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Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Spodlumt ()
Date: January 16, 2022 04:14

Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me":

[www.youtube.com]

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: treaclefingers ()
Date: January 16, 2022 04:18

You got me!

I wouldn't describe it as 'harder rocking' though...maybe 'faster rocking'?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2022-01-16 04:19 by treaclefingers.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: January 16, 2022 04:36

Use ta watch the Nelsons TV show
and when Ricky sang my older brother Mick would
always yell out "Why doesnt open his eyes when he sings" .....



ROCKMAN

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: 24FPS ()
Date: January 16, 2022 10:34

It's not another version. It's not the same song, only the title is the same.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: January 16, 2022 13:06

Of course it’s not the same song.The only time Nelson and Jagger sang the same song is when Nelson sang a cover of Honky Tonk Women for which he was booed at Madison Square Garden in 1972

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: TravellinMan ()
Date: January 16, 2022 20:06

Quote
Spodlumt
Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me":

[www.youtube.com]

Thanks for posting this. It is enjoyable. I remember him trying so hard to be called Rick, not Ricky. Same song? Maybe an inspiration? Same sentiment for sure.

Just keep smiling

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: January 16, 2022 21:29

Ricky Nelson’s music from the late 50’s to early 60’s is unbeatable, almost. Such great rock n’ roll: Hello, Mary Lou, Believe What You Say, Waiting In School, It’s Late, Travelling Man, etc. They’re all terrific. James Burton’s telecaster really made everything shine, too. A huge influence on Jimmy Page.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: January 16, 2022 21:44

The Strikes cut it first in 1957 for Imperial .....



ROCKMAN

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: TravellinMan ()
Date: January 16, 2022 22:04

Quote
Rockman
The Strikes cut it first in 1957 for Imperial .....

Thanks.

[www.youtube.com]

Just keep smiling

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: January 16, 2022 23:38

Ricky Nelson in the 1950s was great.Traveling Man is the name of another Stones song

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: January 17, 2022 00:18

Needless to say the Stones were heavily inspired by the Beatles and Ricky Nelson, but then again many other great bands were also.

_____________________________________________________________
Rip this joint, gonna save your soul, round and round and round we go......

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: MKjan ()
Date: January 17, 2022 00:44

The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: January 17, 2022 00:53

Maybe Gram Parsons singing was influenced by Nelson

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: January 17, 2022 01:49

No Buddy Holly NO Mop Tops ....



ROCKMAN

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: loog droog ()
Date: January 17, 2022 05:46

Bob Marley said he was influenced by Nelson.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: treaclefingers ()
Date: January 17, 2022 08:21

The band's on stage and it's one of those nights. The drummer KNOWS that he is dynamite!

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: January 17, 2022 10:14

Quote
Hairball
Needless to say the Stones were heavily inspired by the Beatles and Ricky Nelson, but then again many other great bands were also.

I like you sense of humor, Hairball grinning smiley

I'm a GHOST living in a ghost town

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: January 17, 2022 13:15

Quote
MKjan
The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

I’m sure Keith was a fan, perhaps? Although he was a fan of the blues, I’m under the impression that rock ‘n roll was his ‘thing’, whilst it was Mick, and obviously, Brian, who were the real blues aficionados.

Anyway, it’s widely known that Nelson was an influence on the likes of Jimmy Page.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Koen ()
Date: January 17, 2022 15:11

Quote
Big Al
Quote
MKjan
The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

I’m sure Keith was a fan, perhaps?

Of the Everly Brothers? Yup:

video: [www.youtube.com]

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: bob r ()
Date: January 17, 2022 15:13

awesome ! Rick Nelson and James Burton !!!!!!!!

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: January 17, 2022 18:15

Quote
Koen
Quote
Big Al
Quote
MKjan
The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

I’m sure Keith was a fan, perhaps?

Of the Everly Brothers? Yup:

video: [www.youtube.com]

Oh, of course! I'm sure he probably enjoyed Ricky Nelson, too. I can't imagine why he wouldn't.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: MKjan ()
Date: January 17, 2022 21:58

Quote
Big Al
Quote
Koen
Quote
Big Al
Quote
MKjan
The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

I’m sure Keith was a fan, perhaps?

Of the Everly Brothers? Yup:

video: [www.youtube.com]

Oh, of course! I'm sure he probably enjoyed Ricky Nelson, too. I can't imagine why he wouldn't.

I'm sure Keith liked the Everly Brothers.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: January 17, 2022 22:16

Quote
Big Al
Quote
Koen
Quote
Big Al
Quote
MKjan
The Stones were not heavily inspired by Ricky Nelson, but:
No Everly Brothers, no Beatles.

I’m sure Keith was a fan, perhaps?

Of the Everly Brothers? Yup:

video: [www.youtube.com]

Oh, of course! I'm sure he probably enjoyed Ricky Nelson, too. I can't imagine why he wouldn't.

Music lovers love music. I love some Michael Jackson songs, some Beach Boys songs, some Doors songs, some U2 songs, many Who songs, some Dylan songs even, etc., etc., but that is something quite different from being inspired by certain music and connected artists.
The 1964 and 1965 albums are the real answer. Where Rick Nelson, where Beatles???
Rubbish. Not Fade Away was, in those years, the only real essential inspiration song from Buddy Holly, rearranged by Keith and perfected by the band and some friends. I Wanna Be Your Man had nothing to do with inspiration. It was nothing more and nothing less than a song given to them by John and Paul and adjusted to the way the Stones liked to make music. During the 1963 - 1965 period they merely picked songs they loved and made them into great Stones versions. By the time 1966 came close, things changed, mostly due to Oldham's continuous pressure and so Aftermath came ... a great mix of .. everything ..
Sure, Keith, being a guitar player obviously was listening around to other guitar players and picked bits and pieces here and there. So did Mick on vocals. Brian we all know ... just name a bunch of Blues artists (either guitar or blues harp).
Inspiration is quite a bit deeper
Keith once said that the most successful songwriters are the ones with the biggest record collection ...

smileys with beer

I'm a GHOST living in a ghost town

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: January 18, 2022 06:36

"The (Felice and Boudleaux Bryant) exhibit also features a white lace dress that Felice Bryant wore to accept a BMI Award in the 1950s; a fan letter from the Rolling Stones' Keith Richards; their well-loved, nearly tattered thesaurus; their tape recorder; and the recipe for Felice's Sicilian pasta sauce, which she made for dinners with publishing executives before playing them songs at the couple's home."

[theboot.com]


Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: January 18, 2022 10:48

Quote
Taylor1
Of course it’s not the same song.The only time Nelson and Jagger sang the same song is when Nelson sang a cover of Honky Tonk Women for which he was booed at Madison Square Garden in 1972

Isn’t that the show that led him to write Garden Party? ‘When I sang a song about a honky tonk, it was time to leave.” I’d never known that referred to HTW.

[www.songfacts.com]

[m.youtube.com]


Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Taylor1 ()
Date: January 18, 2022 16:10

Quote
SomeTorontoGirl
Quote
Taylor1
Of course it’s not the same song.The only time Nelson and Jagger sang the same song is when Nelson sang a cover of Honky Tonk Women for which he was booed at Madison Square Garden in 1972

Isn’t that the show that led him to write Garden Party? ‘When I sang a song about a honky tonk, it was time to leave.” I’d never known that referred to HTW.

[www.songfacts.com]

[m.youtube.com]
Yes,Garden Party was about him singing Honky Tonk Women at the Garden.He also refers to John and Yoko being atthe concert in the song.Always thought Gram Parsons was influenced by Nelson as a singer.They were both great

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: dmay ()
Date: January 19, 2022 18:07

Just like Elvis' early albums, you can cherry pick through Nelson's albums and find some great songs that were not hits. Same with the Everly Brothers albums. The Everly Brothers were an influence on the Beatles, but also add Arthur Alexander as an influence into the vocal stylings of the Beatles. The Stones covered a few Alexander songs, if I remember right, on their early albums.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: frenki09 ()
Date: January 19, 2022 20:18

I actually LOVE Nelson's take on "Honky Tonk Women." I love most of the songs he recorded with the Stone Canyon Band.
Pick up the Legacy boxed set (4 CDs) if you aren't a completist. A fine overview of his rich career. "Rick Nelson In Concert" is one of my favourite live albums.

*** The Fun Facts … As to the song “Garden Party”: The lyrics to the song provide a detailed account of what transpired that fateful evening at Madison Square Garden, with listeners continually attempting to connect the dots. “My old friends,” refers to the other artists on the bill that night, Bo Diddley, Bobby Rydell and the Coasters. “Yoko brought her walrus” was a nod to John Lennon (“I Am the Walrus) and Yoko Ono who were both at the show that evening. “I said hello to Mary Lou, she belongs to me” were two of the songs Nelson sang, while “I sang a song about a honky tonk,” referenced “Honky Tonk Woman” by the Rolling Stones, a cover Rick laid down. “Out stepped Johnny B. Goode” was a gesture to the night’s headliner Chuck Berry, as was the line “Playing guitar like ringing a bell,” a line from Berry’s 1958 hit sing. It seems the lyrics that most captured everyone’s attention were “Mr. Hughes hid in Dylan’s shoes.” While most thought Rick was referencing Howard Hughes, in reality it was Nelson’s dear friend George Harrison (of the Beatles) who was known to register at hotels using the name Hughes, and attended the show in disguise along with Mr. Dylan. By Jenell Kesler from Discogs.com

Zimmerman about Rick Nelson:

“He sang his songs calm and steady like he was in the middle of a storm, men hurling past him. His voice was sort of mysterious and made you fall into a certain mood. I’d always felt kin to him. In a few years’ time he’d record some of my songs, make them sound like they were his own, like he had written them himself. He eventually did write one himself and mentioned my name in it. The thing was that Ricky was still making records and that’s what I wanted to do, too.” - Bob Dylan

Ricky said this about Bob Dylan’s influence; “My idol as far as a writer is Bob Dylan, who I think was really the spokesman for that period where the country was going through a lot of changes, politically, and I really think he was the poet of that era.”

After Ricky’s death, Bob Dylan paid tribute to Ricky while on tour, with a moment of silence and a version of Ricky’s hit song “Lonesome Town” at each concert.

He also covered Legend In My Time (I’d Be) in concert which he only performed 3 times in 1989 and never again.

The entire excerpt from Bob Dylan’s book “Chronicles” where he talks about Ricky’s influence on his music:

"One afternoon I was in there pouring Coke into a glass from a milk pitcher when I heard a voice coming cool through the screen of the radio speaker…Ricky Nelson was singing his new song, “Travelin’ Man”. Ricky had a smooth touch, the way he crooned in fast rhythm, the tonation of his voice. He was different than the rest of the teen idols, had a great guitarist who played like a cross between a honky-tonk hero and a barn-dance fiddler.

Nelson had never been a bold innovator like the early singers who sang like they were navigating burning ships. He didn’t sing desperately, do a lot of damage, and you’d never mistake him for a shaman. It didn’t feel like his endurance was ever being tested to the utmost, but it didn’t matter.

He sang his songs calm and steady like he was in the middle of a storm, men hurling past him. His voice was sort of mysterious and made you fall into a certain mood. I had been a big fan of Ricky’s and still liked him, but that type of music was on its way out. It had no chance of meaning anything. There’d be no future for that stuff in the future. It was all a mistake.

What was not a mistake was the ghost of Billy Lyons, rootin’ the mountain down, standing ‘round in East Cairo, Black Betty bam be lam. That was no mistake. That’s the stuff that was happening. That’s the stuff that could make you question what you’d always accepted, could litter the landscape with broken hearts, had power of spirit.

Ricky, as usual, was singing bleached out lyrics. Lyrics probably written just for him. I’d always felt kin to him, though. We were about the same age, probably liked the same things, from the same generation although our life experience had been so dissimilar, him being brought up out West on a family TV show.

It was like he’d been born and raised on Walden Pond where everything was hunky-dory, and I’d come out of the dark demonic woods, same forest, just a different way of looking at things. Ricky’s talent was very accessible to me. I felt we had a lot in common. In a few years’ time he’d record some of my songs, make them sound like they were his own, like he had written them himself. He eventually did write one himself and mentioned my name in it.

Ricky, in about ten years’ time, would even get booed while onstage for changing what was perceived as his musical direction. It turned out we did have a lot in common. There was no way to know that standing in the kitchen of the Café Wha? listening to that smooth, monotone drawl. The thing was that Ricky was still making records and that’s what I wanted to do, too.

I envisioned myself recording for Folkways Records. That was the label I wanted to be on. That was the label that put out all the great records. Ricky’s song ended and I gave the rest of my French fries to Tiny Tim, went back into the outer room to see what Fred was up to."


In an interview published in bobdylan.com Bob was asked to pick a favorite song by another artist that mentions his name in the lyrics. His pick: “Garden Party” by Ricky Nelson.

The Wikipedia page has some real good facts about the song telling us the song relates the story of Nelson being booed at a concert at Madison Square Garden on October 15, 1971 and billed as “Richard Nader’s Rock ‘n Roll Revival.”

Also on the bill were Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and Bobby Rydell.

Wiki reports that “Nelson came on stage dressed in the then-current fashion, wearing bell-bottoms and a purple velvet shirt, with his hair hanging down to his shoulders. He started playing his older songs like “Hello Mary Lou”, but then he played the Rolling Stones’ “Country Honk” (a country version of their hit song “Honky Tonk Women”) and the crowd began to boo. While some reports say that the booing was caused by police action in the back of the audience, Nelson thought it was directed at him. Nevertheless, he sang another song but then left the building and did not appear onstage for the finale.”

Wiki also tells us that “One more reference in the lyrics pertains to a particularly mysterious and legendary audience member: “Mr. Hughes hid in Dylan’s shoes, wearing his disguise”. The Mr. Hughes in question was apparently George Harrison, who was a next-door neighbor and good friend of Nelson’s. Harrison used “Hughes” as his traveling alias.”

They suggest that “hid in Dylan’s shoes” may refer to an album of Bob Dylan covers that Harrison was planning but never recorded.

Ricky Nelson however did cover lots of Dylan songs over the years, I shall Be Released, If You Gotta Go, Mama You’ve Been On My Mind, Love Minus Zero, walking Down the line and perhaps best of all She Belongs To Me.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Date: January 19, 2022 20:42

Quote
dmay
Just like Elvis' early albums, you can cherry pick through Nelson's albums and find some great songs that were not hits. Same with the Everly Brothers albums. The Everly Brothers were an influence on the Beatles, but also add Arthur Alexander as an influence into the vocal stylings of the Beatles. The Stones covered a few Alexander songs, if I remember right, on their early albums.

You Better Move On.

Re: Ricky Nelson's harder rocking version of "If You Can't Rock Me"
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: January 19, 2022 21:44

Arthur Alexander ... only songwriter
covered by The Rolling Stones ... Dylan and the Mop Tops



ROCKMAN

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