both parts are Taylor? The fills turn into the solo which is definitely Taylor. The solo is great IMO but I think Lester Bangs said he hoped the "boring solo" wasn't Richards when he reviewed the album! The final catchy riff at the end is started ion the lead guitar but doubled up by the rhythm part so could be a precomposed part by Richards, which suggests the jam was a planned thing rather than a spontaneous bit of luck.

That clean jangly chord guitar in the verses has to be Taylor. I've never gotten the idea that the intro riff was anyone but Keith nor double tracked. The 'jam' part was no way spontaneous! It's way too precise to be just something that 'happened'. There's the slicing almost Flamenco guitar licks in the sax solo - those must be Keith, while that dedsending/ascending chord playing has to be Taylor.

One of the greatest if not THE greatest guitar solos ever recorded, what Taylor did on that. The ending is spectacular.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: elunsi ()
Date: January 22, 2014 20:39

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
elunsi
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
DiscoVolante
I've always seen Sticky Fingers (and Goats Head Soup) as a Jagger/Taylor album; while Let it bleed and Exile being Keith's.

Brown Sugar
Wild Horses
CYHMK
YGM
Bitch
IGTB
SM
DF

Sway and MM are probably the only songs that somewhat fit your description.

Maybe not a Jagger/Taylor album, but a Jagger album. He has at least 5 songs written mainly by him.
Which brings me back to the discussion about what M.Taylor said, that MJ was the main song-writer and you said until 1972 it was Keith who wrote most of the songs. I think this album proofs that Mick was a full song (-music, meldoy) writer, not only the lyricwriter, much earlier than 1972.

How do you know Mick wrote 5 songs by himself for this album?

We don't even know how much Keith contributed on, say, Sway. Did Mick teach him all the harmony vocals he did on the Hopkins tape, did he shape this himself, did Taylor write more than we know?

We just don't know - it's speculation, songwriting-wise.

We know it because Taylor said that Mick wrote Sway. IF Keith added something, it is still a Jagger song. Like Brown Sugar, IF Keith added something or not, it is still a Jagger song.
We also donĀ“t know if or what Mick added on the Keith songs but you would still call them Keiths songs.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: straycatblues73 ()
Date: January 22, 2014 21:18

Quote
His Majesty
Quote
kleermaker

I'm curious about his comment on All Over Now and Route.

The arrangement of It's All Over Now makes it a bit cheesy and predictable, the sax and guitar soloing weaken it. It lacks the power and energy of the TAMI show version and the groove and sexyness of the especially recorded for January 1967 London Palladium version.





Route 66 is cool, but boring compared to the expressive energetic freedom of the 1965 live version on Got Live ep/Decembers Children/Live 1965.



Those songs don't really suit Taylor line up at that time imo. I bet they would have done them better in 1969.


the boot suffers severely in audio quality but its one of my favourites , being unrehearsed and through lack of playing very different from the 72 shows,
its unique in many ways ,
straycat regained its outro while happy got one too !
great guitars in YCAGWYW and a superfast dead flowers.
not to mention a glorious no expectations with keiths guitarpicking at its best and a great slide!





Quote
Mathijs
Quote
FP
Any idea who plays what on Brown Sugar?








Tremelo picked as in arpeggio indeed. PLaying the chord note by note instead of as one chord. Live taylor's part resembled the part he plays on this outtake, I guess it is the original take from Muscle Shoals, which in the end was dropped completely.

.

Mathijs


surely that's two keith tracks with a dubbed taylor solo ?

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: His Majesty ()
Date: January 22, 2014 21:26

I don't like that No Expectations, too slow and the slide is dodgy.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: straycatblues73 ()
Date: January 22, 2014 21:36

Quote
His Majesty
I don't like that No Expectations, too slow and the slide is dodgy.

really ? I love keiths playing there and the slide is nice but easy too !

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: His Majesty ()
Date: January 22, 2014 21:37

Quote
straycatblues73
Quote
His Majesty
I don't like that No Expectations, too slow and the slide is dodgy.

really ? I love keiths playing there and the slide is nice but easy too !

Yeah, it's not for me, I like Hyde park 1969 version though.

Re: Mick Taylor - Sticky Fingers guitar contributions
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: January 22, 2014 21:40

I love dodgy slides

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