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Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Turner68 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 06:39

Serious question for people who don't like "you gotta move": why?

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: AJDuffer ()
Date: December 24, 2015 07:41

You Gotta Move is a very good song. It just happens to be on an album with many exceptional songs. I have enjoyed asking Stones fans over the years to name their favorite Sticky Fingers songs, IN ORDER, and the answers vary considerably. I realize this is highly subjective, but my top SF songs, in order are: 1) Sister Morphine - one of my all-time favorites; 2) Dead Flowers; 3) Bitch; 4) Can't your hear me Knocking; 5) Brown Sugar; 6) Moonlight Mile; 7) Sway; 8) Wild Horses; 9) I Got the Blues; and 10) You Gotta Move.

Sticky Fingers is a masterpiece that is adored by Stones fans and even enjoyed very much by many non-Stones fans.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: December 24, 2015 07:53

Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Swayed1967 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 08:43

Quote
Turner68
Serious question for people who don't like "you gotta move": why?

Because it’s a joke - almost as bad as Jagger’s a cappella version in Gimme Shelter but not as funny. And it’s impossible to take seriously because unlike, say, Love In Vain, Jagger doesn’t sound remotely believable – this is a white man with back shoe polish on his face. Perhaps it would be more palatable if it were tacked on to a decent song, kinda like Bill Wyman’s snoring at the end of In Another Land.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: December 24, 2015 08:50

if it wasn't for theee Stones....A million white boys wouldn't have heard of You Gotta or Fred McDowell even though it was alive & kickin' in their own back yard ...



ROCKMAN

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: December 24, 2015 09:54

Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: matxil ()
Date: December 24, 2015 11:17

Quote
LeonidP
Quote
Turner68
I Got the Blues 6/10
Sister Morphine 6/10

Quote
Redhotcarpet
Wild Horses 3/10
Can't You Hear Me Knocking 6/10
You Gotta Move 1/10
Sister Morphine 6/10

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Sway 6/10

How do you even call yourselves Stones fans? ... absurd ratings for all-time classic tracks!

I find "Sister Morphine" a bit too tearjerker schmaltz to me, it doesn't ring true. I still gave it 7 out of 10 because the structure of the song is clever and it's played and sung well.
I have to admit though, this is coming from a guy who actually likes "Indian girl", so I am not sure I can really explain why I object to Sister Morphine. Maybe since IG is more over the top, more tongue in cheek, more camp I don't mind it so much. SM I find the weakest song on SF (of course they've made much worse in later albums).

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Turner68 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 11:22

Quote
matxil
Quote
LeonidP
Quote
Turner68
I Got the Blues 6/10
Sister Morphine 6/10

Quote
Redhotcarpet
Wild Horses 3/10
Can't You Hear Me Knocking 6/10
You Gotta Move 1/10
Sister Morphine 6/10

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Sway 6/10

How do you even call yourselves Stones fans? ... absurd ratings for all-time classic tracks!

I find "Sister Morphine" a bit too tearjerker schmaltz to me, it doesn't ring true. I still gave it 7 out of 10 because the structure of the song is clever and it's played and sung well.
I have to admit though, this is coming from a guy who actually likes "Indian girl", so I am not sure I can really explain why I object to Sister Morphine. Maybe since IG is more over the top, more tongue in cheek, more camp I don't mind it so much. SM I find the weakest song on SF (of course they've made much worse in later albums).

Well said. The lyrics to Sister Morphine are not up to the standards of the rest of the songs from the period.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: matxil ()
Date: December 24, 2015 11:27

Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Witness ()
Date: December 24, 2015 15:08

For the occasion I'll do one tabloid evaluation as I consider it at just this moment.

Brown Sugar 10 **/10
Sway 10/10
Wild Horses 10**/10
Can't You Hear Me Knocking 10*/10
You Gotta Move 9/10
Bitch 9,5/10
I Got the Blues 10*/10
Sister Morphine 10/10
Dead Flowers 10/10
Moonlight Mile 10***/10

Song for song ("atomistic" ) evaluation as contrasted with evaluation as a whole ("wholistic" ).

Especially EXILE ON MAIN STREET in my perspective scores relatively more as whole than STICKY FINGERS measured against individual evaluation. I have stopped ranking between their approximately 12 best and great albums.

Added in the edits: An explanation of the preceding paragraph: By that I mean that my individual scores for EOMS songs will tend to be markedly lower than for STICKY FINGERS really. However, as wholes I don't intend to separate them.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2015-12-24 15:22 by Witness.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: HMS ()
Date: December 24, 2015 16:54

Every song on Sticky Fingers is better than any song on EOMS (except Moonlight Mile which is awful to my ears). Sticky Fingers is the best album the Stones have released to this day. It even surpasses Let It Bleed. Without Moonlight Mile which only makes me scratch my head it probably would be the greatest rock-album of all time.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: December 24, 2015 18:35

Quote
matxil
Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Just try it Hairball, maybe you'll get what I'm talking about. I am only really speaking from my personal experience because I didn't like the tune too much when I first heard it on SF but a few years later when I started playing and singing it with some mates it all made sense and I've come to really appreciate it as the spiritual and powerful tune that it is. There is some ancient and instinctive magic to it that stirs some juju and bonds all who partake of it's elixir. I think The Stones must have experienced it too and it's inclusion of the record was probably more for them than it was for us....or something.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: hot stuff ()
Date: December 24, 2015 18:51

The Stones won Blues track of the year after it was released
and also in 75 during the Tour of America IN MANY
Rock Magazines in the States.

I never really liked it...But loved it when they played it
live in 75..They were having a blast doing it live
back then.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: December 24, 2015 18:56

Quote
Naturalust
Quote
matxil
Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Just try it Hairball, maybe you'll get what I'm talking about. I am only really speaking from my personal experience because I didn't like the tune too much when I first heard it on SF but a few years later when I started playing and singing it with some mates it all made sense and I've come to really appreciate it as the spiritual and powerful tune that it is. There is some ancient and instinctive magic to it that stirs some juju and bonds all who partake of it's elixir. I think The Stones must have experienced it too and it's inclusion of the record was probably more for them than it was for us....or something.

As I stated, 'I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album'.
The song is completely ingrained into my DNA at this point having listened to it millions of times since the days of my youth, learning to play guitar listening to this along with all my favorite bands/musicians via vinyl. One doesn't have to sing a song out loud to understand it - at least I don't. Besides, doesn't one 'sing along' in their heads anyways when listening to anything? Maybe if I was out in the woods camping with a group of friends by a campfire getting drunk it would indeed be fun which might be your point, but if I want to glean the true spiritual experience from this, or experience an 'ancient and instinctive magic to it that stirs some juju' as you say (nice description by the way), I'll listen to countless other truer version's which came before it which I would highly recommend for all. Why settle for less? Like all Stones cover versions (give or take one or two), they never can match the originals imo, and this one comes across as particularly uninventive without adding anything to set it apart. Not a horrible cover version, but a weak link to the album imo.

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: December 24, 2015 19:06

Quote
AJDuffer
You Gotta Move is a very good song. It just happens to be on an album with many exceptional songs. I have enjoyed asking Stones fans over the years to name their favorite Sticky Fingers songs, IN ORDER, and the answers vary considerably. I realize this is highly subjective, but my top SF songs, in order are: 1) Sister Morphine - one of my all-time favorites; 2) Dead Flowers; 3) Bitch; 4) Can't your hear me Knocking; 5) Brown Sugar; 6) Moonlight Mile; 7) Sway; 8) Wild Horses; 9) I Got the Blues; and 10) You Gotta Move.

Sticky Fingers is a masterpiece that is adored by Stones fans and even enjoyed very much by many non-Stones fans.

That's an interesting aspect other than just rating them - your favorites in order from most to least etc - barring in mind, of course, that some may not make the list because they're not your favorite. Or maybe perhaps it's not because you don't like the song but it's that it's slow - or not up enough - or not whacked out enough - but it's still good. With that in mind...

1. Can't You Hear Me Knocking
2. Brown Sugar
3. Sway
4. Sister Morphine
5. Bitch
6. Moonlight Mile
7. I Got The Blues
8. You Gotta Move
9. Wild Horses
10. Dead Flowers

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: December 24, 2015 19:09

Quote
Hairball

As I stated, 'I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album'.
The song is completely ingrained into my DNA at this point having listened to it millions of times since the days of my youth, learning to play guitar listening to this along with all my favorite bands/musicians via vinyl. One doesn't have to sing a song out loud to understand it - at least I don't. Besides, doesn't one 'sing along' in their heads anyways when listening to anything? Maybe if I was out in the woods camping with a group of friends by a campfire getting drunk it would indeed be fun which might be your point, but if I want to glean the true spiritual experience from this, or experience an 'ancient and instinctive magic to it that stirs some juju' as you say (nice description by the way), I'll listen to countless other truer version's which came before it which I would highly recommend for all. Why settle for less? Like all Stones cover versions (give or take one or two), they never can match the originals imo, and this one comes across as particularly uninventive without adding anything to set it apart. Not a horrible cover version, but a weak link to the album imo.

You're over thinking this one, the magic only comes when you try it. My point is that I actually believe the singing out loud is part of the magic of this one. I agree the Stones version is far from the best and it's my least favorite tune on the record too, but it's a tune where the true understanding only comes when the frequencies are generated from within. I'm not really trying to justify it as a great addition to SF, more trying to explain why they might have included it regardless.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: December 24, 2015 19:25

Quote
Naturalust
Quote
Hairball

As I stated, 'I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album'.
The song is completely ingrained into my DNA at this point having listened to it millions of times since the days of my youth, learning to play guitar listening to this along with all my favorite bands/musicians via vinyl. One doesn't have to sing a song out loud to understand it - at least I don't. Besides, doesn't one 'sing along' in their heads anyways when listening to anything? Maybe if I was out in the woods camping with a group of friends by a campfire getting drunk it would indeed be fun which might be your point, but if I want to glean the true spiritual experience from this, or experience an 'ancient and instinctive magic to it that stirs some juju' as you say (nice description by the way), I'll listen to countless other truer version's which came before it which I would highly recommend for all. Why settle for less? Like all Stones cover versions (give or take one or two), they never can match the originals imo, and this one comes across as particularly uninventive without adding anything to set it apart. Not a horrible cover version, but a weak link to the album imo.

You're over thinking this one, the magic only comes when you try it. My point is that I actually believe the singing out loud is part of the magic of this one. I agree the Stones version is far from the best and it's my least favorite tune on the record too, but it's a tune where the true understanding only comes when the frequencies are generated from within. I'm not really trying to justify it as a great addition to SF, more trying to explain why they might have included it regardless.

Understood, but when you're singing and/or playing it, you're more than likely referencing an earlier/superior version whether you know it or not as the Stones version is simply a copy of what came before it. For all I know, you're version is probably better than the Stones! And the misunderstanding (from my point) is that rather than you suggesting those who dislike it sing along with the album (which I thought you meant), you recommend them singing/playing it on it's own terms. Agreed, everyone should get out there and belt out You Gotta Move. But maybe first research the roots to get a better feel and understanding for it, rather than relying on a wealthy white British rock star 'preaching' the blues.

Why settle for less, when you can hear the sincerity and purity in this?
This old dude has some serious blues...

Mississippi Fred McDowell - You gotta move




_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: December 24, 2015 20:05

Quote
HMS
Every song on Sticky Fingers is better than any song on EOMS (except Moonlight Mile which is awful to my ears).

Uh huh.

And the earth is flat.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Turner68 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 20:39

Hairball I rarely disagree with you, but this time I do. The fact that the Stones didn't write You Gotta Move, or perform it as "authentically" as Fred McDowell does not reflect on whether or not it is a great track on Sticky Fingers

The Stones present their own arrangement of the song, and in some people's opinion (mine included), it's dynamite. In particular, I think Charlie's drumming is great, and I love the background singing.

But thanks to everyone who answered my question - before I didn't understand why some people give it a 0 or 1 out of 10, and now I do. I maintain my 10/10 rating for it however.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-12-24 20:43 by Turner68.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Turner68 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 20:42

Quote
GasLightStreet
Quote
AJDuffer
You Gotta Move is a very good song. It just happens to be on an album with many exceptional songs. I have enjoyed asking Stones fans over the years to name their favorite Sticky Fingers songs, IN ORDER, and the answers vary considerably. I realize this is highly subjective, but my top SF songs, in order are: 1) Sister Morphine - one of my all-time favorites; 2) Dead Flowers; 3) Bitch; 4) Can't your hear me Knocking; 5) Brown Sugar; 6) Moonlight Mile; 7) Sway; 8) Wild Horses; 9) I Got the Blues; and 10) You Gotta Move.

Sticky Fingers is a masterpiece that is adored by Stones fans and even enjoyed very much by many non-Stones fans.

That's an interesting aspect other than just rating them - your favorites in order from most to least etc - barring in mind, of course, that some may not make the list because they're not your favorite. Or maybe perhaps it's not because you don't like the song but it's that it's slow - or not up enough - or not whacked out enough - but it's still good. With that in mind...

1. Can't You Hear Me Knocking
2. Brown Sugar
3. Sway
4. Sister Morphine
5. Bitch
6. Moonlight Mile
7. I Got The Blues
8. You Gotta Move
9. Wild Horses
10. Dead Flowers


1. Brown Sugar
2. Moonlight Mile
3. Dead Flowers
4. Sway
5. Wild Horses
6. You Gotta Move
7. Can't You Hear Me Knocking
8. Bitch
9. Sister Morphine
10. I Got The Blues

However, all songs are a 10/10 except the last two.
.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-12-24 20:43 by Turner68.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: LeonidP ()
Date: December 24, 2015 20:47

Quote
matxil
Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Not sure what Indian Girl has to do w/ this in any way. I like it for my own personal taste, and can easily see why others might not. To me, beautiful guitars, I like the feel/slowness, the lyrics etc. But it can't even be in the same ballpark as anything on Sticky, nothing form Emotional can.

Unlike Indian Girl, Sticky Finger songs are not just 'my' taste -- it is a staple of the Stones catalog and Stones fans (90%, i'd say, at least) all over recognize it as a brilliant album from start to finish.

Summary:
- Indian Girl song, is a good song in my opinion
- Sticky Fingers, all the songs are great ... that is just a plain fact

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: pt99 ()
Date: December 24, 2015 21:10

Quote
HMS
Maybe their best album. Most following albums - except Black & Blue, Undercover and Dirty Work - are heavily suffering from too many fillers on it.

What is there to say about these great, great songs on Sticky Fingers, that hasn´t already been said? I am afraid I can add nothing new.

Most of the songs are simply masterpieces, there is no other word. My absolute favorites are Can´t You Hear Me Knocking, Sister Morphine, I Got The Blues and Sway. Of course, Brown Sugar, Bitch, Wild Horses are equally great. Well, Bitch maybe not that great, but extremly enjyoyable too.

All in all it is a milestone in rock music, it´s the Stones at their creative peak.

From Brown Sugar to Sister Morphine it is a marvelous album, but the last two tracks, Dead Flowers and Moonlight Mile, are unfortunately boring. They had better not included these two songs, they are the weak points of an otherwise very strong album. Dead Flowers is a half-hearted country-attempt, the result is pretty boring. Moonlight Mile is awful in any way, hardly listenable.

Eight out of ten points.

What drug are you taking? Moonlight Mile is perfect; epic. Dead Flowers is 10+

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: matxil ()
Date: December 24, 2015 21:44

Quote
LeonidP
Quote
matxil
Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Not sure what Indian Girl has to do w/ this in any way. I like it for my own personal taste, and can easily see why others might not. To me, beautiful guitars, I like the feel/slowness, the lyrics etc. But it can't even be in the same ballpark as anything on Sticky, nothing form Emotional can.

Unlike Indian Girl, Sticky Finger songs are not just 'my' taste -- it is a staple of the Stones catalog and Stones fans (90%, i'd say, at least) all over recognize it as a brilliant album from start to finish.

Summary:
- Indian Girl song, is a good song in my opinion
- Sticky Fingers, all the songs are great ... that is just a plain fact

I think you quoted the wrong text here, but anyway.
I agree that anything on SF is in a different ballpark than Indian Girl. But since I was saying that "Sister Morphine" was a bit too "sentimental", too "schmaltz", I wanted to be honest in admitting that actually I do like Indian Girl, which is schmaltzy as well. But you're right, apart from their schmaltziness (or not) they are not really comparable. I can even recognize that Sister Morphine is the better song (structure, singing, playing) than Indian Girl, but still, I find Sister Morphine the weakest song on SF and Indian Girl one of the highlights on ER. Which probably might have something to do with SF being a stronger album than ER.
I think I'm starting to ramble. And it's not even midnight.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:01

Comparing SF to ER is like comparing CrossEyed Heart to Exile, there is always going to be someone willing to go there but it doesn't really hold water.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: LeonidP ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:03

Quote
matxil
Quote
LeonidP
Quote
matxil
Quote
Hairball
Quote
Naturalust
Yes there is definitely some perspective involved with You Gotta Move. If it were on a modern Stones record people would be praising it for it's stand out quality.

One of the things about that tune is it is a blast to play, something soulful and liberating about the cadence and melody. It's close to the true essence of a certain form of blues music. I think if the folks who don't like it actually tried singing along they might understand it a bit more...even if they don't sing.

Not so sure about your first point Naturalust. I don't dislike the tune, but will say it's the weak link on the album. I liken it to Back of My Hand (on a modern Stones record) - not really a strong take on the blues imo. While the Fred McDowell and earlier gospel versions are the pure essence of gospel blues, the Stones version is a bit lacking - as has been mentioned Mick's vocals are contrived and insincere sounding.

And really don't quite understand your point stating that people who don't like it would understand it a bit more if they sang it...
That's like saying I should try and sing Emotional Rescue, and even if I can't sing, the process of trying would help me understand it better. I don't think so.

Probaby singing along with ER would also be a lot of fun, even (or especially) when you can't sing.
But with You Gotta Move, it really has this blues-gospel sing-along thing which maybe if you do sing along you sort of get into the groove and feel of it. As such, it's very different from Back On My Hand, which lacks this quality.
I think Mick sings You Gotta Move as best as one can, singing blues convincingly is very difficult, and I like the straightforwardness of the way they played it. It fits well in the album, because it sort of is a reminder of simpleness, purenes, whereas the rest of the album is more "decorated", "flowery". Which is why probably they put it right next after Knocking.
There's a live version somewhere in the 70s which is even better where Keith plays the opening beautifully. But the version on SF is more low-key, and - as I said - that goes very well with the rest of the album.

Not sure what Indian Girl has to do w/ this in any way. I like it for my own personal taste, and can easily see why others might not. To me, beautiful guitars, I like the feel/slowness, the lyrics etc. But it can't even be in the same ballpark as anything on Sticky, nothing form Emotional can.

Unlike Indian Girl, Sticky Finger songs are not just 'my' taste -- it is a staple of the Stones catalog and Stones fans (90%, i'd say, at least) all over recognize it as a brilliant album from start to finish.

Summary:
- Indian Girl song, is a good song in my opinion
- Sticky Fingers, all the songs are great ... that is just a plain fact

I think you quoted the wrong text here, but anyway.
I agree that anything on SF is in a different ballpark than Indian Girl. But since I was saying that "Sister Morphine" was a bit too "sentimental", too "schmaltz", I wanted to be honest in admitting that actually I do like Indian Girl, which is schmaltzy as well. But you're right, apart from their schmaltziness (or not) they are not really comparable. I can even recognize that Sister Morphine is the better song (structure, singing, playing) than Indian Girl, but still, I find Sister Morphine the weakest song on SF and Indian Girl one of the highlights on ER. Which probably might have something to do with SF being a stronger album than ER.
I think I'm starting to ramble. And it's not even midnight.

I did quote the wrong text, good catch.

Not sure I would use 'sentimental' to describe Sister Morphine. To me, it's just a dark tune and the guitar solo eerily fits the mood perfectly! I actually prefer it over Wild Horses (which I love).


Quote
potus43
What drug are you taking? Moonlight Mile is perfect; epic. Dead Flowers is 10+

LOL, some are just posting same comments over & over in different threads, just trying to get a reaction. Best to ignore, I've found.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-12-24 22:06 by LeonidP.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: HMS ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:10

The hauntingly Sister Morphine is a brilliant ghostly ballad with great atmosphere and deep impact and not at all schmaltzy. Streets Of Love is schmaltzy, but Sister Morphine isnt.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: HMS ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:15

Quote
potus43
What drug are you taking? Moonlight Mile is perfect; epic. Dead Flowers is 10+

Drugs would be helpful to get along with Moonlight Mile. Dead Flowers is okay but it lacks the greatness other SF-tracks have, it´s just a average country-flavored tune, nothing special. It would never be my choice for a setlist.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:17

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Swayed1967
Quote
Turner68
Serious question for people who don't like "you gotta move": why?

Because it’s a joke - almost as bad as Jagger’s a cappella version in Gimme Shelter but not as funny. And it’s impossible to take seriously because unlike, say, Love In Vain, Jagger doesn’t sound remotely believable – this is a white man with back shoe polish on his face.

Exactly. It lacks the balls their previous blues covers have in spades.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: HMS ()
Date: December 24, 2015 22:26

You Gotta Move is brilliant and as black as the blackest blues-singer sitting on a rocking chair on the front porch of a Louisiana-shack in 1933. Back Of My Hand is a white man with black shoe polish on his face, but You Gotta Move, no never.

Re: ALBUM TALK: Sticky Fingers
Posted by: whitem8 ()
Date: December 25, 2015 00:02

Not sure what "back" shoe polish is. I mean, do they have to sound like their black to make it authentic? What is authentic when you have five white British lads playing homage to their blues heroes. Its a great song, but not one of my favorites on Sticky Finger. I do love the live version from Love YOu Live. Very cool pause in the middle and then some fantastic key board work by Billy.

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