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Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: floodonthepage ()
Date: October 4, 2021 20:56

I just now finally read the Sam Cutler article on Charlie that was posted a couple pages back. I guess I'm processing through things rather slowly.

What a great tribute. I really wish I could have met Charlie to thank him in person.

I work with a guy who did much of the video work on the Licks tour, and as such he spent a year and a half on the road with Charlie. He has told me some fun and interesting stories, but above all else what I love to hear is that it's all true what they say about Charlie. He really IS that guy that Sam describes. There's simply too many people who have had the same kind of experiences with him for it to be unique treatment for a chosen few. Charlie treated everyone with respect.

God Bless You, Charlie.

P.S. In other news, I just learned yesterday that the drum track on Charlie's video tribute before the shows on this current tour is taken from Can't You Hear Me Knocking, and I feel like an idiot. How did I not pick up on that, considering that it's my favorite Stones track. The iso track has such a crack to it that at first I thought it was Steve sitting in the darkness playing along to the video...sacrilege, I know. Now I hear it and of course it's so obviously Charlie, with not only that crack but that almighty swing.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: October 6, 2021 14:51

The Rolling Stones’ producer Chris Kimsey on Charlie Watts: “It’s all in the style”

The longtime Stones producer and engineer remembers a “gentleman”

By Chris Kimsey
4th October 2021

“Charlie [Watts] never changed over the years. When I first worked with the Stones, on Sticky Fingers, I wasn’t really noticing the individual personalities in the band. They just struck me as strong, innovative characters, searching for something in their sound and their groove. But as I got to know them, I realised that Charlie was just a wonderful, wonderful person.

“After many years I could never figure out why he was in the band, because he was not like the others. The rest of them were all frontmen, as it were – though I’m sure Mick wouldn’t agree. Even Bill had this persona. Charlie was just this quiet man at the back, but he was the one holding it all together.

“His energy was intense. I’ve worked with drummers who go through their drum heads after one session, because they hit them so hard. But while Charlie was not a heavy hitter – his touch was lighter because his background was in jazz – he had this ability to hit them the way they should be and get a very loud tone.

“Most drummers hit the hi-hat at the same time as the snare, which is a very normal thing to do. But Charlie would always lift his hand off the hi-hat, so there would just be the snare beat alone. Nothing around it, which was a dream to record. That, in itself, made his drums sound louder and more powerful. I didn’t figure that out until I was working on Some Girls with them, but it was terrific to discover.

“Excuse the pun, but he was so in tune with his drums. There was one session when I got there before anyone arrived. I was sitting down at his drumkit and decided to tune the snare up a little, so I literally did a half turn on two of the lugs. When Charlie came in that night, he sat down and hit his snare drum. And after the first hit he just stopped and looked up in shock. I said, ‘What’s wrong?’ He said, ‘Someone’s touched my drums!’ It was such a minimal thing, but he knew the response so well. It was amazing that he could immediately pick up on such a small change.

“Charlie was No 1 when it comes to drummers. What he did for the Stones’ music, no-one else could do that. That’s why Steve Jordan is in the band now, because he just emulated Charlie. He learned how to play by watching and listening to him. A lot of drummers I’ve worked with have said, ‘I want to sound like Charlie Watts.’ And I’d say, ‘Well, good luck there, mate. You don’t sound anything like him.’ It’s all in the style. They think they have it, but Charlie had so many subtleties that made such a difference when it came to the big picture. Coming from a jazz background, his playing had dynamics in it. It wasn’t just thump-thump-thump. He was extraordinary.”

As told to Rob Hughes

[www.uncut.co.uk]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: witterings ()
Date: October 13, 2021 20:29



Is this a staged shooting? If so, he is doing it pretty well.
Never heard him playing the sax.

It`s nice to be here, .....

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Rollin92 ()
Date: October 13, 2021 23:06

One of the newspapers mentioned at the time of Charlie’s death that there were plans afoot to celebrate Charlie’s life in the U.K. later this year. Any word on this?

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: October 14, 2021 13:11

Quote
bye bye johnny
The Rolling Stones’ producer Chris Kimsey on Charlie Watts: “It’s all in the style”

The longtime Stones producer and engineer remembers a “gentleman”

By Chris Kimsey
4th October 2021

“Charlie [Watts] never changed over the years. When I first worked with the Stones, on Sticky Fingers, I wasn’t really noticing the individual personalities in the band. They just struck me as strong, innovative characters, searching for something in their sound and their groove. But as I got to know them, I realised that Charlie was just a wonderful, wonderful person.

“After many years I could never figure out why he was in the band, because he was not like the others. The rest of them were all frontmen, as it were – though I’m sure Mick wouldn’t agree. Even Bill had this persona. Charlie was just this quiet man at the back, but he was the one holding it all together.

“His energy was intense. I’ve worked with drummers who go through their drum heads after one session, because they hit them so hard. But while Charlie was not a heavy hitter – his touch was lighter because his background was in jazz – he had this ability to hit them the way they should be and get a very loud tone.

“Most drummers hit the hi-hat at the same time as the snare, which is a very normal thing to do. But Charlie would always lift his hand off the hi-hat, so there would just be the snare beat alone. Nothing around it, which was a dream to record. That, in itself, made his drums sound louder and more powerful. I didn’t figure that out until I was working on Some Girls with them, but it was terrific to discover.

“Excuse the pun, but he was so in tune with his drums. There was one session when I got there before anyone arrived. I was sitting down at his drumkit and decided to tune the snare up a little, so I literally did a half turn on two of the lugs. When Charlie came in that night, he sat down and hit his snare drum. And after the first hit he just stopped and looked up in shock. I said, ‘What’s wrong?’ He said, ‘Someone’s touched my drums!’ It was such a minimal thing, but he knew the response so well. It was amazing that he could immediately pick up on such a small change.

“Charlie was No 1 when it comes to drummers. What he did for the Stones’ music, no-one else could do that. That’s why Steve Jordan is in the band now, because he just emulated Charlie. He learned how to play by watching and listening to him. A lot of drummers I’ve worked with have said, ‘I want to sound like Charlie Watts.’ And I’d say, ‘Well, good luck there, mate. You don’t sound anything like him.’ It’s all in the style. They think they have it, but Charlie had so many subtleties that made such a difference when it came to the big picture. Coming from a jazz background, his playing had dynamics in it. It wasn’t just thump-thump-thump. He was extraordinary.”

As told to Rob Hughes

[www.uncut.co.uk]

Great insider review about Charlie! Charlie, the times I experienced him, always radiates a human touch, which, with all those "maniac" fans around, isn't easy at all. In 2002 I was in Boston (for the three different concerts) and was at the "Stones" hotel a couple of times in connection with merchandising issues. One day I came back from the park opposite the hotel and ran into Charlie on the pedestrian crossing. He was on his way for a walk in the park. He appeared to recognize me (Ronnie Scott's ... 2001) when we looked at eachother. He nodded his head with a friendly smile and so did I. Not a moment came up in my head to bother him with whatever questions I might have had, even when editing for a fanzine. With Charlie you simply don't do that. cool smiley

My eyes get wet ... it still hurts talking about him ...

I'm a GHOST living in a ghost town

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: October 21, 2021 17:20

Quote
Rollin92

One of the newspapers mentioned at the time of Charlie’s death that there were plans afoot to celebrate Charlie’s life in the U.K. later this year. Any word on this?

"Charlie Watts tribute show in London show in December or early next year. The Rolling Stones will be there but it won't be exclusively a Stones gig." - [iorr.org] .

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