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Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Sipuncula ()
Date: July 13, 2019 09:58

Quote
noughties
ronnie`s goofing

Is it true? I think I`ve heard about it. The current picture at this site`s home page possibly shows this.

I highly doubt he is on the sauce (or whatever) again.

There. I correctly interpreted the insinuation of the original post. Let's move on.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: paulywaul ()
Date: July 13, 2019 10:09

Quote
SomeGuy
bv, of course. Everyone here appreciates your efforts on this site. That's why we come here every day!

Amen ! The best RS site by ..... yards, miles, kilometres, or any other unit of measurement.

Er umm ... furlongs, leagues etc. Can't think of any others right now !

[ I want to shout, but I can't hardly speak ]

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: stone4ever ()
Date: July 13, 2019 10:23

Quote
jlowe
Quote
MisterDDDD
Quote
HMS
Was Bill Wyman ever accused of "goofing around"?

Onstage?? No winking smiley

I don't think Keith is a goofer either.

Suprisingly, another Quiet One, George Harrison goofed around on stage when he was in the company of assorted Bonzos and Pythons.
But not when he was with Mr McCartney.

I think Keith's moves ( when he used to make them ) were seen as cool rather than goofing around imho.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Date: July 13, 2019 11:02

<Is it true? I think I`ve heard about it?>

Was that a joke? Everyone who has attended a Stones-show has seen Ronnie goofing and clowning around at times. It's been part of their act since 1975 smiling smiley

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Chris Fountain ()
Date: July 13, 2019 14:50

Quote
DandelionPowderman


Was that a joke? Everyone who has attended a Stones-show has seen Ronnie goofing and clowning around at times. It's been part of their act since 1975 smiling smiley


Remembering the Faces in concert in the early 70s: Ronnie would walk out on stage with drink in hand. Wow - Angel was always the last song played at their concerts. Yep Ronnie would clown around the entire concert. I'm not saying he had a clown car, but he was just fun and good natured. Just like today.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: grzegorz67 ()
Date: July 13, 2019 14:55

Quote
Chris Fountain
Quote
DandelionPowderman


Was that a joke? Everyone who has attended a Stones-show has seen Ronnie goofing and clowning around at times. It's been part of their act since 1975 smiling smiley


Remembering the Faces in concert in the early 70s: Ronnie would walk out on stage with drink in hand. Wow - Angel was always the last song played at their concerts. Yep Ronnie would clown around the entire concert. I'm not saying he had a clown car, but he was just fun and good natured. Just like today.

You beat me to it. Here they are on BBC Top of the Pops in 1973. Love how Ronnie is so instantly recognisable thumbs up

[m.youtube.com]

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: wonderboy ()
Date: July 13, 2019 15:00

I would theorize that Ronnie's 'goofing' or general devil-may-care front is partly a way to deal with anxiety or pressure. Now that he's sober he probably has other ways to deal with that. Also I sense from the vids I've seen from this tour that he is keeping a close watch on Keith.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Chris Fountain ()
Date: July 13, 2019 15:13

It is amazing how he played so effortlessly great back then. Good to see him at that level on this tour.

Yeah- even when things seem great there are always obstacles. But the answer is a positive attitude. Ronnie has that. Right ! Change the dynamics ! Life is short!

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: noughties ()
Date: July 14, 2019 17:27

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Was that a joke? Everyone who has attended a Stones-show has seen Ronnie goofing and clowning around at times. It's been part of their act since 1975 smiling smiley

-Erm.., a joke? -Eh, I only had a fragmentary knowledge of this and was not sure.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Date: July 14, 2019 17:35

Quote
noughties
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Was that a joke? Everyone who has attended a Stones-show has seen Ronnie goofing and clowning around at times. It's been part of their act since 1975 smiling smiley

-Erm.., a joke? -Eh, I only had a fragmentary knowledge of this and was not sure.

So you really started a thread, asking whether it was true if Ronnie ever goosed around on stage? You've never seen it? Not on Hampton, LSTNT (the film) or on a show you've attended yourself?

Well, I've have to take your word for it smiling smiley

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: bv ()
Date: July 14, 2019 17:37

So to completely understand the term "goofing", Bill Wyman never did any "goofing" on stage, right? And Darryl is goofing a lot more than Bill ever did, I think I am getting the hang of it now.

Bjornulf

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: grzegorz67 ()
Date: July 14, 2019 18:05

Bill always said he would move when Charlie moved winking smiley

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Sipuncula ()
Date: July 14, 2019 18:07

Quote
bv
So to completely understand the term "goofing", Bill Wyman never did any "goofing" on stage, right? And Darryl is goofing a lot more than Bill ever did, I think I am getting the hang of it now.
Bjornulf:


The term "goofing", in the parlance of our times, could mean a couple of things, depending on context: 1)to act silly or 2)to stay off task wasting time. I could see how people could use it to mean "stoned" as well. That is what I thought the original poster meant but now I'm not so sure.

Now while your examples could apply to the above constructs, you could also mean "walking" or "moving" as you posted before. Perhaps the term should be more narrowly applied to avoid confusion. I noticed you wisely left out Mick Taylor. Could he be considered to be "goofing" by any definition?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-07-14 18:08 by Sipuncula.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: bv ()
Date: July 14, 2019 18:28

Mick Taylor did some times lie down on stage, at his solo shows, then he just kept on playing. It was a weired stage thing, but I got used to it, he never did that with the Stones, as far as I remember. Then he did that, from memory, at the first O2 show in 2012, I was surprised, same with Mick J, it is like taking off your shirt, not even Mick is doing that these days, I mean the last shirt.

I like the way the Stones band members act on stage these days. Everyone is sober, focused, themselves, some times Mick introduce "on bass Chuck Leavell", some times Keith start "Rambler" when it should be Paint It Black, some times Keith don't want to join Ronnie and Mick out to the B-stage, some times Ronnie is performing for the camera on his side, and Charlie seems to be enjoying life at his fixed position, having a great smile from what the band members in front of him are doing at times.

Bjornulf

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: paulywaul ()
Date: July 14, 2019 19:20

Quote
bv
So to completely understand the term "goofing", Bill Wyman never did any "goofing" on stage, right? And Darryl is goofing a lot more than Bill ever did, I think I am getting the hang of it now.


Bjornulf,

One of the characteristics of the English language that presents real difficulties for learners (or non-native speakers), is that it is very rich in phrasal verbs. A phrasal verb is a two word (sometimes a three word) verb that is made up of a primary verb - plus a preposition. In combination, these words form a 'phrasal verb'. The difficulty stems from the fact that if you break the phrasal verb down to its component parts (i.e. the primary verb and the preposition/s) and consider each individual word's meaning, nine times out of ten you cannot work out what the complete phrasal verb actually means - because it makes no sense whatsoever.

Sticking with the subject matter of this thread, consider the verb 'to goof' !?

By itself, it means nothing. But stick a number of different prepositions after it, and all of a sudden - you have a phrasal verb. And each of those has a different meaning when used in a specific context.

To goof off. If you were talking about a workplace context for example, and someone said .... "that BV, he never does any work, he's always goofing off" - that would not be considered as very flattering to you. The meaning, as would be understood by a native speaker of English, would be that BV was unreliable at work, never getting things done on time, and generally not pulling his weight, wasting time, etc.

However, in a conversation (for example) between two people about how they choose to spend their leisure time, you might hear someone say ... "I don't do much, I just goof around really". That would generally be taken to mean that they don't make very productive use of their free time, they waste a lot of it and don't really do - or accomplish - much.

But used in a different context, goofing around (onstage with the Rolling Stones for example), can equally mean "playing around, messing around, being jovial and extrovert etc". In terms of meaning (at least to native speakers of the English language) - that is a whole world away from the first example (immediately above); i.e. being wasteful of time and unproductive.

Hope that helps. As good as your English is, there are some subtleties of the English language (no doubt this is true of all languages) that are truly difficult to get one's head around. Phrasal verbs - and there are thousands of them - are a nightmare. Native speakers don't think about them, they of course don't have to, but the poor sods that are trying to learn (or improve) the English language ... they generally find them a nightmare !

[ I want to shout, but I can't hardly speak ]

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: grzegorz67 ()
Date: July 14, 2019 20:34

Quote
paulywaul
Quote
bv
So to completely understand the term "goofing", Bill Wyman never did any "goofing" on stage, right? And Darryl is goofing a lot more than Bill ever did, I think I am getting the hang of it now.


Bjornulf,

One of the characteristics of the English language that presents real difficulties for learners (or non-native speakers), is that it is very rich in phrasal verbs. A phrasal verb is a two word (sometimes a three word) verb that is made up of a primary verb - plus a preposition. In combination, these words form a 'phrasal verb'. The difficulty stems from the fact that if you break the phrasal verb down to its component parts (i.e. the primary verb and the preposition/s) and consider each individual word's meaning, nine times out of ten you cannot work out what the complete phrasal verb actually means - because it makes no sense whatsoever.

Sticking with the subject matter of this thread, consider the verb 'to goof' !?

By itself, it means nothing. But stick a number of different prepositions after it, and all of a sudden - you have a phrasal verb. And each of those has a different meaning when used in a specific context.

To goof off. If you were talking about a workplace context for example, and someone said .... "that BV, he never does any work, he's always goofing off" - that would not be considered as very flattering to you. The meaning, as would be understood by a native speaker of English, would be that BV was unreliable at work, never getting things done on time, and generally not pulling his weight, wasting time, etc.

However, in a conversation (for example) between two people about how they choose to spend their leisure time, you might hear someone say ... "I don't do much, I just goof around really". That would generally be taken to mean that they don't make very productive use of their free time, they waste a lot of it and don't really do - or accomplish - much.

But used in a different context, goofing around (onstage with the Rolling Stones for example), can equally mean "playing around, messing around, being jovial and extrovert etc". In terms of meaning (at least to native speakers of the English language) - that is a whole world away from the first example (immediately above); i.e. being wasteful of time and unproductive.

Hope that helps. As good as your English is, there are some subtleties of the English language (no doubt this is true of all languages) that are truly difficult to get one's head around. Phrasal verbs - and there are thousands of them - are a nightmare. Native speakers don't think about them, they of course don't have to, but the poor sods that are trying to learn (or improve) the English language ... they generally find them a nightmare !

A good explanation PaulyWaul. Further complications arise depending on what version of native English is used. It’s the first language of the U.K. and Ireland, the US & Canada, Australia, New Zealand and more with many variations. It can get even trickier when a given word is widely used in 2 or more of said countries, and means something completely different in each, sometimes amusingly so grinning smiley

I’m a Scot life living in England and have never lived outside the U.K. though I’ve travelled around a bit. In the example you’ve used, I’ve never heard ‘goof off’ though I have heard ‘goofing around’.

For non native speakers of any iteration of the language, I do agree it must be a bit of a nightmare at times. A language can be learnt well in a structured and academic way but there’s no substitute for spending time in a country where it’s spoken and getting to know the quirks and nuances of a living breathing language.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: bv ()
Date: July 14, 2019 22:47

I do learn quite a bit of old style English language by watching old TV series like Aidensfield Arms or whatever it is called. The term "Under the weather" is great, it might feel like that here in New Orleans now, but I assume that is one of those statements you can't run through Google translate. I am completely sober, but rain du fall down.

Bjornulf

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: noughties ()
Date: July 14, 2019 23:51

The possibility of Ronnie being stoned was never on my mind.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: shadooby ()
Date: August 13, 2019 00:57

Quote
Koen
Quote
shadooby
FOR THE LESS TECHNICALLY INCLINED, PLEASE SOMEBODY POST THE PART FROM HAL ASHBY'S FILM WHERE RONNIE RUNS AROUND THE ROUND STAGE AND KEITH IS LOOKING FOR HIM......

What song is that in, and why are you screaming?

It's about 13:00 from the start of the film during Neighbours...oh, and pardon me but, BECAUSE I CAN!!!

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: noughties ()
Date: August 13, 2019 01:30

Quote
bv
I do learn quite a bit of old style English language by watching old TV series like Aidensfield Arms or whatever it is called. The term "Under the weather" is great, it might feel like that here in New Orleans now, but I assume that is one of those statements you can't run through Google translate. I am completely sober, but rain du fall down.

There is a Norwegian expression "Jeg har kommet under vær med at det har seg sånn eller sånn", which means that I have become aware of this or that.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Date: August 13, 2019 08:52

Under the weather means "sick", or not too good..

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Stoneage ()
Date: August 13, 2019 15:52

I think the goofing went down better with Rod (Sir Roderick). They were more alike. Funny-go-lucky. Didn't take themselves too seriously.

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Date: August 13, 2019 16:29

Quote
Stoneage
I think the goofing went down better with Rod (Sir Roderick). They were more alike. Funny-go-lucky. Didn't take themselves too seriously.

And Mick did that in 1975 or 1978? smiling smiley

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Stoneage ()
Date: August 13, 2019 16:34

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
Stoneage
I think the goofing went down better with Rod (Sir Roderick). They were more alike. Funny-go-lucky. Didn't take themselves too seriously.

And Mick did that in 1975 or 1978? smiling smiley

You're thinking of the SNL-lick? That's true, more goofing in the 70s then!

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Date: August 13, 2019 16:40

Quote
Stoneage
Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
Stoneage
I think the goofing went down better with Rod (Sir Roderick). They were more alike. Funny-go-lucky. Didn't take themselves too seriously.

And Mick did that in 1975 or 1978? smiling smiley

You're thinking of the SNL-lick? That's true, more goofing in the 70s then!

That, and the entire two first tours for Ronnie. He was goofed in! grinning smiley

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: dead.flowers ()
Date: August 14, 2019 15:26

Funny thread. But why not ask Ronnie himself about it?

In this interview here

Heavy Load: Ronnie Wood
By Ian Fortnam (Classic Rock) May 15, 2015 Classic Rock

[www.loudersound.com]

- in replying to the fourth question -

Ronnie himself says that he used to be "goofing around in the art lessons" when he went to school.

Cheers

d.f

"No reason to get excited ... "

Re: Ronnie`s goofing
Posted by: Stoneage ()
Date: August 14, 2019 15:48

There you have it, Dead Flowers. Proof!

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