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Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: tomcasagranda ()
Date: November 18, 2012 12:37

It's a continuation from Sticky Fingers - melancholic sounds, tempered with what was heard at the time.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: mtaylor ()
Date: November 18, 2012 13:14

Great CD and some of the songs were played on the 73 tour. I like it very much, one of CD that I play the most - has good rockers, more melodic and experimental ones.

Great version of Angie, Dancing with Mr D, Star Star and Heartbreaker.

Funny quotation from the tour by Mick Jagger (believe it or not):

Indeed, on 18 August, before the 1973 Eurpoe tour began, Jagger had been quoted, "The only thing I don't really enjoy about playing live is having to perform the old numbers, even though that's what a lotta people wanna hear us do."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2012-11-18 16:22 by mtaylor.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: buttons67 ()
Date: November 18, 2012 14:50

ive never got the opinion from many stones fans that the band done nothing after 1972.


they have released around 170 songs(not including cover versions) since 1972, although this includes official outtakes.

this equates to around 17 albums or 1 every 2 years 4 months on average for the last 40 years, with many songs ranging from great to good, to not so good, there is something for everyone to like, the band in any period of their history have always shown their versatility and goats head soup highlights this versatility the band have always had.

its a good album, different to what went before, and what came after.

some good ballads, and excellent rockers, a nice mix to an underrated album.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: tony ()
Date: November 18, 2012 15:35

I consider it one of the big ones! Winter is probably one of my favorite songs, Angie - a classic. Star Star and Silver Train rip it up. Heartbreaker and Dancing are both solid tracks. Coming down again is so powerfully soulful. The other three can grow on you and are worth a listen. What's not to like about this album? It's one you can play through.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: slew ()
Date: November 18, 2012 15:51

I've posted on this before GHS suffers in reputation because of the four albums that preceded it. But it a really good record on its own. It has a weariness to it, the rockers don't rock as hard as what was on EOMS and Sticky Fingers but Heartbreaker, Dancing With Mr. D, Silver Train and Star Star are good just a little different. Coming Down Again is one of my three favorite Keith tunes and Winter, 100 Years Ago, Hide Your Love and Can You the Music are all really good songs. The album is different from the "big four" butg those four albums all have different feels to them as well. GHS does not appear to have the same energy level as the others but it is a different band and Keith was really out of his headby this time. Jagger sounded a little annoyed talking about this period in Crossfire Hurricane. I defend Keith a lot of the time but it must have been a real pain the ass to work with him 1972-1977 the guy was a full blown junkie. Some of but not all of his creativeness was taken away by the heroin weather Keith want to admit it or not. But GHS, IORR and Black and Blue are all very good underated albums. They all offer quite a lot just not as good as before and its hard to keep up with waht they had been doing. But the period of 1973-1983 is very under appreciated by the so called critics. Most bands would give their left nut for a catalog that was that good. We always seem to have to compare everything with something else and don't let things stand on their own. GHS is a great album that I canlisten to quite often.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: mtaylor ()
Date: November 18, 2012 16:18

-



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2012-11-18 16:23 by mtaylor.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: buttons67 ()
Date: November 18, 2012 16:23

ive always felt that stones fans and critics only judge the bands songs as how it appears on an album rather than on its own merit.

if a band creates 6 classic songs and attaches it to 1 album, that would register as 1 classic album, but if all 6 classic songs are attached to 6 mediocre albums the songs tend to get lost and overlooked and i feel the stones suffer from this.

some great songs appear on average albums with too

much filler, and as such that period in the bands history goes unappreciated.

the 1978-83 period is no exception.

they released 41 songs during this period(excluding cover versions) and probably around half of these are extremely good songs.

if these songs had appeared on 2 or 3 albums rather than 4, and the filler was dropped, we would have a couple of classic stones albums more to discuss.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: slew ()
Date: November 18, 2012 16:34

buttons67 - What do you have as filler from those four albums all I have is Lies, Emotional Rescue, No Use In Crying, Black Limousine (I like this but its a by the numbers song), Feel On Baby amd Pretty Beat Up. Some of the other songs are not as good as others but I would not classify them as filler. Girty Work other than One hit and Harlem Shuffle is filler that never should have been released. But as you say even a lousy album can have a grat song. One Hit is Keith's last really great riff aside from some of the Winos stuff which I wish he could have done with the Stones.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: kammpberg ()
Date: November 18, 2012 16:42

My Review of GHS:

Goats Head Soup – 1973 (US #1; UK#1)
Dancing With Mr. D • 100 Years Ago • Coming Down Again • Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) • Angie •
Silver Train • Hide Your Love • Winter • Can You Hear The Music • Star Star (@#$%&)

Stones Fan – *****
Casual Listener - ****

Goats Head Soup is in many ways, the most interesting Stones album. Without a doubt, it is the most underrated album in their canon, even by The Stones themselves. Yet, it is a perfect distillation of Exile On Main Street. Take Exile’s sprawling landscapes and styles and make it more concise and you have Goats Head Soup. If Exile was a triple album, this would slide in perfectly without the slightest dip in quality. Plus this album has something that Exile didn’t, a blockbuster single that was also a tremendous piece of art. Goats Head Soup peaked at #1 on both sides of the pond topping the US chart for 4 weeks. It also included a very cool, yet creepy “Goats Head Soup” poster insert that characterized the music perfectly.

Unlike Sticky Fingers and Exile, which opened with blistering rock tracks, the mysterious vibe of this album starts off with the opening guitar notes. Jagger starts singing about being down at the graveyard and one can picture oneself with him in some Louisiana swamp. Dancing With Mr. D picks up a nice steady groove, with Charlie slightly behind the beat as only had can. The song absolutely oozes with a loose and muddy feel, slightly speeding up as it moves along – something fairly unique with the Stones. Jagger’s vocals are buried in the mix (like Exile), and it works perfectly along with the occasional background howls. One has to struggle to understand the lyrics, and that makes it even more effective. I wish the Stones mixed the vocals like this nowadays. I’ve heard people compare this song to Sympathy For The Devil, but that’s just plain silly. If you want to hear some true Stones’ Jamaican “Voodoo Lounge”, jump right in here. Dancing With Mr. D was only played live on their 1973 tour, but they did use it to promote the album on Don Kirschner’s Rock Concert on US TV.

100 Years Ago opens with a tasteful Billy Preston clavinet introduction and Mick takes us on a journey through the woods the other day. Again the vocals are down and the mix is muddy but it creates a warm encompassing mood. After the intro, the band kicks in with a buoyant upbeat feel. After two versus, Taylor comes in with a wah wah solo but again its buried in the background. Then the song comes to a stop and Jagger starts singing about “lazy bones ain’t got no time to waste away”. This is a downright strange interlude – almost tagged on from another song. It’s brief and the band kicks back in with a truly vicious jam led by keyboards and the wah wah guitar wailing in the background till it fades out.

Coming Down Again is a magnificent ballad led by Keith on vocals and supported by Nicky Hopkins’ beautiful piano and heavy wah wah guitar. Keith’s voice is clear and upfront and absolutely magnificent, with Jagger helping on background vocals perfectly. Keith confesses about slipping his tongue in someone else’s pie, but being hungry it ain’t no crime. After a couple of versus, the song reaches even higher when Hopkin’s piano leads into a phenomenal solo break shared by organ and saxophone. It’s relatively short and segues back into the Coming Down Again verse, but it’s so effective. The Stones have an amazing amount of these phenomenal tracks that should be played, but are long lost, just waiting to be re-discovered.
Another exciting keyboard intro, Charlie’s drums kick in and Jagger sings about a tale of police mistaken identity and the death of a lone junkie in an alleyway. Heady stuff but backed by intoxicating upbeat music highlighted with horn accents, wah wah guitar and an infectious “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo” chorus. This is hit material and a classic in my book. Heartbreaker is still performed in concert on occasion, it’s always a highlight for me. This was the 2nd US single (none for the UK) and it peaked at #15.

Angie comes next. It’s simply amongst the most well crafted ballads the bands ever done. It’s simply perfect. Jagger’s vocals have never been better (even when he tastefully whispers “Angie”), the lyrics are beautiful and the music is magnificent. The strings tastefully weave in and out along with the beautiful guitar fills and licks. Charlie’s high hat accents throughout are also a trademark of the song. The song is shorter and tighter than Wild Horses and consequently became a well deserved #1 US single (only #5 in the UK). Angie is a classic in every way.

Silver Train starts off side two. Compared to the rest of the album, it comes off a bit pedestrian and the muddy mix takes away from what could have been a truly powerful rocker. This time Jagger uses harmonica to highlight the verses to nice effect and slide guitar running throughout. When it’s time to solo, we get a nice slide guitar solo with Charlie fully riding the cymbal. Jagger raises his voice now, howling about the Silver Train and the song picks up considerable speed. But again the muddy mix distracts from its power. I still prefer the Stones version over the better-known Johnny Winter cover and surprisingly the Stones used this on Kirschner’s to promote the album as well.

Mick Jagger starts bopping on piano singing about sometimes being up and sometimes being down. Again the vocals are down in the mix and one gets the feeling of being in a room with The Stones doing a spontaneous jam on this song. A nice guitar solo starts to kick in and Hide Your Love builds in its power. What at first seems like a loose jam starts to coalesce into a fun loose song. Exile has a few of these type of jam songs, and Hide Your Love is just as good as them.

Next comes one of the all-time lost classic Stones tracks, Winter. I can listen to this song anytime, anywhere. It’s one of the all time great Stones ballads and it should be a regular on classic radio. The song starts with un-accompanied strummed electric guitar and Jagger this time sings clear and up in the mix about a cold hard Winter. At the end of the 2nd verse, one can quickly hear someone yell “yeah” deep in the background, and you feel it too. Jagger wishes he were out in California but instead he’ll wrap his coat around you. Nicky Hopkins piano comes in, as do the strings to bring you ever higher, but the electric guitar and slide licks really bring it home. As you think the songs ending, in comes a tasteful electric guitar solo, string highlights come in and you’re truly lifting higher and higher. At 5:30 it’s too long and not crafted enough for a single, but album ballads don’t come any better.

Suddenly we hear some odd middle-eastern sounds, joined by an infectious heavy wah wah guitar lick. Jagger sings over this tribal beat “Can You Hear The Music / Magic” and at the minute mark the song transforms with Jagger singing about “love is a mystery” with a beautiful melody. Throughout we have wonderful backdrops of sound: wah wahs, drums, eastern drones and strange horn sounds. It’s very effective and haunting. The song stops and in starts the great wah wah guitar lick that started it. By now we can feel the music and magic as Jagger goes back into the “love is a mystery” verse. The song does not feel forced at all, it’s very organic and natural – as if were in a great tribal jam with The Stones and some Arabian musicians. Open up and this music will really grab you.

Next up is Star Star (@#$%&), the only “classic sounding Chuck Berryish” Stones tune on the album. It’s a great way to end the album. We all know the controversy regarding the various lyrics (giving head to Steve McQueen etc), and because of that the vocal lyrics are seriously buried in the mix and in some points nearly impossible to decipher. When Virgin remastered the album, they cleaned it up in the mix and you were able to more clearly hear about “keeping pussy’s clean and getting John Wayne before he dies”. The new Universal mix seems to be closer to the original muddy mix. The song is a classic Stones rocker regardless and is still a highlight when they play it (especially with the blow-up penis on the ’75 / ’76 tour).

So there you have Goats Head Soup, the Stones all-time underrated album, even though it was a US #1 for 4 weeks and has Angie, a perfect #1 single. This album literally takes you on a musical journey, ala Exile On Main Street, but in a more concise way. This album has as many highs as Exile and no real lows and is just ripe for discovery for any Stones fan or casual listener who’s willing to let music envelop their senses. This album is in no way a let down from what came before. The Stones have only regularly played Angie, Heartbreaker and @#$%& live. Dancing With Mr. D, 100 Years Ago and Silver Train made in some cases rare live debuts only on the 1973 tour and the others have never been played live. But it’s not because of the quality, they just aren’t really live type songs.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: buttons67 ()
Date: November 18, 2012 17:21

from the 1978-83 period i would regard as filler,

half of emotional rescue, all the way down and feel on baby from undercover, although many other songs are not as good as others, it is still a strong time for the band as far as recording goes.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: bestfour ()
Date: November 18, 2012 18:54

Quote
arthritis
Listen to winter on an icy winter day sometime.
Yes, beautiful track, in fact brilliant album, went to two concerts at the "Empire Pool" London for GHS tour, my God thats a few years ago, BUT still love the album and listen to it lots drinking smiley

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: bestfour ()
Date: November 18, 2012 19:02

Quote
kammpberg
My Review of GHS:

Goats Head Soup – 1973 (US #1; UK#1)
Dancing With Mr. D • 100 Years Ago • Coming Down Again • Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) • Angie •
Silver Train • Hide Your Love • Winter • Can You Hear The Music • Star Star (@#$%&)

Stones Fan – *****
spinning smiley sticking its tongue outCasual Listener - ****

Goats Head Soup is in many ways, the most interesting Stones album. Without a doubt, it is the most underrated album in their canon, even by The Stones themselves. Yet, it is a perfect distillation of Exile On Main Street. Take Exile’s sprawling landscapes and styles and make it more concise and you have Goats Head Soup. If Exile was a triple album, this would slide in perfectly without the slightest dip in quality. Plus this album has something that Exile didn’t, a blockbuster single that was also a tremendous piece of art. Goats Head Soup peaked at #1 on both sides of the pond topping the US chart for 4 weeks. It also included a very cool, yet creepy “Goats Head Soup” poster insert that characterized the music perfectly.

Unlike Sticky Fingers and Exile, which opened with blistering rock tracks, the mysterious vibe of this album starts off with the opening guitar notes. Jagger starts singing about being down at the graveyard and one can picture oneself with him in some Louisiana swamp. Dancing With Mr. D picks up a nice steady groove, with Charlie slightly behind the beat as only had can. The song absolutely oozes with a loose and muddy feel, slightly speeding up as it moves along – something fairly unique with the Stones. Jagger’s vocals are buried in the mix (like Exile), and it works perfectly along with the occasional background howls. One has to struggle to understand the lyrics, and that makes it even more effective. I wish the Stones mixed the vocals like this nowadays. I’ve heard people compare this song to Sympathy For The Devil, but that’s just plain silly. If you want to hear some true Stones’ Jamaican “Voodoo Lounge”, jump right in here. Dancing With Mr. D was only played live on their 1973 tour, but they did use it to promote the album on Don Kirschner’s Rock Concert on US TV.

100 Years Ago opens with a tasteful Billy Preston clavinet introduction and Mick takes us on a journey through the woods the other day. Again the vocals are down and the mix is muddy but it creates a warm encompassing mood. After the intro, the band kicks in with a buoyant upbeat feel. After two versus, Taylor comes in with a wah wah solo but again its buried in the background. Then the song comes to a stop and Jagger starts singing about “lazy bones ain’t got no time to waste away”. This is a downright strange interlude – almost tagged on from another song. It’s brief and the band kicks back in with a truly vicious jam led by keyboards and the wah wah guitar wailing in the background till it fades out.

Coming Down Again is a magnificent ballad led by Keith on vocals and supported by Nicky Hopkins’ beautiful piano and heavy wah wah guitar. Keith’s voice is clear and upfront and absolutely magnificent, with Jagger helping on background vocals perfectly. Keith confesses about slipping his tongue in someone else’s pie, but being hungry it ain’t no crime. After a couple of versus, the song reaches even higher when Hopkin’s piano leads into a phenomenal solo break shared by organ and saxophone. It’s relatively short and segues back into the Coming Down Again verse, but it’s so effective. The Stones have an amazing amount of these phenomenal tracks that should be played, but are long lost, just waiting to be re-discovered.
Another exciting keyboard intro, Charlie’s drums kick in and Jagger sings about a tale of police mistaken identity and the death of a lone junkie in an alleyway. Heady stuff but backed by intoxicating upbeat music highlighted with horn accents, wah wah guitar and an infectious “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo” chorus. This is hit material and a classic in my book. Heartbreaker is still performed in concert on occasion, it’s always a highlight for me. This was the 2nd US single (none for the UK) and it peaked at #15.

Angie comes next. It’s simply amongst the most well crafted ballads the bands ever done. It’s simply perfect. Jagger’s vocals have never been better (even when he tastefully whispers “Angie”), the lyrics are beautiful and the music is magnificent. The strings tastefully weave in and out along with the beautiful guitar fills and licks. Charlie’s high hat accents throughout are also a trademark of the song. The song is shorter and tighter than Wild Horses and consequently became a well deserved #1 US single (only #5 in the UK). Angie is a classic in every way.

Silver Train starts off side two. Compared to the rest of the album, it comes off a bit pedestrian and the muddy mix takes away from what could have been a truly powerful rocker. This time Jagger uses harmonica to highlight the verses to nice effect and slide guitar running throughout. When it’s time to solo, we get a nice slide guitar solo with Charlie fully riding the cymbal. Jagger raises his voice now, howling about the Silver Train and the song picks up considerable speed. But again the muddy mix distracts from its power. I still prefer the Stones version over the better-known Johnny Winter cover and surprisingly the Stones used this on Kirschner’s to promote the album as well.

Mick Jagger starts bopping on piano singing about sometimes being up and sometimes being down. Again the vocals are down in the mix and one gets the feeling of being in a room with The Stones doing a spontaneous jam on this song. A nice guitar solo starts to kick in and Hide Your Love builds in its power. What at first seems like a loose jam starts to coalesce into a fun loose song. Exile has a few of these type of jam songs, and Hide Your Love is just as good as them.

Next comes one of the all-time lost classic Stones tracks, Winter. I can listen to this song anytime, anywhere. It’s one of the all time great Stones ballads and it should be a regular on classic radio. The song starts with un-accompanied strummed electric guitar and Jagger this time sings clear and up in the mix about a cold hard Winter. At the end of the 2nd verse, one can quickly hear someone yell “yeah” deep in the background, and you feel it too. Jagger wishes he were out in California but instead he’ll wrap his coat around you. Nicky Hopkins piano comes in, as do the strings to bring you ever higher, but the electric guitar and slide licks really bring it home. As you think the songs ending, in comes a tasteful electric guitar solo, string highlights come in and you’re truly lifting higher and higher. At 5:30 it’s too long and not crafted enough for a single, but album ballads don’t come any better.

Suddenly we hear some odd middle-eastern sounds, joined by an infectious heavy wah wah guitar lick. Jagger sings over this tribal beat “Can You Hear The Music / Magic” and at the minute mark the song transforms with Jagger singing about “love is a mystery” with a beautiful melody. Throughout we have wonderful backdrops of sound: wah wahs, drums, eastern drones and strange horn sounds. It’s very effective and haunting. The song stops and in starts the great wah wah guitar lick that started it. By now we can feel the music and magic as Jagger goes back into the “love is a mystery” verse. The song does not feel forced at all, it’s very organic and natural – as if were in a great tribal jam with The Stones and some Arabian musicians. Open up and this music will really grab you.

Next up is Star Star (@#$%&), the only “classic sounding Chuck Berryish” Stones tune on the album. It’s a great way to end the album. We all know the controversy regarding the various lyrics (giving head to Steve McQueen etc), and because of that the vocal lyrics are seriously buried in the mix and in some points nearly impossible to decipher. When Virgin remastered the album, they cleaned it up in the mix and you were able to more clearly hear about “keeping pussy’s clean and getting John Wayne before he dies”. The new Universal mix seems to be closer to the original muddy mix. The song is a classic Stones rocker regardless and is still a highlight when they play it (especially with the blow-up penis on the ’75 / ’76 tour).

So there you have Goats Head Soup, the Stones all-time underrated album, even though it was a US #1 for 4 weeks and has Angie, a perfect #1 single. This album literally takes you on a musical journey, ala Exile On Main Street, but in a more concise way. This album has as many highs as Exile and no real lows and is just ripe for discovery for any Stones fan or casual listener who’s willing to let music envelop their senses. This album is in no way a let down from what came before. The Stones have only regularly played Angie, Heartbreaker and @#$%& live. Dancing With Mr. D, 100 Years Ago and Silver Train made in some cases rare live debuts only on the 1973 tour and the others have never been played live. But it’s not because of the quality, they just aren’t really live type songs.

WOW, THATS SOME REVIEW, BRILLIANT, I'm going to listen to it right now smileys with beer

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Cineplexed ()
Date: November 18, 2012 19:12

This album got killed by coming out after Exile. I remember hating it at the time because I wanted another Exile. But over time I've come to feel it is not only one of their best albums, it also contains some of my favorite songs (Hide Your Love, 100 years, Angie, @#$%&, Heartbreaker...to name a few).

I think the songwriting is much better on GHS than on more lauded albums like Some Girls and Tattoo You.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: backstreetboy1 ()
Date: November 18, 2012 19:27

sorry u dont get it.great lp,winter is my favorite.star star,dancing w mr d,etc

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 71Tele ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:05

Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Max'sKansasCity ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:08

Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 71Tele ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:28

Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: sweetcharmedlife ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:41

Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
No Winter has never been played live. As far as I know never even rehearsed. Possibly the number 1 previously unplayed song wanted to be heard live by Stones fans. At least by this one anyway.hot smiley............And yes Mick Taylor would almost certainly have to play on it.

"It's just some friends of mine and they're busting down the door"

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: lunar!!! ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:47

Quote
matsumoto33
Quote
lunar!!!
LOVE IT LOVE IT LOVE IT!!!!!!!.....sorry for shouting...

But why? why? why?

for the same reason some people love 'Hurricane'....because,because,because!!..hahhaha..just has a great lazy island feel to it, some nice guitar work, and a general worn out-weariness to it that reflects what the band was going thru at the time--it's very 1973...

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 71Tele ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:50

This angle isn't discussed much, but there was a nice "sub genre" in the Stones for a few years of Jagger/Taylor collaborations. Winter is one, along with Moonlight Mile and Til The Next Goodbye. I don't necessarily mean songwriting per se, but the two of them were definitely the main band members crafting these songs in the studio, with some interesting results. Time Waits For No One is another one.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Max'sKansasCity ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:53

Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2012-11-18 21:54 by Max'sKansasCity.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 71Tele ()
Date: November 18, 2012 21:56

Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today

No, sounds pretty good from Oslo.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Max'sKansasCity ()
Date: November 18, 2012 22:00

Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today

No, sounds pretty good from Oslo.

How cold is it Oslo today, Jahnny? yony? yan? Jan? whomever winking smiley

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: bam ()
Date: November 18, 2012 22:11

I was really disappointed with this album when I came out, and it hasn't grown on me. I think the main reason that I don't love this album is not that it didn't measure up to the albums before it, so much as it was the first time the Stones started to repeat themselves, instead of reaching out for something new,

At the time, that hit me with Dancing with Mr. D. While it had a good groove, it was thematically close to SFTD, and it made me feel like the Stones had nothing (or much less) new and original to say.

Part of why I hate GHS is because I've always hated Angie. I thought it could have been written and performed by Barry Manilow. And that colored the rest of the album for me.

The other reason I reacted poorly to this album was it was released at the height of Mick's glam phase. Mick was trying to keep up with the latest fad, and I didn't like that new image for the Stones.

I love some of the songs on the album. Agree that Coming Down Again is great. I'm a fan of Hearbreaker and Star Star. I like Silver Train. But as a whole, I still have the same kind of negative reaction to this I had 40 years ago.

Just my opinion. But I can't join the lovefest for this one.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: sweetcharmedlife ()
Date: November 18, 2012 22:12

Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today

No, sounds pretty good from Oslo.

How cold is it Oslo today, Jahnny? yony? yan? Jan? whomever winking smiley
Jele?spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

"It's just some friends of mine and they're busting down the door"

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: stonemason ()
Date: November 18, 2012 22:33

Yes, I am in total agreement. I personally include this album right in there with their so called "big albums." It does have a sad feel to much of it but there is also a melancholy longing or beauty to it - a good example is when Mick Taylor comes in on Winter and just takes you soaring with the emotion he puts into his playing. Coming Down again is still my favorite Keith tune. The clarinet in the song is fantastic. I am also one of those fans who thinks that this is a vastly underated album.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: November 18, 2012 22:46

I think it's very reflective of them burning out. I think Coming Down Again is Keith expressing his feelings about Brian and Anita. (Which I think he still wrestles with.) Dancing With Mr. D is much better live, or at least it is on the Brussels boots. Angie is simply a world wide smash and probably one of their most beloved songs. It just sounds like everything has caught up to them. I think the Guy Pealleart cover from It's Only Rock and Roll would have been more appropriate.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: 71Tele ()
Date: November 18, 2012 23:00

Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today

No, sounds pretty good from Oslo.

How cold is it Oslo today, Jahnny? yony? yan? Jan? whomever winking smiley

Not bad, actually. And the sun was out all day (if you count about six hours as a "day").

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Max'sKansasCity ()
Date: November 18, 2012 23:03

Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Quote
Max'sKansasCity
Quote
71Tele
Have they ever attempted "Winter" live? I don't think so. How about we rally for that one next tour? Maybe a certain guitarist would be involved.
I think I only like Winter in the summer....

The idea is nice, when it is 95 degrees) but the reality is sucking. brrrrrrrr

How cold is it, Johnny?

Its so cold that.....

Politicians have their hands in their own pockets

Nieghbors had to chop up their piano for firewood, it only gave two cords.

People listening to Rush Limbaugh, that desperate for hot air

I climbed in the fridge to warm up.



In other words, I got nuthin today

No, sounds pretty good from Oslo.

How cold is it Oslo today, Jahnny? yony? yan? Jan? whomever winking smiley

Not bad, actually. And the sun was out all day (if you count about six hours as a "day").

Myabe if I was a vampire.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2012-11-18 23:04 by Max'sKansasCity.

Re: Goat's Head Soup
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: November 18, 2012 23:08

This album is great and my first taste of the Stones. The first cut is the deepest and I still love it after backtracking to the 4 previous great records with a passion.

The songwriting was superb but maybe the execution was a bit flawed. Probably due to the atmosphere down in Jamacia where the basic tracks were cut. Too much ganja and herion are bound to take their toll on any record. Mick even mentions it in Crossfire Hurricane. I mean when the producer and engineer are also strung out I'm sure the music took somewhat of a back seat to getting off.

It seems this was the first record where Keith, Jimmy Miller and Andy Johns weren't completely functioning. that's why it is not up to the standards of the previous few records, imho. peace

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