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Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: DiamondDog7 ()
Date: March 16, 2021 16:48

Quote
Silver Dagger
1968 - Electric Ladyland. Sonically and songwise streets ahead of anything else.

1969 - Let It Bleed. Abbey Road runs a close second but is let down by a few duffers on side 1.

1971 - Sticky Fingers/Who's Next tie at No 1.

1972 - Exile On Main Street. Nothing else comes near.

1968 - Electric Ladyland

1969 - Tommy

1970 - Bitches Brew

1971 - What's Going On

1972 - Exile On Main Street

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Bjorn ()
Date: March 16, 2021 16:49

Ziggy Stardust and Transformer - Bowie and Reed 1972. But I prefer Exile.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Witness ()
Date: March 16, 2021 16:51

Myself I am not so pleased about such pseudo-objective rankings, apparently lifted above personal tastes in music.

If one strong album from 1972 is sought, think about the debut album from Roxy Music with the same title.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: loog droog ()
Date: March 16, 2021 16:53

I'm not a fan of the "Big Four" term, because it places all the importance on the albums of that period, while ignoring the significance of their singles.

Rock n' Roll started as a singles medium. The album was initially a collection of those songs, and other tracks that were often designed as filler.

The album as a self-contained work wasn't the brain-child of rock artists, but it became popular in the late '60's, and as album-oriented FM Rock stations pulled the older listening audience away from AM Top-40 stations, was suddenly viewed with this special gravity. Albums were now Serious Art. Singles became scorned as something for 7th graders...


The problem with talking about the "Big Four" is that it omits two very significant Stones songs that were released in the same period that were singles: "Jumpin' Jack Flash," which I have long maintained is the Greatest Rock Record of All Time, and "Honky Tonk Women," which is right up there as well.

The "Big Four" label also manages to exclude Ya-Ya's, an album that made a big statement about their abilities outside of the studio.

That's why I'll go with "Golden Age" to cover that '68-'72 period.


As for a "Big Four" by another artist:

My Aim Is True
This Year's Model
Armed Forces
Get Happy!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-03-16 16:54 by loog droog.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Elmo Lewis ()
Date: March 16, 2021 17:19

Quote
tatters
Quote
slewan
hard to beat Bob Dylan's big four in a row:
Binging It All Back Home / Highway 61 Revisited / Blonde On Blonde / John Wesley Harding

How about Stevie Wonder's Big Four?

Talking Book
Innervisions
Fulfillingness' First Finale
Songs in the Key of Life

About as good a run as anyone has ever had.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: stickyfingers101 ()
Date: March 16, 2021 18:21

1) Anything by Hendrix in any year is better than everything by everybody else in any year

2) James Brown "Say it Loud, I'm Black and Proud" - 1969

3) Miles Davis "Bitches Brew" - 1970

4) Marvin Gaye "What's Going On" - 1971

5) Stevie Wonder "Talking Book" - 1972 (he also released "Music of My Mind" the same year)

Disclaimer: What is "better" or "best" is subjective to the listener...I don't claim 2-5 are "better," but certainly get much play on my turntable and, IMO, are stand-outs in their respective years.

if we are going by the critics, don't...."Exile" was not received well until a well after 1972....so, maybe it is "the best" today, but it certainly wasn't considered as such previously.

the critics are often wrong (wildly so...see below)...so, trust your ears...what you think is the best, is the best.

[www.rollingstone.com]

(ps...I stand by #1...I'll plant my flag and die on Hendrix Hill)

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: March 16, 2021 18:55

Not making any comparison to specific bands or specific years, but Pink Floyd had an amazing "Big Four" run starting in '73 with Dark Side of the Moon,
followed by Wish You Were Here in '75, then Animals in '77, and finally The Wall in '79.

And Led Zeppelin...their entire catalogue minus their last album made for an amazing "Big Seven" album run starting with LZ I in '69,
LZ II also in '69, LZ III in '70, LZ IV in '71, Houses of the Holy in '73, Physical Graffitti in '74, and finally Presence in '77.

And then there's the Beatles...an amazing run in such a short period, changing the world of music in the process every step of the way.

Think what you will about either of the above bands, but the amount of quality material they cranked out in a relatively short time span is
amazingly jaw dropping when you think of the snails pace that most bands of today function at - including classic bands who used to be prolific (see Stones).

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:24

Quote
peoplewitheyes
Tommy, live at Leeds, Who's Next, Quadrophenia

The first three are great (I have them all), but to me Quadrophenia sucks.
Comparison with the Rolling Stones in those years: there is this beautiful silver cloud ever floating well above the top of Mount Fuji. Well, that's where the Rolling Stones reside. The top of Mount Fuji itself I reserved for The Who. Other great bands and solists you can find at the snowy upper part of that beautiful (not bleeding) vulcano.
You got it ... if that vulcano ever decides to explode, all is gone, but that silver cloud will remain untouched cool smiley
smileys with beer

I'm a GHOST living in a ghost town

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:38

Why does no one mention Led Zeppelin? One through Physical Graffiti are among the most dynamic, sonically adventurous albums of all time. And that's a Big Five. 1969 was quite the year, CSN album, LIB, Abbey Road, Blind Faith, but I still find Led Zeppelin's debut album to be the album of that stellar year.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:44

I did mention Led Zeppelin, and One through Physical Graffiti would actually be be a Big Six, though I pushed it to Big Seven because I think Presence is an excellent album as well.

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: EddieByword ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:49

Quote
treaclefingers
Quote
EddieByword
GHS, Black and Blue, Some girls and Undercover..................drinking smiley

I know this will seem heretical but I would have preferred some surgery on the original GHS and adding the three new cuts which I love.

Had that occurred, we'd be referring to that period as the BIG FIVE.

I definitely agree - All the rage is fantastic

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:51

Quote
Silver Dagger
Quote
Big Al
Good post, Silver Dagger.

I feel Let it Bleed just edges Abbey Road, too.

I think Sticky Fingers and Who's Next are quite evenly matched, yet the former is just a teeny weeny bit weaker, for me. It's mightily close, though. Actually, 1971 is probably the year for landmark, 'classic rock' releases.

I suspect you're right regarding 1972. Aside from Dark Side of the Moon, I can't think, offhand, what other seminal releases there were.

Hi Al,

Dark Side Of The Moon was taken on the road by the Floyd in 72 but the album came out in 73.

Recording for DSOTM was started in May 1972 and finished in January 1973. They worked the songs up during their live shows in 1972 but they were mostly changed for the recording. A proper tour for the album followed its release in the spring of 1973.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: EddieByword ()
Date: March 16, 2021 19:57

or: Superb but not better..............

Ian Dury - New boots and panties

Billy Idol - Cyberpunk

Roger Waters - Amused to death

Lee Perry - Superape

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: March 16, 2021 20:06

The beauty of great albums is that they exist. Nobody's is "better". It's not the Olympics with pointless medals. Does listening to STICKY FINGERS more than ABBEY ROAD mean that SF is better? LOL how long is a piece of string?

Sometimes critics are right and sales do say something about how good something is. Not every song on EXILE or BACK IN BLACK and whatever is great ie five stars for everyone. Aside from some of the nutballs here, has anyone that says BIB (or EOMS for that matter) is one of the greatest albums ever actually listened to the entire album? Most people ie casual rock music fans know only three songs from BIB. I only say that based on experience. Quite a few times I've been with some people when Have A Drink or Noise Pollution came on the radio or jukebox and they didn't know it was from "Oh I LOVE that album!" BIB.

People say "blind as a bat" yet bats have great vision. I love UNDERCOVER but I know it's not a great album in the ranks of BEGGARS-EXILE as an artistic existence of development - although, if it had better songs on it... might be more loved/higherly ranked.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Elmo Lewis ()
Date: March 16, 2021 21:50

"Live At Fillmore East" and "Eat A Peach" are calling.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Angus MacBagpipe ()
Date: March 16, 2021 23:00

Bruce had a tremendous streak of good stuff:
Born to Run
Darkness on the Edge of Town
The River
Nebraska
...and adding two more to the big four:
Born in the USA
Tunnel of Love

75’ to 87’ - not too many artists have a run that long.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2021-03-16 23:02 by Angus MacBagpipe.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: March 16, 2021 23:08

To me, Bruce sounds like he had the runs vs. having had a good run between 75’ to 87', but either way, it is a long time.
No doubt he was born to run.....................

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: birdie ()
Date: March 16, 2021 23:25

Bruce also had Greetings and the Wild and Innocent, both from ‘73. That’s and incredible run of albums from ‘73-‘87.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-03-16 23:27 by birdie.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: March 17, 2021 00:35

None .

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: DGA35 ()
Date: March 17, 2021 01:20

Two of my favourite bands in high school with their own classic 4: Van Halen 1, Van Halen 2, WACF, Fair Warning. Powerage, If You Want Blood, Highway To Hell, Back In Black. Zep 1-4.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: March 17, 2021 02:00

The beauty of whoever's Big Four or whatever amount of albums in a row is that they exist from The Beatles, The Who, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and AC/DC and on and on and on.

Pink Floyd's DIRTY WORK is THE FINAL CUT.

The weight of all of those great releases is where their historical aspects truly matter, regardless of the intensity of their relevance: what AC/DC did doesn't have the socially heavy aspects that the Stones and Beatles and Who had, they're probably more in line with Led Zeppelin in regard to building a fan base through great albums, next to no promotion singles wise, while having a run of great music.

The British Invasion music was connected to the variances of the shifts in culture (and even politics to some degree) even outside of the UK. They were part of the soundtrack for generational changes.

When I was in my early 20s I read UME and Melody Maker to keep up with what was going on in the UK because what was happening in the States had gotten rather bland, except for the Nirvana/Pearl Jam/Soundgarden/Alice/STP and a few others (Urge Overkill, Juliana Hatfield and even Elvis Costello was still doing some great music) eruption, which was the only thing interesting in an otherwise soulless music world. Lenny Kravitz and, oddly enough, Madonna, had provided some meat in terms of things changing for the better outside of the "grunge" movement. Prince had kind of fallen off. The Police were gone. The Cult had their moment abruptly end. Def Leppard was stuck on repeat. Men At Work and quite a few other sort of "alternative" acts had fallen away and, of course, Whacko Jacko was ridiculous. I had started to get into Nine Inch Nails and Ministry and RHCP and Dr Dre.

None of that, though, had the weight of the 1960s/1970s UK scene. The aspect of it mattering had changed.

I never could understand the fascination with Oasis.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: March 17, 2021 08:59

Great post, GasLightStreet!

Regarding Oasis: one observation I have is that in the U.K., the fascination transcends the music itself. They were a cultural phenomenon of sorts. Their image was everywhere. Outside the British Isles, I think their actual music did more of the talking and, less so, the wider interest. In a way, that’s better: it clouds the judgement far less. There’s a reason the U.S. lost interest after Wonderwall.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: peoplewitheyes ()
Date: March 17, 2021 12:31

Sorry Big Al, I guess I misunderstood your question...

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: March 17, 2021 13:06

Quote
peoplewitheyes
Sorry Big Al, I guess I misunderstood your question...

No apology necessary, peoplewitheyes.

This thread has evolved away from it's original premise, anyway! It's the 'Tell Me' way winking smiley

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: floodonthepage ()
Date: March 17, 2021 15:27

Quote
Big Al
I’ve been pondering: are the Stones’ ‘Big Four’ necessarily the best L.P. releases of their respective year. For example: is Beggars Banquet a greater release than The Beatles (White Album)? How does Let it Bleed hold-up against the mighty Abbey Road? For myself, it’s Sticky Fingers that poses the dilemma. I really think it’s such a tremendous record, but I partly feel that Who’s Next is a stronger release. Everything is subjective of course, and your favourite may not even be one of the 1968-1972 releases. It may be Some Girls, for instance; but how does that compare to Darkness on the Edge of Town?

If we're talking "Big Four", then....no. Nothing beats them, in my opinion. My favorite Jimi is Axis: Bold as Love so it doesn't cause a problem being from '67. My favorite Beatles is the White Album but it's no Banquet. As for Zeppelin, no contest for me, and truly my favorites from them came '70 (III) onward when they were more original and less, shall we say, "loose" with songwriter credits in '69....but I don't want to open that can of worms again.
The Who, also no contest, but Who's Next comes closest...but it's the size of Mars in the night sky of planet Sticky Fingers.

As for the great longer runs, yes...Stevie Wonder (5) and Springsteen come to mind (5+, depending on how far you'd take it from '73. I personally would stop it at '84).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-03-17 21:16 by floodonthepage.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Pietro ()
Date: March 17, 2021 20:59

I'm not an Elton John fan, but I couldn't help but notice how his music dominated the radio when I was in high school in the years 1972-1976. He was everywhere. An Elton John fan -- again, not me -- could argue that Elton John's five albums in the years 1972-1975 rivaled any run by any other group. These five albums appearing one after the other were all #1 in the U.S.:

Honky Chateau (1972)
Don't Shoot Me I'm the Piano Player (1973)
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (1973)
Caribou (1974)
Capt. Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy (1975)

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Elmo Lewis ()
Date: March 17, 2021 21:39

Quote
Pietro
I'm not an Elton John fan, but I couldn't help but notice how his music dominated the radio when I was in high school in the years 1972-1976. He was everywhere. An Elton John fan -- again, not me -- could argue that Elton John's five albums in the years 1972-1975 rivaled any run by any other group. These five albums appearing one after the other were all #1 in the U.S.:

Honky Chateau (1972)
Don't Shoot Me I'm the Piano Player (1973)
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (1973)
Caribou (1974)
Capt. Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy (1975)

I would even add late-1975's "Rock Of The Westies" to that list.

"No Anchovies, Please"

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: March 19, 2021 11:35

If we're now discussing other acts' 'Big 4', how about The Smiths?

The Smiths (1984)
Meat is Murder (1985)
The Queen is Dead (1986)
Strangeways, Here we Come (1987)


* toss-in the two compilations, Hatful of Hollow and The World Won't Listen, and you have an utterly tremendous run.

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: rayrad ()
Date: March 19, 2021 11:47

if we're talking 'big 4's from that period, how about:

happy sad (1969)
blue afternoon (1969)
lorca (1970)
starsailor (1970)

talk about a progression!

Re: Classic Albums Greater Than The Stones' 'Big Four'
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: March 19, 2021 12:05

Quote
rayrad
if we're talking 'big 4's from that period, how about:

happy sad (1969)
blue afternoon (1969)
lorca (1970)
starsailor (1970)

talk about a progression!

Without checking Google, I'll confess: I have no idea who you're on about!

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