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Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Ali ()
Date: August 27, 2021 22:20

Quote
Koen
Wonderful tribute from the band:

[twitter.com]

Thank you.
I smiled throughout and the good times rolled.
Then the silence at the end, that shook me.
I'm so happy to enjoy the gift that Charlie shared.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: carlitosbaez ()
Date: August 27, 2021 23:02

Last night Blackberry Smoke honoring Charlie in Boston,

[youtu.be]

[www.facebook.com]

Carlitos
Tenerife

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: babyblue ()
Date: August 28, 2021 00:40

I’m so sad about Charlie. I’m in shock. All my condolences to his family, friends & fans. Thanks Charlie for all you did, I followed you since I was 22, I’m much older now and it was nice having you in my life. The music says it all. It’s brightened my day many times when I was down. God bless you.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: StonesLO ()
Date: August 28, 2021 00:55

.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-29 23:27 by StonesLO.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: August 28, 2021 01:05


"R.I.P. Charlie !" - by Sebastian Krüger, 24-Aug-2021 - [www.Instagram.com] , Large picture



"A true gentleman has left." - by Sebastian Krüger, 25-Aug-2021 - [www.Instagram.com] , Large picture

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: drwatts ()
Date: August 28, 2021 01:41

Quote
ErwinH
Quote
SomeTorontoGirl



Beautiful... thanks SomeTorontoGirl...
I second that STG. Never heard that before. Best version. I'm finding it really hard to listen to my all time heroes right now tho. Makes me so, so bloody sad...

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: August 28, 2021 02:11

I don't think that's been posted : Drummer Steve Gorman On Charlie Watts' Untouchable Legacy [www.pollstar.com]

I'd never heard about Gorman until I read his book a couple of years ago, pretty good stuff and that interview is of the same silk I would say

Quote

"I mean, they were just in such a pressure cooker, and through it all, there’s just this dude wearing a suit not saying a @#$%& word but just sitting there. And the confidence that every member of that band has knowing Charlie’s back there, you can’t quantify that. I mean, live music is confidence.

Recording, it’s all about confidence and their greatness is a testament to that. The fact that they were built on the most solid foundation.

It’s just like, “If Charlie’s good, then we’re good” and they understood that, to their credit."

Edit - He mentions the Bobby Keys tribute that the Stones attended, is that where Keith is said to have taken pictures with a smartphone or am I confusing it with something else, maybe in Chicago at Buddy Guy's club ?

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 02:14 by gotdablouse.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: SomeTorontoGirl ()
Date: August 28, 2021 02:16

Quote
drwatts
I second that STG. Never heard that before. Best version. I'm finding it really hard to listen to my all time heroes right now tho. Makes me so, so bloody sad...

Thanks Richard, it’s been hard, hasn’t it? They were all supposed to live forever. And I guess they will…let the air waves flow. Take care.





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 02:17 by SomeTorontoGirl.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 28, 2021 03:26

Rolling Stones fan who drove trucks for band shares memories of late drummer Charlie Watts
ABC Radio Melbourne / By Madi Chwasta



If you thought you were the number one Australian fan of the Rolling Stones, think again.

Not only is John Abbott a self-confessed superfan — who says he has seen the band play live about 50 times — the well-known long-distance truck driver also commissioned an artist to paint three of his prime movers and a trailer with portraits of all the band members.

Mr Abbott told ABC Radio Melbourne that decorating one truck alone had cost him $25,000.

"On the driver's side was Keith Richards on the passenger door, Ronnie Wood [was] on the bed, [on] the windbreaker was Mick Jagger — and the whole back of the [cabin] was Charlie Watts and his drum kit," he said.

"People would say it looked incredible."



Fan from young

Brisbane-based Mr Abbott — who now drives trucks up and down Australia's east coast — has fond memories of seeing the Rolling Stones live.

His obsession started after he saw them at London's Finsbury Park in 1964, around the time he met his wife, Chrissy.

"It was all screaming," he said. "You couldn't hear anything — but it was just great to see them."



The 72-year-old saw them play again and again and planned overseas holidays around their tour dates.

However, Mr Abbott said a highlight was driving trucks for the band across Australia as part of the 40 Licks Tour in early 2000.

I got to see them perform night after night for seven weeks," he said.

"They would come down to the loading dock just to say hello

John and Chrissy Abbott met in the UK, around the time they saw the Rolling Stones live for the first time in 1964.(Supplied: Chris Abbott)

Mr Abbott said Watts was a "humble" man in conversation, and on the drums.

"It's not [Watts's] game [to do drum solos]. His job [was] to create the beat for the rest of the boys," he said.

"It's amazing what that man [did] with just four drums."

Best in music'

Mr Abbott said his favourite song was It's All Over Now — which, he said, would be the first song played at his funeral – followed by Start Me Up, Sympathy for the Devil, Brown Sugar and Honky Tonk Woman.
"But they haven't done anything I don't like," he said.

While it is believed the band will still perform without its original drummer, Mr Abbott said he would like to see them stop making music, despite his love for them.



"I hope the Stones hang their boots [up] and leave it to the wonderful 61 years they gave," he said. "They're the best in music without a doubt and always will be."

Melbourne fans share love for Watts

ABC Radio Melbourne listeners also shared their love for the Rolling Stones and their memories of Watts.

James from Inverloch said he spent Wednesday morning listening to the Charlie Watts Jim Keltner Project record and reminisced about seeing the Rolling Stones play at Kooyong Stadium in the '70s.



Another listener, Michael, said he was fortunate enough to be part of the cabin crew on the band's Los Angeles-to-Sydney flight, ahead of the 40 Licks Tour, and observed Watts to be "a quiet, unassuming man".

Annette from Lara said Watts was in the school jazz band with her brother, who got to meet and practise with him in their lounge room a couple of times.

Listener Simon celebrated Watts as "one of the most sartorial men in rock", while another listener, Brent, said, "I've always loved that Charlie provided the beat and Keith provided the Watts."
[www.abc.net.au]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: drwatts ()
Date: August 28, 2021 03:50

Quote
SomeTorontoGirl
Quote
drwatts
I second that STG. Never heard that before. Best version. I'm finding it really hard to listen to my all time heroes right now tho. Makes me so, so bloody sad...

Thanks Richard, it’s been hard, hasn’t it? They were all supposed to live forever. And I guess they will…let the air waves flow. Take care.
Let the tear ducts flow as well.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: StonedAsiaExile ()
Date: August 28, 2021 04:11

Quote
MisterDDDD
Rolling Stones fan who drove trucks for band shares memories of late drummer Charlie Watts
ABC Radio Melbourne / By Madi Chwasta



If you thought you were the number one Australian fan of the Rolling Stones, think again.

Not only is John Abbott a self-confessed superfan — who says he has seen the band play live about 50 times — the well-known long-distance truck driver also commissioned an artist to paint three of his prime movers and a trailer with portraits of all the band members.

Mr Abbott told ABC Radio Melbourne that decorating one truck alone had cost him $25,000.

"On the driver's side was Keith Richards on the passenger door, Ronnie Wood [was] on the bed, [on] the windbreaker was Mick Jagger — and the whole back of the [cabin] was Charlie Watts and his drum kit," he said.

"People would say it looked incredible."



Fan from young

Brisbane-based Mr Abbott — who now drives trucks up and down Australia's east coast — has fond memories of seeing the Rolling Stones live.

His obsession started after he saw them at London's Finsbury Park in 1964, around the time he met his wife, Chrissy.

"It was all screaming," he said. "You couldn't hear anything — but it was just great to see them."



The 72-year-old saw them play again and again and planned overseas holidays around their tour dates.

However, Mr Abbott said a highlight was driving trucks for the band across Australia as part of the 40 Licks Tour in early 2000.

I got to see them perform night after night for seven weeks," he said.

"They would come down to the loading dock just to say hello

John and Chrissy Abbott met in the UK, around the time they saw the Rolling Stones live for the first time in 1964.(Supplied: Chris Abbott)

Mr Abbott said Watts was a "humble" man in conversation, and on the drums.

"It's not [Watts's] game [to do drum solos]. His job [was] to create the beat for the rest of the boys," he said.

"It's amazing what that man [did] with just four drums."

Best in music'

Mr Abbott said his favourite song was It's All Over Now — which, he said, would be the first song played at his funeral – followed by Start Me Up, Sympathy for the Devil, Brown Sugar and Honky Tonk Woman.
"But they haven't done anything I don't like," he said.

While it is believed the band will still perform without its original drummer, Mr Abbott said he would like to see them stop making music, despite his love for them.



"I hope the Stones hang their boots [up] and leave it to the wonderful 61 years they gave," he said. "They're the best in music without a doubt and always will be."

Melbourne fans share love for Watts

ABC Radio Melbourne listeners also shared their love for the Rolling Stones and their memories of Watts.

James from Inverloch said he spent Wednesday morning listening to the Charlie Watts Jim Keltner Project record and reminisced about seeing the Rolling Stones play at Kooyong Stadium in the '70s.



Another listener, Michael, said he was fortunate enough to be part of the cabin crew on the band's Los Angeles-to-Sydney flight, ahead of the 40 Licks Tour, and observed Watts to be "a quiet, unassuming man".

Annette from Lara said Watts was in the school jazz band with her brother, who got to meet and practise with him in their lounge room a couple of times.

Listener Simon celebrated Watts as "one of the most sartorial men in rock", while another listener, Brent, said, "I've always loved that Charlie provided the beat and Keith provided the Watts."
[www.abc.net.au]

This is true love!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Date: August 28, 2021 04:24

This is an awesome tribute!

I'd love to see this driving down the road.

Quote
StonedAsiaExile
Quote
MisterDDDD
Rolling Stones fan who drove trucks for band shares memories of late drummer Charlie Watts
ABC Radio Melbourne / By Madi Chwasta



If you thought you were the number one Australian fan of the Rolling Stones, think again.

Not only is John Abbott a self-confessed superfan — who says he has seen the band play live about 50 times — the well-known long-distance truck driver also commissioned an artist to paint three of his prime movers and a trailer with portraits of all the band members.

Mr Abbott told ABC Radio Melbourne that decorating one truck alone had cost him $25,000.

"On the driver's side was Keith Richards on the passenger door, Ronnie Wood [was] on the bed, [on] the windbreaker was Mick Jagger — and the whole back of the [cabin] was Charlie Watts and his drum kit," he said.

"People would say it looked incredible."



Fan from young

Brisbane-based Mr Abbott — who now drives trucks up and down Australia's east coast — has fond memories of seeing the Rolling Stones live.

His obsession started after he saw them at London's Finsbury Park in 1964, around the time he met his wife, Chrissy.

"It was all screaming," he said. "You couldn't hear anything — but it was just great to see them."



The 72-year-old saw them play again and again and planned overseas holidays around their tour dates.

However, Mr Abbott said a highlight was driving trucks for the band across Australia as part of the 40 Licks Tour in early 2000.

I got to see them perform night after night for seven weeks," he said.

"They would come down to the loading dock just to say hello

John and Chrissy Abbott met in the UK, around the time they saw the Rolling Stones live for the first time in 1964.(Supplied: Chris Abbott)

Mr Abbott said Watts was a "humble" man in conversation, and on the drums.

"It's not [Watts's] game [to do drum solos]. His job [was] to create the beat for the rest of the boys," he said.

"It's amazing what that man [did] with just four drums."

Best in music'

Mr Abbott said his favourite song was It's All Over Now — which, he said, would be the first song played at his funeral – followed by Start Me Up, Sympathy for the Devil, Brown Sugar and Honky Tonk Woman.
"But they haven't done anything I don't like," he said.

While it is believed the band will still perform without its original drummer, Mr Abbott said he would like to see them stop making music, despite his love for them.



"I hope the Stones hang their boots [up] and leave it to the wonderful 61 years they gave," he said. "They're the best in music without a doubt and always will be."

Melbourne fans share love for Watts

ABC Radio Melbourne listeners also shared their love for the Rolling Stones and their memories of Watts.

James from Inverloch said he spent Wednesday morning listening to the Charlie Watts Jim Keltner Project record and reminisced about seeing the Rolling Stones play at Kooyong Stadium in the '70s.



Another listener, Michael, said he was fortunate enough to be part of the cabin crew on the band's Los Angeles-to-Sydney flight, ahead of the 40 Licks Tour, and observed Watts to be "a quiet, unassuming man".

Annette from Lara said Watts was in the school jazz band with her brother, who got to meet and practise with him in their lounge room a couple of times.

Listener Simon celebrated Watts as "one of the most sartorial men in rock", while another listener, Brent, said, "I've always loved that Charlie provided the beat and Keith provided the Watts."
[www.abc.net.au]

This is true love!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: snorton ()
Date: August 28, 2021 06:28

Is it possible this moment spurs Mick & Keith to pen their greatest love song ever...Wild Horses X10, for their fallen brother?
Then have it be the final song on their final album...name of the song, "Sticks and Stones".



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 06:29 by snorton.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: JadedFaded ()
Date: August 28, 2021 07:50

All the lovely posts here, the photographs, the links to videos and articles, all the tributes to Charlie, they all provide some comfort, and I am so grateful for this wonderful forum filled with so many people with such love for our favorite band.

Growing up, I fell hard for the Stones. My friends liked the Stones, but not in the all-consuming way that I did. As an adult, again, none of my friends were Stones fanatics. I mostly went to Stones concerts on my own. Over the years, I have met some great people at concerts and developed ongoing friendships with them, even though we live in different countries and in different parts of the United States. Stones friendships are special friendships.

My family and my non-Stones friends have never understood why I tried to go to as many Stones concerts as I could. It’s been well over 50 shows, and I am cherishing every one of those shows because I got to be “with” Charlie Watts each time. What a blessing that is!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: GivenToFly15 ()
Date: August 28, 2021 10:40

The French magazine Télérama (see above for the tribute) also republished a nice No Security-era (dec 1998) interview of Charlie.

[www.telerama.fr]

Pilier des Rolling Stones, Charlie Watts est mort ce mardi 24 août à l’âge de 80 ans. Rare en interview, il avait accordé un long entretien en 1998 à “Télérama”, pour la parution de “No security”. L’occasion de revenir sur sa place au sein des Stones, de son amour pour le jazz ou encore de sa carrière sur fond de sexe, drogues et rock’n’roll.

Article initialement publié dans Télérama en décembre 1998

Le tambour-major des Rolling Stones est un personnage peu ordinaire. Inconditionnel de jazz, Charlie Watts déteste le rock, ce qui ne l'empêche pas, depuis trente-cinq ans, de battre la mesure du plus grand groupe du monde. Les coups de semonce de Satisfaction, c'est lui. Tout comme les roulements trépidants de Get off my cloud, la frappe cinglante de Paint it black ou le rythme syncopé de Miss You. Trente-cinq années pendant lesquelles il a vécu de l'intérieur une folle épopée, avec son lot de drames, de tournées géantes et d'hystérie collective, sur fond de sexe, drogues et rock'n'roll. Une existence aux antipodes des aspirations de cet homme né en juin 1941 à Londres, et qui exerçait, jusqu'à sa rencontre en 1962 avec Brian Jones, la paisible profession de dessinateur publicitaire. Avare d'interviews (il a passé vingt ans sans faire une seule déclaration…), Charlie Watts s'exprime aujourd'hui à l'occasion de la parution de No security, le nouvel album « live » des Stones.

Depuis dix ans, vous êtes celui qui bénéficie de la plus longue ovation du public chaque fois que Mick Jagger présente les membres des Stones sur scène. Comment expliquez- vous cette popularité ?
C'est dû à la façon dont Mick me présente, non ? [Rires.] Ces ovations sont un immense compliment, mais je me garde bien d'essayer d'expliquer cette popularité. Si on commence à réfléchir à ces choses-là, on devient fou.

No Security a la particularité de présenter certaines chansons en version live pour la première fois.
Et alors ? Mick et Keith ont dû écrire environ cinq cents ou six cents chansons depuis les débuts des Stones. On puise naturellement dans ce vaste répertoire. En concert, il y a toujours une liste de morceaux que le public demande systématiquement. Si vous allez voir un concert de Ringo Starr, vous avez forcément envie de l'entendre chanter Yellow Submarine… Cela dit, nous essayons régulièrement de jouer des titres que nous n'interprétons que rarement, d'où la présence de Sister Morphine, Memory Motel, ou encore The Last Time.

Comment définissez-vous votre position au sein des Rolling Stones ?
[Long silence.] Ma position ? Celle de tout batteur : assurer la rythmique, maintenir la cohésion musicale entre chaque instrument et fournir une plate-forme aux autres.

Beaucoup de gens vous considèrent comme l'éminence grise du groupe, le Stone « sage »…
Sage, je ne crois pas. Disons plutôt intègre. Mais je ne me regarde jamais et je refuse d'analyser la façon dont les gens me perçoivent. C'est sans importance.

Quels sont vos rapports avec deux personnalités aussi fortes que celles de Mick Jagger et Keith Richards ?
Personne n'est plus proche de moi et j'ose espérer que la réciproque est vraie. Leurs personnalités sont ce qu'elles sont. Il faut vivre à l'intérieur de leurs sphères, suivre leur direction.
“Les Rolling Stones, c’est Mick et Keith. Tant qu’ils seront ensemble, les Stones existeront”

Aimez-vous autant les tournées qu'il y a vingt ou trente ans ?
Je suis incapable de me souvenir des années 60 ou 70 ! Toutes ces années passées sur la route ont fini par former un long et unique show. De notre dernière tournée, je n'ai retenu qu'une file interminable de valises et une foule de gens sans cesse en train de me dire où je dois aller et ce que je dois faire.

Et votre tout premier concert avec les Rolling Stones, au Flamingo Jazz Club de Londres, le 14 janvier 1963 ?
Aucun souvenir, si ce n'est celui d'avoir joué dans cet endroit avant d'avoir fait partie des Stones. Il faut que ce soit Keith, ou jadis Bill Wyman, qui me rappelle tel ou tel événement pour que je m'en souvienne vaguement. Par contre, je revois très bien notre première tournée anglaise, en 1963, dans les cinémas et les petits théâtres, quand nous partagions l'affiche avec les Everly Brothers, Bo Diddley et Little Richard. C'était merveilleux.

Durant trente ans, vous avez combiné votre jeu de batterie avec la basse de Bill Wyman. Son départ, en 1993, a-t-il modifié la formule rythmique du groupe ?
Il me manque énormément, même si nous sommes toujours en contact téléphonique. Mais sur scène, Darryl Jones [le bassiste remplaçant Bill Wyman, NDLR] est un musicien tellement doué et quelqu'un de si gentil qu'il m'est très facile de jouer et de tourner avec lui. Si nous avions aujourd'hui un bassiste à trop forte personnalité, ce serait insupportable. En tournée, il faut partager chaque instant vingt-quatre heures sur vingt-quatre pour donner deux heures de spectacle… Quant à savoir si Darryl Jones est meilleur ou moins bon que Bill Wyman, ça me semble un débat stérile. Chaque formation de Duke Ellington était unique, magique, pourtant aucun musicien n'était irremplaçable. Les Rolling Stones, c'est Mick et Keith. La force et l'essence du groupe reposent sur leur bonheur et leur longévité. Peu importe qui joue de la batterie ou de la basse avec eux : tant qu'ils seront ensemble, les Stones existeront.

Quelle est la partie de batterie dont vous êtes le plus fier ?
Peut-être celle de Not fade away, sur l'album live Stripped. Mais c'est difficile à dire car je n'écoute jamais les disques des Rolling Stones.

Dans son livre Stone alone, Bill Wyman écrit que vous êtes le seul du groupe à n'avoir jamais pris de drogue dans les années 60 et à être toujours resté fidèle à sa femme. Qu'est-ce qui a motivé cette attitude ?
Avoir toujours aimé ma femme inconditionnellement ! En fait, j'ai détesté les années 60 et 70. Je trouvais la musique de cette période épouvantable et j'avais beau être au coeur de l'action, je n'ai jamais vu de révolution. Seule la naissance de ma fille m'a rendu heureux. Toutes ces gamines hurlant durant nos concerts et le prétendu mode de vie « sexe, drogues et rock'n'roll » m'ont toujours paru ridicules et malsains. En ce qui concerne la dope, je me suis rattrapé au cours des années 80 en prenant des tonnes de poudre. J'en ai été le premier surpris, ma femme n'a pas compris, mais le plus étonné, c'était Keith Richards ! Je n'avais plus goût à rien, je me méprisais, j'étais parti à la dérive à plus de 40 ans…

Imaginiez-vous faire une carrière aussi longue dans la musique ?
Pas du tout. Avant de faire partie des Stones, j'accompagnais divers artistes au gré des occasions. Au tout début des années 60, Alexis Korner m'a demandé de tenir la batterie au sein du Blues Incorporated. Ma rencontre avec lui fut déterminante : ce jour-là, je suis entré dans mon premier groupe et j'ai fait la connaissance de ma femme ! Alexis était un véritable catalyseur, doté d'un sixième sens pour dénicher des musiciens exceptionnels, comme Jack Bruce par exemple [futur membre de Cream, NDLR], contrebassiste, chanteur et compositeur surdoué. A l'époque, je n'avais jamais entendu le son d'un harmonica, et pour moi, le blues, c'était quand Charlie Parker était triste. Et voilà que Cyril Davies, un chanteur-harmoniciste, débarque de Chicago et se fait engager dans le groupe. Je n'avais pas la moindre idée de ce qui était en train de se passer… Toute la scène musicale anglaise a explosé grâce aux visions d'Alexis Korner. C'est alors qu'un p'tit gars quitte sa campagne de Cheltenham, une guitare sous le bras et un bottleneck au doigt. Il s'appelle Brian Jones, et la première chose qu'il fait en arrivant à Londres, c'est d'aller voir le Blues Incorporated en concert. C'est comme ça que je l'ai rencontré. Dans la mouvance d'Alexis, il y avait également un dénommé Mick Jagger, qui montait parfois sur scène pour chanter un morceau sous les yeux de son copain Keith Richards…

Vous dites ne pas aimer le rock'n'roll, ne jamais écouter les disques des Rolling Stones. N'auriez-vous pas préféré rester dessinateur de publicité ?
Non ! J'ai toujours voulu être batteur, mais j'étais persuadé de ne jamais pouvoir y parvenir. Mon rêve, c'était de devenir Kenny Clarke et d'accompagner les grands maîtres du jazz. Mais ça, c'est une autre paire de manches… Quand j'avais 17 ans, en 1958, je suis allé à Paris pour voir mon idole jouer avec Bud Powell, un pianiste génial, et Pierre Michelot, un bassiste qui avait accompagné Django Reinhardt. Ce monde était mon univers, et j'aimais ces musiciens. Dans le Paris des années 50, le jazz n'était pas, comme aux Etats-Unis, une musique réservée aux Noirs, c'est pourquoi votre capitale était à cette époque la Mecque des musiciens de jazz. Je me souviens qu'il y flottait un parfum très romantique, je me rappelle avoir rencontré Kenny Clarke à Saint-Germain-des-Prés, un homme flamboyant qui vivait une véritable romance avec Paris. Moi-même, j'avais l'impression de vivre dans un film de Fred Astaire.

Les Rolling Stones ont joué du blues, du rock, du rhythm'n'blues, de la soul, du disco, du reggae, mais jamais de jazz. Leur avez-vous suggéré de s'y essayer ?
Non, j'ai simplement conseillé à Mick d'inviter Joshua Redman à venir jouer sur Waiting on a friend lors de notre dernière tournée. Je lui ai également suggéré d'inviter Miles Davis sur certains de nos morceaux, mais malheureusement, ça ne s'est pas fait… Le seul musicien de jazz que Mick ait invité de son propre chef fut Sonny Rollins, lors de l'enregistrement studio, à Paris, de Waiting on a friend, en 1980. Sincèrement, je ne pensais pas que Rollins accepterait. Il l'a pourtant fait et en plus, il a adoré ! Ce fut un enchantement de pouvoir jouer avec celui que je considère comme le dernier géant du saxophone. En tant que simple auditeur, j'ai toujours préféré Sonny Rollins à John Coltrane, dont le succès a fait ombrage à de nombreux saxophonistes.

À force de jouer dans des endroits gigantesques, comme le Stade de France, n'avez-vous pas parfois l'impression d'être une bête de foire dans un grand cirque rock'n'roll ?
Plutôt une petite souris. Il s'agit d'un grand spectacle et mon rôle principal consiste à faire en sorte que Keith ait ses applaudissements. Et puis ces stades géants ne sont vraiment pas faits pour la musique. Tout cela, au bout du compte, n'est que de la comédie.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: August 28, 2021 10:57

"Les Rolling Stones, c'est Mick et Keith. La force et l'essence du groupe reposent sur leur bonheur et leur longévité. Peu importe qui joue de la batterie ou de la basse avec eux : tant qu'ils seront ensemble, les Stones existeront"

So that takes care of our "questions" about the future!

"Le seul musicien de jazz que Mick ait invité de son propre chef fut Sonny Rollins, lors de l'enregistrement studio, à Paris, de Waiting on a friend, en 1980. Sincèrement, je ne pensais pas que Rollins accepterait. Il l'a pourtant fait et en plus, il a adoré ! "

That's not what he said (recently to be fair), even CW could" wrong"!

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: NilsHolgersson ()
Date: August 28, 2021 11:00


Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Nikkei ()
Date: August 28, 2021 13:41

[www.spiegel.de]

translated: "Rolling Stones honour Charlie Watts with moving video collage"

It goes on to boast about "two minutes brimming of colourful life" and that way it drives home the point what a poor effort it actually is to cobble such a clip together. I get that Keith and Mick might be too shaken at this point to come out with something real, but these social media people are paid a full-time salary.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: chriseganstar ()
Date: August 28, 2021 14:16

[www.bbc.co.uk]
I lived in Dolton for 10 years from 1985 to 95 and met Charlie many times there. Always very supportive to the village, as is Shirley now.

Satisfied since 1976

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: dcba ()
Date: August 28, 2021 14:37

Quote
GivenToFly15
The French magazine Télérama (see above for the tribute) also republished a nice No Security-era (dec 1998) interview of Charlie.


“Les Rolling Stones, c’est Mick et Keith. Tant qu’ils seront ensemble, les Stones existeront”

Translation : "the Rolling Stones are Mick and Keith. As long as they're together, the Stones will exist".

I find it quite extraordinary that, 23 years ago, Charlie foresaw the future of the band... without him.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Davie137 ()
Date: August 28, 2021 14:50

Flowers at Charlie’s gate

[www.instagram.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 14:51 by Davie137.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: August 28, 2021 15:00

Quote
swiss
hey @MisterDDDD - hope you've been well smiling smiley Your posts of tributes seem majorly appreciated for so many people here. I'll probbaly come back and visit them in the future, and for now because I'm processing the way I tend to, I literally can't take in any additional info yet except what fans here on IORR and friends otherwise are posting - as you say, "the show must go on" is a great way to approach it all too -- whatever works for people -- no 2 the same. Take care -swiss

swiss~!!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MAF ()
Date: August 28, 2021 15:11


Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: with sssoul ()
Date: August 28, 2021 16:57

Quote
Ragnbert
I'm a bit proud of myself that I let him and his wife have a night out without fans disburbing them. Maybe others didn't think the way I did, but he was also a private person not only a Rolling Stone.

Smile: It's nice to read that someone else had the same instincts as me regarding Charlie's privacy. I've seen him on a few streets and in a café or two and proudly managed not to intrude. But I really felt the lack of a big sign saying "Charlie! Do you notice me not bothering you?"

One time after a show his minders were rushing him right by me on a side street, and I said "Thank you, Charlie!" He gave me a beautiful Charlie smile in return. That was lovely. I'd still be aglow from it if I weren't so effin' shattered.

We're blessed to have Charlie's rhythms in our bones.
Love & light to him, and thanks and praises.
I hope strength and comfort find his family and bandmates,
and all of us with broken hearts.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 17:28 by with sssoul.

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 28, 2021 17:06

Keith Richards
@officialKeef
·
27m
Charlie Watts, forever in our heart!

[twitter.com]

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: fzv98d ()
Date: August 28, 2021 17:35

My final pictures of Charlie and a video of Satisfaction in Miami.

[dustedtourdemichigan.blogspot.com]

Charlie Watts Final Concert

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: TimeIs ()
Date: August 28, 2021 18:03

Tne new twitter collages on Keith and the Stones' accounts are basically the collage posted on youtube by the Stones for Charlie's birthday in 2013. I just happened to be watching it last night by chance.

Still in shock and grieving hard like the rest of the Stones community. Like a lot of people here, the Stones are so monumental in my life since I became an immediate and obsessive fan at 14, and their history and music is so rich and deep, that it's hard to wrap your head and heart around it.

Thanks so much to BV for this forum and for everyone here sharing. It makes it just a little easier to know we're not alone and together both in our hurt and in the love we feel for this man and this band.

Ian from timeisonourside

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: August 28, 2021 18:29

Same George.. smileys with beer
I spent many years as a freight dispatcher.
If there was a trucker who rolled into the yard with this.. I wouldn't care much about their rates, they would get a ton of business winking smiley

Thought I read in one of the tributes that Charlie's father drove truck.
If true, imagine this must have put a smile on Charlie's face to see.

Quote
georgemcdonnell314
This is an awesome tribute!

I'd love to see this driving down the road.

Quote
StonedAsiaExile
Quote
MisterDDDD
Rolling Stones fan who drove trucks for band shares memories of late drummer Charlie Watts
ABC Radio Melbourne / By Madi Chwasta



If you thought you were the number one Australian fan of the Rolling Stones, think again.

Not only is John Abbott a self-confessed superfan — who says he has seen the band play live about 50 times — the well-known long-distance truck driver also commissioned an artist to paint three of his prime movers and a trailer with portraits of all the band members.

Mr Abbott told ABC Radio Melbourne that decorating one truck alone had cost him $25,000.

"On the driver's side was Keith Richards on the passenger door, Ronnie Wood [was] on the bed, [on] the windbreaker was Mick Jagger — and the whole back of the [cabin] was Charlie Watts and his drum kit," he said.

"People would say it looked incredible."



This is true love!

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: loog droog ()
Date: August 28, 2021 19:15

[www.yahoo.com]

Rockstars Have a Lot of Addictions. For Charlie Watts, It Was Bespoke Suits.
Josh Sims
Fri, August 27, 2021, 9:20 AM

William Dege, now in his sixties, recalls being at the family business, the Savile Row tailors Dege & Skinner, when he first saw Charlie Watts in the flesh.

“I guess I was around 12 at the time, but even then I was surprised to find this man just wandering around the cutting room, which, seeing as it was behind the scenes, was pretty odd,” he recalls. “He was looking intently at this Army Flying Corp service dress jacket — we were making a replica of it for him. And when he left the cutter turned to me and said, ‘That was Charlie Watts, the drummer with The Rolling Stones.’ I think I probably said, ‘Who’s that?’ But it struck me even then how very stylish he was.”

Of course, Charlie Watts, who earlier this week died aged 80, had the money to indulge his interests. But these were also very particular, the products in some sense of a bygone, more securely masculine, perhaps more proper age. They in flouted the usual signifiers of the radical cultural revolution that birthed his band: horses, classic cars, first editions, rare records and, of all the things that might embody the staid establishment butting up against rock ’n’ roll rebellion, tailored suits.

The eye for a sharp two-piece was a gift from his father Charles, who took Watts for his first trip to a tailor’s in London’s East End. And Charles junior ran with that gift.

“Watts’s love of tailoring was a kind of representation of how he stood out from the rest of The Rolling Stones in many ways, not indulging in the excesses of the times as they tended to either,” says Dege, who’s company also made suits for the likes of The Kinks and, later, David Bowie. “And I think with reassessment now he’s come to be regarded as something of a style icon.”

By his own admission, Watts always felt “totally out of place” in the group, in terms of “the way I looked. Photos of the band would come back — I’ll have a pair of shoes on and they’ve got trainers [sneakers]. And I hate trainers,” he once noted. Even on stage, while the rest of the band would raid the dressing-up box, Watts would be sat at the back in something precise, trim and Mod-ish. Forget loud, forget eccentric, forget — heaven forfend — jumpsuits. He was the rock ’n’ roller who never felt the need to literally wear it on his sleeve.

Certainly Watts, who reputedly owned at least 200 suits, from Huntsman, Tommy Nutter, Chittleborough & Morgan and other Savile Row greats, together with countless pairs of shoes, all bespoke-made by George Cleverley, wasn’t notable for his tailoring purely in contrast to Jagger, Richards, Wood and Wyman. He wore it well of his own accord, standing out even when the other Stones dabbled in suiting for fashion’s sake — most famously, perhaps, when Jagger and his then wife Bianca wore matching white suits for their Studio 54 outings.

But then Watts had a template to reference. Always at heart a jazz drummer, Watts had the likes of Buddy Rich, Art Blakey and Gene Krupa’s similar high regard for good tailoring as his inspiration (while conceding some incredulity at how any of them actually played in a suit), with his love of the golden, pre-war age of Hollywood providing additional source material. He loved a contrast or pin-collared shirt. Check out how the color of his socks always — always! — echoed that in his shirt, too.

Watts called his taste “old-fashioned.” But it was more that he was faster than most to realize, as he once explained, that “when you get to my age … what works on a young boy won’t quite work on me. People don’t give the time or thought [to dressing well] anymore. It’s a bit of a lost world.” There’s little surprise that Watts never understood why anyone would use a stylist and have a look imposed by some stranger.

“What’s remarkable is how dedicated he was to tailoring,” argues Simon Cundey, CEO of Henry Poole, Savile Row’s oldest tailoring house. “Given the chaos of the 1960s and 70s, with the band overwhelmed by designers trying to get them into the most outrageous dress, Watts was all sartorial elegance. And somehow he managed to maintain that position. I’d often see him coming down the Row, always chauffeur-driven — I always thought it was strange how a man so into cars never learned to drive himself — and his driver always looked impeccable too.”

Watts made his sartorial mark most definitely in a double-breasted suit, a style — again, with period overtones — that turns most men into lost extras from Wall Street, or which only goes to emphasize their portliness. But small and always slender, with square shoulders, Watts’s frame allowed the double-breasted suit to hang perfectly.

“I think there are a lot of men still trying to model themselves on Watts’s preference for a double-breasted suit, and not all successfully,” laughs Cundey. “But while Watts had an exquisite love of detail, he was ready to gently bend the rules in tailoring too — to make a lapel just a little bit wider than it might usually be, for example — while still loving the tradition of it all.”

Indeed, Watts once opined on the hugely controversial subject of whether one should ever request a notch in the lapel of a double-breasted suit. That might make it interesting, but it was also out of kilter with the right way of doing things. He wouldn’t respect a tailor that let him make such a monstrous sartorial blooper.

“What was great about Charlie Watts was not just that he loved a suit, but that he was also a great advocate for Savile Row, appreciating the history, the culture, the differences of each house and each cutter within each house too,” says tailor Richard Andersen, ex of Huntsman and now of his own eponymous tailoring firm, who met Watts several times over the course of his career. “What really came across was that tailoring was a real joy for him. He gravitated towards the classic, but he always wanted to give some subtle kind of rock ’n’ roll quality to it. Savile Row is at its best when it cuts a suit to work with a certain personality. And Charlie Watts had personality in spades.”

Re: Charlie Watts Dies at 80
Posted by: Javadave ()
Date: August 28, 2021 19:30

Phish opened their three night run at The Gorge Amphitheater in Washington last night with Torn and Frayed. They have done a complete cover of EOMS before for one of their “Halloween Costumes”, so this isn’t terribly surprising, although Loving Cup is the song from that album that had remained a regular feature in their revolving set lists. Torn and Frayed was a somewhat more sincere and inspired choice.

Pro-shot video from last night. Torn and Frayed starts around the 1:25 mark:

[m.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2021-08-28 19:48 by Javadave.

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