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ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: September 27, 2021 16:06

I'm in search of "Truth" and "Ola" to download (with bonus tracks if possible).


The Jeff Beck Group - Rod, Ron, Micky and Jeff

The Jeff Beck Group was a British rock band formed in London in January 1967 by former Yardbirds guitarist Jeff Beck. Their innovative approach to heavy-sounding blues, rhythm and blues and rock was a major influence on popular music.

The first Jeff Beck Group formed in London in early 1967 and included guitarist Jeff Beck, vocalist Rod Stewart, and rhythm guitarist Ronnie Wood, with bass players and drummers changing regularly. In May 1969, the Jeff Beck Group embarked on their fourth U.S tour, this time with Hopkins as a full-fledged member.

The Jeff Beck Group [en.wikipedia.org]


Jeff Beck Group's "Truth" and "Ola" albums were released separately and together. They fit together well with some great classic Blues tracks.


"Truth is the debut studio album by English guitarist
t Jeff Beck, released in 1968. It introduced the talents of his backing band the Jeff Beck Group, specifically Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood, to a larger audience."

More details on wiki....


Did you know that Ola's re-release in 2004 has bonus tracks? Did you know
"Truth" had a re-release in 2006 with 8 bonus tracks?

Jeff Beck Group "Ola" [en.wikipedia.org]

Jeff Beck – guitars, backing vocals on "Throw Down a Line"
Rod Stewart – lead vocals
Nicky Hopkins – piano and organ
Ronnie Wood – bass guitar
Tony Newman – drums

Jeff Beck Group "Truth" [en.wikipedia.org])

Jeff Beck – electric guitars, acoustic guitar on "Greensleeves"; pedal steel guitar on "Shapes of Things"; bass guitar on "Ol' Man River"; lead vocals
on "Tallyman" and "Hi Ho Silver Lining", co-lead vocals on "Let Me Love You"
Rod Stewart – lead vocals, backing vocals on "Hi Ho Silver Lining", possible backing vocal on "Tallyman"[citation needed]
Ronnie Wood – bass guitar
Micky Waller – drums
Additional credited personnel

John Paul Jones – bass guitar on "Hi Ho Silver Lining" and "Beck's Bolero"; Hammond organ on "Ol' Man River" and "You Shook Me"; arrangements on "Hi Ho Silver Lining"
Nicky Hopkins – piano on "Morning Dew", "You Shook Me", "Beck's Bolero" and "Blues Deluxe"
"You Know Who" (Keith Moon) – drums on "Beck's Bolero"; timpani on "Ol' Man River"




Rod Stewart and Nicky Hopkins

+++++++++++


OCTOBER 19, 2012

Rod Stewart: The Jeff Beck Group Could Have Played Woodstock
In new memoir, the singer remembers his first U.S. tour with the Jeff Beck Group in 1968

By ROLLING STONE


Rod Stewart‘s new memoir Rod: The Autobiography (Crown, out October 23rd) traces the singer’s life from his childhood in post-war London through the rise of The Faces and his own solo career through his many marriages, divorces, children and grandchildren. In this exclusive excerpt, Stewart writes about his stint in the short-lived but highly influential Jeff Beck Group and their first tour of America, in 1968 – and his friendship with Jeff Beck Group bassist Ron Wood, who would go on to play guitar in The Faces.

No one ever forgets their first view of Manhattan, rising into the sky ahead of them, nor their first drive up its concrete canyons. Woody and I were in ecstasy – possibly even silenced momentarily, gawping at the scale of it all. In terms of architectural grandeur, it didn’t have much in common with Orpington. We had been planning all along that, as soon as we had checked into the hotel, which was at around lunchtime, we would make a pilgrimage to the Apollo Theater in Harlem: the home of the musicians we had worshipped for so long from so far away. We were pretty naïve about it. We didn’t even think it might be a dangerous place for a couple of unaccompanied white boys to go. One taxi driver ran his eye up and down us, in our Swinging London finery, with our combed-up hair and highly visible jet lag, and flatly refused to take us. But another drove us up there, and probably because of the way we looked – because we were unmistakably musicians or performers of some kind – nobody was bothered about us. In fact, we felt welcome. We walked under the marquee that spread the width of the pavement, paid entrance fees, and saw an afternoon session, with Martha and the Vandellas on the top of the bill, after which we left in a state of enchantment.

If you had told me, in our returning taxicab that afternoon, that one day I would be back at the Apollo to sing on a bill that included Wilson Pickett, the Four Tops, Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson, and, indeed, Martha Reeves, I would have laughed so hard I would have paid the fare. Yet it came to pass – in 1985, for the “Motown Returns to the Apollo” show, where I took the opportunity to kneel in adulation at the feet of James Brown. I was a very proud man that night, as I am sure you will understand.

The day after my and Woody’s adventure on 125th Street, we played our opening show: the first of a four-night stint at the Fillmore East, on Second Avenue in the East Village. The promoter Bill Graham had recently converted this old theater into a 2,700-capacity rock venue, an East Coast counterpart to the Fillmore that he was already running in San Francisco. We were due to go on after a band called Buzzy Linhart’s Seventh Sons. Backstage, Jeff began to explain an idea he’d had about joining the first two numbers together to give the show a more theatrical opening, but I wasn’t really listening to him because my attention had been drawn by an awful noise seeping through the dressing-room wall, as if cattle were being horribly tortured in an adjacent room. They weren’t, though. It was the sound of Buzzy Linhart and every single one of his Seventh Sons getting the mother and father of all boo-offs from 2,700 unimpressed New Yorkers.

This didn’t do much to settle my nerves, which were already badly jangled by a number of factors, including the size of the venue (so much larger than the 200- to 800-capacity clubs we had been playing in Britain) and the worrying thought that I was about to perform, for the first time, in a country in which people were allowed to own guns.

Most worrying of all, though, was the that, within the context of the whole “grungy Motown rock” idea, I was, essentially, a white guy trying to sing like a black guy, and I was fairly sure, this being America, and specifically the Lower East Side of New York, that when the curtain went back the audience would be revealed to contain some genuine black guys who might have some quite strong opinions about that kind of thing. (I was wrong on this count: the audience was almost completely made up of white, long-haired hippies.)

So I sang the first lines of “I Ain’t Superstitious” from a semi-crouching position behind the amps at the back of the stage. I wasn’t entirely hiding, you understand. I was just trying to look like I was busy doing something important and technical: changing a fuse, maybe, or fixing a plug. When the first verse passed off without (a) a stage invasion by aggrieved blues purists, wanting their money and their music back, and (b) noticeable gunfire, I found the courage to stand up and come forward into the lights.

Whereupon we proceeded to blow the place apart. Absolutely destroyed it. Hammered them with colossal versions of “Rock Me, Baby” and “You Shook Me.” The theater went nuts. I looked across the stalls at one point and it was a churning sea of tossed hair, as far as the eye could see. I had never witnessed a reaction like it. I had certainly never been part of a band that generated a reaction like it. Encore after encore.

The American girls that I met on those first trips to America – the ones who came to the shows and then hung about with us backstage afterwards – struck me as more friendly, more open, and more up for a laugh than the girls in England, but not necessarily more promiscuous. They needed to be charmed and persuaded, though an English accent seemed to help. The problem was, the budgets for those Beck tours often only allowed for a twin room for Ronnie and me, which could have been restrictive, from the point of view of entertaining female company. But we were ingenious enough not to let it become so. We created a modicum of privacy for each other by building a wall between the two beds out suitcases and any conveniently loose hotel furniture, such as dressing tables, chairs, or wardrobes, converting the room into an ad hoc suite, or subdivided sex parlor.

But then, in the dark, behind the screen, going about our fumbly business, the schoolboy gene would kick in and Woody would make a ridiculous noise, and I would make an even more ridiculous noise, and then an escalating “ridiculous noise” war would break out, culminating, frequently, in one or the other of us knocking down the barrier and burying the adjacent couple in a mound of luggage and chair legs. The extent to which our companions for the night found this as amusing as we did tended, I suppose, to vary. Frankly, in retrospect, to be a groupie attached to me or Woody on those nights, you would have needed the patience of a saint. Very often we got more pleasure out of each other than we did out of the girls.

Another game we liked to organize was entitled “Wood & Stewart Operations,” for the purposes of which our shared room became a surgery and we became doctors, complete with toy stethoscopes and white gowns, ready to offer girls an examination and possibly even an operation. Many girls ran a mile in the other direction at this suggestion. Many, however, didn’t.

In 1969, with things getting ever more fractious and beginning to spiral downwards, Jeff kicked Woody out of the band because he felt he was complaining too much, which in turn had the effect of stretching my patience with the whole project. There was no fun in it without Woody. That said, a guy called Doug Blake came in to play bass, and had what was, in retrospect, an important influence on me. Not only did Blake take to the stage, no matter how hot it was, in a frock coat and a pair of fingerless mittens, he also had a trick of flipping his bass guitar in the air and catching it again, which would in turn prompt me, slightly competitively (not wanting to be upstaged by the bassist, of all people), to throw my microphone into the air and catch it – a tiny lob the first few times, and then higher and higher as confidence grew. It was the beginning of a whole new phase for my stage act: the opening of a whole new repertoire of movements.

Our last American tour was a short jaunt up the East Coast intk the summer of 1969, taking in the Fillmore East, where it had all begun, Maryland, and the Newport Jazz Festival, with the intention to end the trip at some outdoor event or other in upstate New York in August. On the eve of that last show the band was billeted in a hotel at JFK Airport, the plan being to hop over to the event and back and fly out to London on the same night. But then the call came through. The gig wouldn’t be happening. Jeff had already flown out on the 5:30 flight that afternoon. Apparently he had got wind from somewhere of a rumor, which turned out to be false, that his missus was having an affair with the gardener, so he was quite keen to go home.

The name of that festival we didn’t play: Woodstock. Ah, well. Seen one outdoor festival, you’ve seen them all.

Adapted from ROD: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY Copyright © 2012 by Rod Stewart.

In This Article: Jeff Beck, memoirs, Ron Wood, The Faces, The Jeff Beck Group

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: September 27, 2021 16:22


Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: September 27, 2021 16:42


Jeff Beck Group in 1969 with Nicky Hopkins






Ron Wood Gets Fired from The Jeff Beck Group BUT Returns
[wildwestrocks.com]

Go West Young Man
BY WILDWESTROCKS · JANUARY 20, 2021

The first show in the US was at the Filmore East in New York. They were warming up for the Grateful Dead. That was June 14, 1968. It was a good night, a stellar night really, though legend has it that Rod Stewart was just not ready for American audiences. It took a moment for him to get his bearings. For the first song or two he was hiding behind the amps. Legend has it he discovered some brandy, and with that he did find his way to the stage proper.

The Poster announcing the Jeff Beck Group's first show at the Fillmore East.
Jeff Beck Group’s first show at the Fillmore East.
Fresh from London, where Rod and the band were playing primarily smaller venues, and now in the middle of NYC and taking the stage at the Fillmore East. It might have even been the case that it was at this first show that he encountered Janis Joplin backstage, giving an impromptu show for the stagehands and whoever else was there. Imagine that, just arriving in NYC from the UK. Your first time in NYC. Encountering, the city, the people, the intensity of Manhattan. All of that. It was a different world, and he was taken aback for a moment.

Stewart found his voice, and the band was quickly firing on all cylinders that night. That performance got them signed with Epic, which in turn led to the release of Truth in the US, happening as the tour ended in August. It was not just the show. The show rather initiated a chain of events that led to that record release.


Ron Wood, Micky Waller and Jeff Beck
I don’t believe there is an audio recording of this first gig, but it was still documented. In the audience was Robert Shelton, a writer for the New York Times. It was his review that came out the following day that basically introduced the Jeff Beck Group to America. His eight-paragraph review of the show focused on the Jeff Beck Group, saying little regarding the headliner, the Grateful Dead, and likewise the Seventh Sons, who started the evening.


The New York Times article that got Jeff Beck his record deal and introduced his band to a US audience.
Regarding Beck and company, Shelton quickly points out in his review that “He (Beck) and his band deal in the blues mainly, but with an urgency and sweep that is quite hard to resist.” The next paragraph goes on “The group’s principal format is the interaction of Mr. Beck’s wild and visionary guitar against the hoarse and insistent shouting of Rod Stewart, with gutsy backing on drums and bass.”

Peter Grant took those words from the New York Times review and telegraphed them to the executives of Epic Records. So this first show in NYC started a chain of events, a mouse trap if you will, that led to Truth. A mouse trap that entailed Peter Grant, his telegram, the New York Times review of the show by Robert Shelton, and finally this dandy of a first show that got the Jeff Beck Group that record deal, and with that the release of Truth.

The band stayed in New York for several weeks. They did a festival in Staten Island, and a week-long residency at the Scene Club in Manhattan. Apparently, Hendrix would join in at the tail end of several nights. Likewise, Clapton also appeared at one of those shows. Beck, Hendrix and Clapton in a small venue in the midst of Manhattan in the summer of 1968. Nice, but sadly, it appears that no bootlegs came out of that residency either.


Jimi Hendrix at one of those shows at the Scene Club, playing Jeff Becks Les Paul. Ronnie Wood can be seen behind him beside the amps.
It was a six-week tour of the US. Perhaps they did add some shows. It did introduce the band to the country. Some might have known who Jeff Beck was, but they certainly did not know the Jeff Beck Band. The New York Times article changed that or at least opened the door to them. What that article pointed to was what the American audience began to discover in those six weeks. Those who remembered Jeff Beck from the Yardbirds now began to see a progression. Jeff was coming into his own, like Clapton who was now in the midst of Cream, and of course Hendrix. Again, Cream’s Disraeli Gears and Hendrix’s Are You Experienced had been released in late 1967 and this tour was happening in June of 1968. So it was the midst of that that the Jeff Beck Group happened.


Jeff Beck Group Promotional Poster for the Fillmore West in 1968. Notice the American flag, the handgun and floral pattered shirt.
Once leaving New York, they hit Philadelphia, Detroit, Boston, and then onto Chicago. Ultimately, they found their way to the west coast. They hit the Fillmore West for six shows and ended the tour at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. It was night and day between their experience in the UK and the US.

It was only a year ago that the Small Faces it is speculated pulled the plug on that first show. In hindsight, considering their unpreparedness, the Small Faces might have done the Jeff Beck Group a favor. And now in the US they supported the likes of the Moby Grape, the Grateful Dead, and Sly and the Family Stone. Things had evolved.


Sly and the Family Stone – A band that the Jeff Beck Group toured with and that Jeff Beck apparently dug while touring with them.
It was largely due to the instincts of Peter Grant, putting this US tour together, and getting them in the studio for those few days, even without a label supporting the project. That and Robert Shelton’s review. It all led to a successful tour, an album that would sell, and just their introduction to a US audience.

The Brits, though respectful of Beck, did not latch onto Truth when it was released there in the fall of 1968. So, unlike the US where they were playing venues such as Graham’s Fillmores, East and West, and the like, they were still in the smaller clubs. I suspect that the British audience were still just unsure. Was Jeff Beck a Pop Star or a Rocker? His latest 45 in the record shops in London, released in early 68, framed the question. Was his thing “Love is Blue” or was his sound more the B Side on that record – “I’ve Been Drinking”? The problem there was that the B side on that single was more R&B, a nod to Rod Stewart.

Americans never had to ponder such questions. They had never been exposed to the pop nor even the R&B explorations of Jeff Beck. Both Jeff and Peter Grant made sure of that. Jeff in his abrupt departure from that last Yardbirds tour with Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars, and Peter Grant in this tour and record deal. Just look at those two tours. Dick Clark in late 66 featured acts such as Gary Lewis & the Playboys and Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs. And now in the summer of 68, again the Jeff Beck Group were supporting the likes of the Grateful Dead and Sly and the Family Stone. It was two different worlds.

In mid to late 1968 life was good for Jeff Beck and likewise the band. They headed back to America in October for a second swing across the US. Further introducing them to an American audience and selling more copies of Truth. That said, there were some challenges. The biggest of those coming from a close friend and ally. Led Zeppelin, several months after Truth’s release in early January of 1969, released their self-titled first album.

As mentioned earlier, both bands had offered up versions of You Shook Me. Jeff and company were no doubt surprised by Zeppelin’s version. Neither seemed to be cognizant of the other’s version even though they both were working on respective albums in London at about the same time. That song was only one example of things that Beck and company had explored, and Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin just rushed in and. . . Raped. I exaggerate perhaps. Jimmy Page, with Led Zeppelin, revealed much that Jeff Beck and others had only hinted at.

The rivalry and tension that Beck and Page had when playing together in the Yardbirds no doubt reared its head again here. They were friends and rivals. And both were very much of the same scene. In both the Yardbirds, and now, Page had the luxury to see the trail blazed by Beck. On that trail, however, Page no doubt brought with him his own set of skills and tools. A friendship and rivalry, a head scratcher at times and now a challenge professionally for Jeff Beck in late 1968 and into 1969.

It was not only that Zeppelin was perhaps stealing the thunder. Certainly they did get the spotlight. And then there was their record deal. What Grant had done for the Jeff Beck Group, getting them signed with Epic, he did one better for Zeppelin with Atlantic. This time it was not a telegram quoting a New York Times review but old fashion demos that got him the deal, and it was quite the deal. And this was not just happening in the US. Zeppelin was a phenomenon in both the UK and the US.

Page had not had to deal with Micky Most and the flirtation with pop. Rather, after Beck’s departure from the Yardbirds in 66, Page continued on with them. You can find early versions of Dazed and Confused performed by the Yardbirds proper, with Keith Relf singing. Only after Relf and the other Yardbirds bailed in 68, did Page bring in Plant, Jones and Bonham, which were originally to be the New Yardbirds. It was only after he was told by his old bandmates to cease and desist that the name Led Zeppelin was embraced.


The Yardbirds doing Dazed and Confused in 1967.
And of course, the name “Led Zeppelin” is courtesy of Keith Moon. Legend has it that in the course of that session which resulted in “Beck’s Bolero”, back in 1966 and featuring Beck, Page, Moon, John Paul Jones, and others, that Moon commented that if this crew started a band it would go down like a lead balloon. That comment apparently had left an impression on Jimmy Page.

What started as joke in that session in 66 would basically define a generation. Pete Townsend had talked of his generation. Robert Plant and Led Zeppelin in the opening lines of “Good Time Bad Times” now spoke of what it means to become a man in that generation. This is followed by “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” and “You Shook Me”. And that first side of the album ends with “Dazed and Confused”, which talks not of drugs but again the hypnotic trance of a women. It is a drug and it is a theme that Led Zeppelin thoroughly exploits in their first albums.


Led Zeppelin 1 album cover.
That first and second Zeppelin album so speaks to the young men of that generation, ideally listening through their hi-fis and headphones. In these albums, they were given generous shots of blues, rock, the electric guitar, amplification, and sexual angst. All things that Jeff Beck and Rod Stewart had likewise started to caress and explore. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, however, distilled that brew and brought it to a climax.

Witnessing all of that, and being a part of all of that, did have its consequences for Jeff Beck and those in the Jeff Beck Group, band members and management. There were no more Micky Most singles. Those were done. With the success of Truth and the recent tour of the states that project was pretty much already done. And now with Zeppelin, their music, their record deal, and simply their success, there was absolutely no reason to consider projects such as “Love is Blue”.

More importantly for Jeff Beck and the rest of his band I suspect is the demise of R&B from their sets. Songs such as Marvin Gaye’s “Can I Get A Witness”, the Four Tops’ “Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever”, or the Temptations’ “(I know) I’m Losing You” were basically I suspect off the set list. The tune “I’ve Been Drinking”, the B Side of “Love is Blue”, which is a nod to both R&B and Rod Stewart’s voice, I am guessing rarely made it onto the set list. It did not make it onto “Truth”. The direction now going into 1969 was bluesier, harder, and heavier.

Jeff Beck Group circa 1968 - from left to right - Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Micky Waller, Jeff Beck,
Jeff Beck Group circa 1968 – from left to right – Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Tony Newman, Jeff Beck. And honestly, I cannot tell Micky Waller from Tony Newman, but the source of the photo claimed to be from 1969.
That in turn basically led to the sacking of Micky Waller, who was replaced with Tony Newman. Why? Largely because he was not John Bonham. He was not heavy enough. Tony Newman did bring with him a heavier louder style, which had echoes of John Bonham. Likewise, he brought with him a jazz feel, with nod to players such as Buddy Rich. That mix actually worked for Beck, who though he was a rocker, had a solid respect for jazz. Buddy Rich was simply respected, but Beck no doubt was aware of jazz, as he was R&B.

Regarding personnel, not only did Jeff Beck lose Waller, but for a brief moment, he lost Ron Wood. It was actually Peter Grant who fired Wood. Ultimately, though Wood returned several days later as another US Tour was beginning and his replacement just did not work out. It appears that Ron Wood could, at least at that moment be bought off. I am sure he was more than a little disturbed that he was fired in the first place, but regardless, he did return, and I hope got something for the hassle.

So, there was some chaos regarding personnel in the Jeff Beck Group in early 69. As mentioned earlier, there was a certain tension between Beck and Rod Stewart and Ron Wood. The two, Ron and Rod, only became closer in the year and a half they had played and toured together in the band. And now they were two twenty-something Englishmen wandering vast regions of the US with often spare time on their hands in a band that was kind of hot.

Again, they, Ron and Rod and I imagine all of the band really, were here dipping their toes in the waters that soon enough Led Zeppelin and they themselves would dive into wholeheartedly in the seventies. It was after all rock ‘n’ roll, but the relationship between sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll was just starting to be discovered. And this equation could not really be explored until there was an infusion of cash. Without cash, excess cannot happen. And it is in the seventies that rock and popular music in general had a golden age and artists and labels profited handsomely. In 1969, however, the key ingredient was not there.

In late 1968 and into early 1969 Ron Wood and Rod Stewart were still basically two hired hands, without even formal contracts with Jeff Beck and his management.

And the tensions between Jeff Beck and Rod and Ronnie would only intensify as 1969 progressed. Jeff just continued to not appreciate the schoolboy pranks, the immaturity of the two. And now he was on the road with them much of year, wandering through the United States. He was not a chaperone, and yet he felt it was perhaps required. More importantly perhaps is that they just were not able to help him on a bigger project.

They were not Robert Plant and John Paul Jones. Nor for that matter was he Jimmy Page. Nor did he really want that. That can be seen even in the midst all this and certainly later in his career that becomes even more than obvious.

You can imagine, however, the gravitational pull of Led Zeppelin on Beck and his band. The pull of the music, the pull of its sound – the production values of Zeppelin’s first two albums, the onstage presence of Zeppelin. The pull of the audience. In short, what Jeff was thinking regarding Ronny Wood and Rod Stewart, was very much tied to in so many ways to what he was thinking of Robert Plant and John Paul Jones respectively and more importantly where and what he wanted to do. The presence of Led Zeppelin did effect the equation. It factored into what Jeff Beck did in 1969.

Add to this that Jeff Beck did largely lose a manager. And this was truly due to the ‘gravitational pull’ of Led Zeppelin and it was practical problem. Peter Grant was the man who had gotten Jeff Beck to America. He was the man who got him making rock music and had basically got him rolling. Grant, however, was also Jimmy Page’s and Led Zeppelin’s manager. He would go on to contribute significantly to the story of Led Zeppelin.

With that, with the success of Led Zeppelin, however, more and more of Grant’s time was consumed by that project. He had been managing both Jeff and Jimmy. Zeppelin’s success, however, just took all by storm, including Grant. I am sure that success simply overwhelmed him regarding the options he now had with such an act. Again, what Grant had gotten for Beck with Epic was good, but what he gotten for Page and Zeppelin with Atlantic was amazing. And Jeff was left with Micky Most, who had just started to grasp that rock was the new thing but was really unable to contribute to such a project.

With Grant focused upon Zeppelin, the question became – who was managing the Jeff Beck Group and more importantly, who was handling the money? Jeff Beck was not. Peter Grant was not. Mickie Most it seems was not. And money is important, especially when you consider the band’s success in the States, the venues it was playing, and the success of Truth. Then add to this the sacking of Waller, the hiring of Tony Newman, and the attempted sacking of Ron Wood. Each no doubt raising the issue of compensation – what are you paying?

So, people coming and going, no steady manager or management, and a bit of success in the US. Someone must have been making money, but it was not the band. Add to this the fact that Jeff just did not stay with the band while on tour. Who knows where he was staying? Not with the band, which just breeds suspicion and distrust. And lastly, two years in, and now with some success, but still, no one had thought to pursue a contract with Rod Stewart. There were some issues here which a proper manager should have been addressing.


Nicky Hopkins at the Boston Tea Party in Boston MA in October 1968 with the Jeff Beck Group.


Add to all of this that Nicky Hopkins, the pianist heard on Truth, and likewise heard in that 1966 session resulting in Beck’s Bolero, began touring with the group on their second tour of the States in the fall of 68. He continued on with them into 1969. How much was he getting paid? With success comes new challenges, new and intensified tensions. And the solution? Back to America for now a third tour of the states!


Jeff Beck in the Grand Ballroom in Detroit MI in November 1968.
The Jeff Beck Group, with the line up now featuring Tony Newman on drums and Nicky Hopkins on piano and of course Ron Wood on Bass and Rod Stewart on vocals, does exactly that – returns to the states for a third tour. They begin this third tour of the states, but Jeff Beck approximately midway through collapses on stage. He is exhausted it seems, physically, and emotionally.

It appears the succession of tours and recording had caught up with him. It is not the first time. Twice he had bailed on Yardbird tours. Granted one of those was Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars. Regardless this was the third time he had bailed on a US tour in the past four years. Now, however, it was his band, his project, the Jeff Beck Group, that was cancelling shows, something I am sure he was cognizant of.


Jeff Beck and Nicky Hopkins at the Boston Tea Party in 1969
The band retreated back to London, cancelling the rest of the tour. And as they now have some time on their hands. They decide to record their sophomore effort. “Beck-Ola”, the band’s second album, was recorded in April of 1969, and released in June of that same year. Again, recorded in roughly two weeks’ time. It is roughly 30 minutes in duration. It is short and tasty.

This album starts with Elvis’ “All Shook Up”. Likewise, at the end of side one is Elvis’ “Jailhouse Rock”. In between is “Spanish Boots” and “Girl from Mill Valley”. Two very different songs. Spanish Boots is a rocker. An original with the blues riffs very much front and center, likewise Nicky Hopkins very much present and even a dash of funk. The play of Jeff Beck’s guitar and Rod Stewart’s voice very much there. Ron Wood ends the tune with a very cool lead-bass outro.

“Girl From Mill Valley” goes in a totally different direction. It is primarily just Nicky Hopkins’ piano and organ. You hear a hint of Jeff’s guitar, but little of the rest of the band. No vocals. Just Nicky Hopkins. As I said above, it is followed by Elvis’ Jailhouse Rock. You do hear the keyboards and the bass more on this album. They were there on Truth, but Ron Wood’s bass and Nicky Hopkin’s piano do play a larger role here. Perhaps the result of the new drummer, Tony Newman, a different studio, and now roughly two years plus of playing with each other.

The second side entails three songs. All are original: “Plynth (Water Down the Drain)”, “Hangman’s Knee”, and “Rice Pudding”. Again, all involve or convey a band that has some history. You can hear it in the how they just play off each other. This album is obviously a continuation of Truth in various ways. It continues to be Jeff Beck’s band, and Rod Stewart with his voice is still very much there, but you can tell that the band now had some history. You can hear it in these tracks.

Interestingly, Stewart is in fact not present on two tunes, “Girl From Mill Valley” and “Rice Pudding”. Both are instrumentals. More interesting is that Jeff it seems allows for the band to share the spotlight. He is present no doubt, but so are the others here. And the new drummer, Tony Newman, in these songs does mix things up. There is a richer brew here, with changes in tempo, slowing things down, hyping them up, and back around again. Hopkin’s piano playing here helps with this. And then of course the last tune, “Rice Pudding”, is just moving along, again with the play of various time signatures and the like and then it just stops. Dead Halt. Done. Simply an interesting ending.



Beck-Ola Cover
So, an interesting album. Led Zeppelin II it is not, and that is what it was or would be compared to once that album was released in October of 1969. Beck Ola got mixed reviews from the press. I know I was told by my friends when I was loaned Truth and Beck Ola, that the second was alright. not as good at Truth. I would have to disagree today. It is shorter. Only 30 minutes long. I would have liked more but what I hear is a band that had grown and developed since its first album. It ain’t Zeppelin, but then again it ain’t 1969 anymore either.

Beck Ola is released in June of 1969. In July the Jeff Beck Group is back in the US. The tour is in part making up dates missed earlier in the year, and some new ones. They hit the Newport Jazz Festival on July 3rd. They do the Fillmore East one more time. Likewise, on July 14th they perform at the Schaefer Music Festival in Central Park in New York City. Of course they are scheduled in August to do another festival – Woodstock.

On July 13th they and Ten Years After are at the Singer Bowl in Queens warming up for Vanilla Fudge. It is interesting that soon enough, well, three years later, Jeff Beck is playing with Tim Bogert and Carmine Appice from that band, but again we get ahead of ourselves. That show in Queens ends in chaos on stage as the Jeff Beck Group is wrapping up its set.


Apparently, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, and John Bonham of Led Zeppelin arrive at the show. Bonham is done. Trashed or at least mildly intoxicated. The three proceed to join the Jeff Beck Group on stage to do a final song of the set, which is Jailhouse Rock. Why not?

Somehow it ends up that John Bonham who is behind the drums is arrested for public nudity. Rod Stewart it seems is likewise almost arrested? It seems Bonham was doing a strip tease from behind the drums, and meanwhile Stewart, who had been relieved of his vocal duties by Robert Plant was making himself useful by trying to penetrate Bonham using a mic stand. It is just another night of rock and roll.


Considering those events I am not sure how the song played out, but I am sure it was entertaining. Assuming the curtain was up. And again, the next night they performed in Central Park doing the Schaefer Beer Music Festival. That seems to have been their final show.

There was as I said above at least one more show on their itinerary – Woodstock. The Jeff Beck Group was scheduled to perform at the Woodstock Music Festival on August 17th. It was a month away. I am not sure there were any other dates in between. The recent shows they were doing in around NY were largely to make up for shows missed in March. So, it looks like they had some time to themselves in the US around NYC, and then Woodstock on the third and final day of the Woodstock Music Festival upstate in New York.


The Jeff Beck Group were at the top of the bill, going on right before the Band, but they did not make it that gig.
That, however, did not happen. the Jeff Beck Group did not perform at Woodstock. It appears that Jeff Beck went home to London sometime in late July. He did not inform his bandmates of his departure.

No one was sure where he went. It was similar to what he had done with the Yardbirds twice, abandoned his bandmates and went home. This time it was his band. Keep in mind this was after he had collapsed on stage in March, suffering from exhaustion and cancelled the remainder of that tour. That time in March the whole band had gone home. And again, these July shows were largely just making good on those cancelled dates in March.

Ultimately Nicky Hopkins was the only member to find his way to Woodstock, a fill-in for Jefferson Airplane’s keyboardist. You can hear Rod Stewart comment on the not playing Woodstock on the Showtime documentary – Jeff Beck: Still on The Run. Basically, Rod still does not know why they did not perform – to this day. When asked, Jeff basically says they were not ready, or he was not ready for such a show.

Woodstock was more than a show. It was more than a festival. It ended up being chaos. It became the festival. That is however the history. Even going into it, it was hyped as “the festival”. It was going to be recorded and made into a movie. Recorded for posterity. The lineup was incredible featuring the likes of Joplin, Hendrix, Santana, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Who and the list goes on. . And with that Jeff Beck departed the United States in mid-July, and the Jeff Beck Group, though scheduled, did not perform at Woodstock.

The vibe regarding Woodstock was a mixed bag. Some were turned off by the hippies and the ‘flower power’ and drug culture associated with them. That was the case with Bob Dylan it appears. Beck’s Stable mates, Led Zeppelin did not perform as Peter Grant felt it better that they headline their own gigs. And they did exactly that. Zeppelin filled the Asbury Park Convention Center in NJ two nights that same weekend in August. Maybe 150 miles away?

The Who would not perform until they were paid. Was Jeff in mid-July already getting the vibe that this was going to be a little crazy? Add to this that he was not into the whole hippy and drug culture thing. He grew his hair to some degree, played rock and roll but he was not a hippie.




He used this P-Bass while working with Jeff Beck

Ronnie Wood mentions his Fender Jazz Bass in this interview with Guitar Player in 1975:

"Wood’s first bass was a Fender Jazz he 'obtained' from Sound City, a music store around the block from where they rehearsed. 'I had no money,' he explains. 'I couldn’t pay for it, so I borrowed it and never took it back. About five years later I paid for it, after they tracked me down.'"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-09-27 17:46 by exilestones.

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: September 27, 2021 17:54


Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: stonesmuziekfan ()
Date: September 27, 2021 18:47

I have them but must send privatly because of official release,
Must check the number of bonustracks. Also if they are lossy or lossless.
Will send later this day. [Diner comes first]

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: Rank Stranger ()
Date: September 28, 2021 17:02

Jeff Beck Group
"BECK'S BEEB-LERO"
BBC Sessions, March 7, 1967 - September 17, 1968
- CAREFULLY COMPLETED COMPREHENSIVE COLLECTION

A) Sources: various b'casts

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967, first air date: March 18, 1967 - 15 min. EX quality except #1, which is VG++/EX- quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller, Dave Ambrose
1. I Ain't Superstitious (now pitch corrected by -7%)
2. Jeff Beck interview
3. Hi Ho Silver Lining
4. I Know I'm Losing You
5. Let Me Love You
6. Stone Cold Crazy

Show: Monday, Monday, air date: May 15, 1967, Playhouse Theatre, London - 3 min. VG- quality (Let Me Love You and Hi Ho Silver Lining were also played but not taped).
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
7. Rock My Plimsoul

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967, first air date: July 8, 1967 - 11 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
8. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
9. This Morning
10. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Nov. 1, 1967, first air date: Nov. 5, 1967 - 16 min. EX- quality.**
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
11. I Ain't Superstitious
12. Beck's Bolero
13. You'll Never get to Heaven
14. You Shook Me
15. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968, 1st air date Sept. 29, 1968 (except #17, first air date Nov. 3, 1968 acc. to "Jeff's Book") - 19 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
16. You Shook Me
17. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
18. Shapes of Things
19. Rice Pudding
20. Sweet Little Angel

cool smiley Sources: BBC's Transcription Disc LPs:

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967 - 5 min. EX quality.
21. Hi Ho Silver Lining
22. I Know I'm Losing You

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967 - 7 min. EX quality.
23. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
24. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968 - 6 min. EX quality
25. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
26. Shapes of Things (c. 1 min. of Jeff solo edited out - Grrrrr!)

Uploaded to Dimeadozen on November 30, 2017 by DocDondy with BIG TIME thanks to the previous uploaders Jeff J. and Mestique, and to my swapmate Ashbo for all fellow-Dimers to enjoy.

Link valid one week:

[ydray.com]

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: Rank Stranger ()
Date: September 28, 2021 18:21

The maestro at work:

[www.youtube.com]

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: rovalle ()
Date: September 29, 2021 15:26

Thanks for the BEEB Jeff Rank Stranger...mucho appreciado...One of the best shows I ever went to was at the Shrine Expo Hall in LA, 1969...Ten Years After, The Moody Blues & The Jeff Beck Group...some fun....

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: stonesmuziekfan ()
Date: September 29, 2021 23:14

THX RANK

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: StoneZP ()
Date: September 29, 2021 23:26

Thanks Hans-Jo!

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: coffeepotman ()
Date: September 30, 2021 18:40

Thank you for the BBC recordings, great stuff!

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: CaptainAcid ()
Date: October 1, 2021 14:19

Thank you Hans-Jo smoking smiley

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 2, 2021 23:11

Quote
Rank Stranger
Jeff Beck Group
"BECK'S BEEB-LERO"
BBC Sessions, March 7, 1967 - September 17, 1968
- CAREFULLY COMPLETED COMPREHENSIVE COLLECTION

A) Sources: various b'casts

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967, first air date: March 18, 1967 - 15 min. EX quality except #1, which is VG++/EX- quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller, Dave Ambrose
1. I Ain't Superstitious (now pitch corrected by -7%)
2. Jeff Beck interview
3. Hi Ho Silver Lining
4. I Know I'm Losing You
5. Let Me Love You
6. Stone Cold Crazy

Show: Monday, Monday, air date: May 15, 1967, Playhouse Theatre, London - 3 min. VG- quality (Let Me Love You and Hi Ho Silver Lining were also played but not taped).
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
7. Rock My Plimsoul

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967, first air date: July 8, 1967 - 11 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
8. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
9. This Morning
10. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Nov. 1, 1967, first air date: Nov. 5, 1967 - 16 min. EX- quality.**
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
11. I Ain't Superstitious
12. Beck's Bolero
13. You'll Never get to Heaven
14. You Shook Me
15. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968, 1st air date Sept. 29, 1968 (except #17, first air date Nov. 3, 1968 acc. to "Jeff's Book") - 19 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
16. You Shook Me
17. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
18. Shapes of Things
19. Rice Pudding
20. Sweet Little Angel

cool smiley Sources: BBC's Transcription Disc LPs:

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967 - 5 min. EX quality.
21. Hi Ho Silver Lining
22. I Know I'm Losing You

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967 - 7 min. EX quality.
23. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
24. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968 - 6 min. EX quality
25. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
26. Shapes of Things (c. 1 min. of Jeff solo edited out - Grrrrr!)

Uploaded to Dimeadozen on November 30, 2017 by DocDondy with BIG TIME thanks to the previous uploaders Jeff J. and Mestique, and to my swapmate Ashbo for all fellow-Dimers to enjoy.

Link valid one week:


[ydray.com]

Thanks

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: ahgriorr ()
Date: October 10, 2021 02:10

Quote
Rank Stranger
Jeff Beck Group
"BECK'S BEEB-LERO"
BBC Sessions, March 7, 1967 - September 17, 1968
- CAREFULLY COMPLETED COMPREHENSIVE COLLECTION

A) Sources: various b'casts

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967, first air date: March 18, 1967 - 15 min. EX quality except #1, which is VG++/EX- quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller, Dave Ambrose
1. I Ain't Superstitious (now pitch corrected by -7%)
2. Jeff Beck interview
3. Hi Ho Silver Lining
4. I Know I'm Losing You
5. Let Me Love You
6. Stone Cold Crazy

Show: Monday, Monday, air date: May 15, 1967, Playhouse Theatre, London - 3 min. VG- quality (Let Me Love You and Hi Ho Silver Lining were also played but not taped).
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
7. Rock My Plimsoul

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967, first air date: July 8, 1967 - 11 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Aynsley Dunbar.
8. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
9. This Morning
10. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Nov. 1, 1967, first air date: Nov. 5, 1967 - 16 min. EX- quality.**
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
11. I Ain't Superstitious
12. Beck's Bolero
13. You'll Never get to Heaven
14. You Shook Me
15. Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968, 1st air date Sept. 29, 1968 (except #17, first air date Nov. 3, 1968 acc. to "Jeff's Book") - 19 min. EX quality.
Line-up: Jeff Beck Group with Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, Mickey Waller.
16. You Shook Me
17. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
18. Shapes of Things
19. Rice Pudding
20. Sweet Little Angel

cool smiley Sources: BBC's Transcription Disc LPs:

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: March 7, 1967 - 5 min. EX quality.
21. Hi Ho Silver Lining
22. I Know I'm Losing You

Show: Saturday Club, rec. date: July 4, 1967 - 7 min. EX quality.
23. Rock My Plimsoul (longer than 17/9/1968 version)
24. Tallyman

Show: Top Gear, rec. date: Sept. 17, 1968 - 6 min. EX quality
25. Rock My Plimsoul (shorter than 4/7/1967 version)
26. Shapes of Things (c. 1 min. of Jeff solo edited out - Grrrrr!)

Uploaded to Dimeadozen on November 30, 2017 by DocDondy with BIG TIME thanks to the previous uploaders Jeff J. and Mestique, and to my swapmate Ashbo for all fellow-Dimers to enjoy.

Link valid one week:

[ydray.com]


Is it possible to re-upload please ?
Thanks in advance.

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: Rank Stranger ()
Date: October 10, 2021 19:10

One more time:

[ydray.com]

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 11, 2021 17:43

Quote
Rank Stranger
One more time:

[ydray.com]

Thank you

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 11, 2021 17:45




[www.youtube.com]

12/83 ARMS Concert M.S.G.,NYC

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: vancouver ()
Date: October 11, 2021 19:46

[wetransfer.com]



Jeff Beck Group 1968-11-03.Detroit


Jeff Beck Group 1969-05-06.Boston Tea Party

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: crholmstrom ()
Date: October 11, 2021 20:43

Quote
vancouver
[wetransfer.com]



Jeff Beck Group 1968-11-03.Detroit


Jeff Beck Group 1969-05-06.Boston Tea Party

Thank you. Good stuff!

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: ahgriorr ()
Date: October 12, 2021 19:14

Thanks

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: Kingbeebuzz ()
Date: October 14, 2021 19:27

Many thanks for these downloads.

When Jeff Beck is singing Hi Ho Silver Lining, does anyone know what Rod Stewart did on stage during the song ? Or did he leave the stage ?

Re: ISO: Jeff Beck and Ron Wood -"Truth" and "Ola"
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: October 16, 2021 12:29

Quote
crholmstrom
Quote
vancouver
[wetransfer.com]



Jeff Beck Group 1968-11-03.Detroit


Jeff Beck Group 1969-05-06.Boston Tea Party

Thank you. Good stuff!

Thank you!



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