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Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: June 9, 2019 19:29

Brad Wheeler of The Globe And Mail on his forthcoming interview:

Among other things, spoke to Mick Jagger about my favorite rock n roll book, The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones. On author Stanley Booth: "He was completely out of his mind, quite obviously. I mean, there were some entertaining bits in his book, but he's obviously crazy."

[twitter.com]

--

Not sure when piece will run.

[twitter.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-06-12 13:51 by bye bye johnny.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: DGA35 ()
Date: June 9, 2019 23:14

I remember when the book came out, Mick complimented it. IIRC, when asked about Stones books, he mentioned Stanley's book. He said at least he knows Stanley Booth and Stanley knows the Stones.
Great book about the 69 tour. Stanley is in the Gimme Shelter movie in the scene in the hotel room where they're listening to Brown Sugar.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: June 9, 2019 23:25



ROCKMAN

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 11, 2019 17:20

At last! Someone agrees with me!

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: June 11, 2019 18:40

Quote
Bliss
At last! Someone agrees with me!

about what?
grinning smiley

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 11, 2019 18:47

...about the value of Stanley Booth's book.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: June 11, 2019 19:11

Quote
Bliss
...about the value of Stanley Booth's book.

among Stones books its pretty good.. got a lot of praise from Keith and Mick, didnt it?

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: DaveG ()
Date: June 11, 2019 19:15

Quote
DGA35
I remember when the book came out, Mick complimented it. IIRC, when asked about Stones books, he mentioned Stanley's book. He said at least he knows Stanley Booth and Stanley knows the Stones.
Great book about the 69 tour. Stanley is in the Gimme Shelter movie in the scene in the hotel room where they're listening to Brown Sugar.

Isn't he also in the scene where the band is awaiting the helicopter with the Grateful Dead?

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: June 11, 2019 19:22

Along with Greenfield's book...one of the best.
Took 15 years to get published; you have to be patient in Stonesland.

Neither Author seems to written much of note since then or am I being unkind?
More 'casualties'?

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 11, 2019 19:50

Robert Greenfield wrote A Season in Hell about Nellcote about 10 years ago. Although the prose was very purple, I felt it really conveyed the atmosphere there at that time (edited: as conveyed in Exile).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-06-12 11:38 by Bliss.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: June 11, 2019 20:38

were you there, Bliss?

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 11, 2019 23:40

Quote
duke richardson
were you there, Bliss?

Not in 1971, no, but I was at Nellcote in mid-summer some years ago. I live not far from there :-)

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: June 12, 2019 13:55

Interview's been posted, but can only be read by subscribers:

He’s doing ‘very well, thank you’: Mick Jagger gears up for Rolling Stones summer tour as health improves

[www.theglobeandmail.com]

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Swayed1967 ()
Date: June 13, 2019 07:59

Quote
bye bye johnny
Brad Wheeler of The Globe And Mail on his forthcoming interview:

Among other things, spoke to Mick Jagger about my favorite rock n roll book, The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones. On author Stanley Booth: "He was completely out of his mind, quite obviously. I mean, there were some entertaining bits in his book, but he's obviously crazy."

[twitter.com]

--

Not sure when piece will run.

[twitter.com]

Wow. Completely unexpected since Booth is both a respected writer and to the best of my knowledge still fairly close to Keith. He is temperamental though, that’s for sure. Perhaps he made the mistake of asking Jagger for money at some point. At any rate, I doubt Stanley will be able to keep it in his holster if he gets wind of this jibe so we may see some fireworks soon. And if Keith weighs in this thread could have some legs.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: KRiffhard ()
Date: June 13, 2019 15:32

Quote
bye bye johnny
Interview's been posted, but can only be read by subscribers:

He’s doing ‘very well, thank you’: Mick Jagger gears up for Rolling Stones summer tour as health improves

[www.theglobeandmail.com]

I bet there aren't questions about the new album!!

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Deltics ()
Date: June 13, 2019 16:07

Quote
KRiffhard
Quote
bye bye johnny
Interview's been posted, but can only be read by subscribers:

He’s doing ‘very well, thank you’: Mick Jagger gears up for Rolling Stones summer tour as health improves

[www.theglobeandmail.com]

I bet there aren't questions about the new album!!

I managed a "right-click" on the page before the subscription log in appeared and managed to get this from the "page source" option.

"He’s doing ‘very well, thank you’: Mick Jagger gears up for Rolling Stones summer tour as health improves",
"After recently undergoing a ‘minimally invasive’ heart valve replacement procedure, the Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger says the band is upbeat about the upcoming No Filter tour of North America, scheduled for June 29",
Mick Jagger's heath issues caused a delay in the band's No Filter tour dates.
Almost 50 years ago, the Rolling Stones dedicated a free concert at London’s Hyde Park to the memory of founding member Brian Jones. The guitarist had drowned in his swimming pool two days prior, weeks after his exit from the band. The Stones decided to carry on with the concert, with Jagger quoting from Percy Shelley’s epic poem Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats as a eulogy for Jones. "Peace, peace, he is not dead,” the singer recited, as bunches of white butterflies fluttered free from cardboard boxes. “He doth not sleep.”

Two months after undergoing what was described as a “minimally invasive” heart valve replacement procedure, the 75-year-old Jagger doth not snooze either. On the phone from London, the upbeat singer told The Globe and Mail in a Canadian print exclusive interview that he’s doing “very well, thank you.” Taking a day off from rehearsing for the Stones’ upcoming No Filter tour of North America, which includes a festival-like show north of Toronto at Burl’s Creek Event Grounds on June 29, the son of a gym teacher was watching a French Open tennis semi-final and a World Cup cricket match between England and Bangladesh. He recalled the July 5, 1969 Hyde Park show fondly. “In my life, it’s a really landmark event. It was quite a beautiful afternoon in some ways.
Jagger’s recent heath issues caused the delay of most of the since-rescheduled No Filter dates. For his interview with The Globe, Jagger avoided specifics on the heart operation. He recently released a pair of post-procedure videos – one of him vigorously dancing; the other, enthusiastically rocking out on an amplified Fender Stratocaster – on social media, so as to broadcast, in the old Kremlin propaganda tradition, his vitality. Jagger was just as reluctant to provide details of what songs the band is rehearsing. “We’ve been doing a few deep cuts,” he said. “We’ll see.” It is a source of frustration for some long-time fans that the Stones today stick to a fairly rigid set list that includes some of the same warhorse material they played 50 years ago. Why not a chestnut from the catalogue? Something like the vamping funk of Slave, off 1981’s Tattoo You, perhaps. “I like that track,” Jagger conceded. “But it’s more or less an instrumental. I only get one line. It would give me a holiday,” he explained, laughing, “which is nice for me.” It’s a funny thing, balancing well-known songs with the less famous ones. The upcoming comedy film Yesterday imagines a world in which only one person, a musician, has any memory of the Beatles. With that in mind, what if Jagger arrived in a universe ignorant of Stones music? Which of their songs would he present first to people unaware of the band’s canon? “That’s a hard one,” he replied, mulling the question over. “I guess I’d have to play them Satisfaction. Then you’d play them You Can’t Always Get What You Want and then Honky Tonk Women and then Miss You. But I don’t know, really.”
On the subject of song catalogues and rock-music biopics, Jagger said he’d seen the Freddie Mercury story Bohemian Rhapsody but not the Elton John bio-musical Rocketman. “It’s a lot of fiction, isn’t it?” he suggested. “These films are a version of the truth.” Asked if he was interested in presenting his own truth, either in biopic form or an autobiography, the rocker was succinct: “Not really, no.” What about writer Stanley Booth, with his classic book The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones; did he get it right? “He was out of his mind, quite obviously,” Jagger answered. “It’s very entertaining, but I wouldn’t say it was true. It’s just his crazy point of view of being on our tour and being completely out of his box.” Booth’s book chronicles the Stones’ escapades of 1969, a year that ended with a disastrous concert at Altamont Speedway in Northern California (where a spectator was killed by a member of the Hell’s Angels) and the release of the album Let it Bleed. The summer had begun at Hyde Park, with the butterflies and the poetic requiem for a fallen Stone. Flowers, ruins, statues, music, words, are weak,” read Jagger, conspicuously dressed in a white smock, gloriously ruffled at the wrists and collar. "The glory they transfuse with fitting truth to speak.”
The truth that nobody likes to talk about is that the Stones’s performance that beatific day was ragged, and that many of the butterflies had suffocated from being enclosed too long. The concert ended with a satanic song about someone who’d “been around for a long, long year.” A half-century later, whatever deal the Stones and a stitched-up Jagger may have made with the devil seems to remain intact.


"As we say in England, it can get a bit trainspottery"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-06-14 14:01 by Deltics.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: tumbled ()
Date: June 13, 2019 16:27

the tail end of that article is kind of mean and leaves a bad taste in my opinion

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: June 13, 2019 16:34

Nice work, Deltics!

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: June 13, 2019 16:54

Quote
Swayed1967
Quote
bye bye johnny
Brad Wheeler of The Globe And Mail on his forthcoming interview:

Among other things, spoke to Mick Jagger about my favorite rock n roll book, The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones. On author Stanley Booth: "He was completely out of his mind, quite obviously. I mean, there were some entertaining bits in his book, but he's obviously crazy."

[twitter.com]

--

Not sure when piece will run.

[twitter.com]

Wow. Completely unexpected since Booth is both a respected writer and to the best of my knowledge still fairly close to Keith. He is temperamental though, that’s for sure. Perhaps he made the mistake of asking Jagger for money at some point. At any rate, I doubt Stanley will be able to keep it in his holster if he gets wind of this jibe so we may see some fireworks soon. And if Keith weighs in this thread could have some legs.

yes Stanley Booth wrote also a book I have, simply called 'Keith'.. about being with the Richards family years ago, good little book. I am sure he's not too worried about what anyone says now, including Jagger, about his work..

I'd like to know how he is.. does he still live in the Georgia sea islands area? i keep hoping that he'll publish something again.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Nikkei ()
Date: June 13, 2019 17:18

Thanks for sharing, but can that even be called an interview? Mick always used to be evasive but these are just the shortest, most meaningless answers he could possibly come up with. They have nothing to work with, so then it becomes about Brian and Hyde Park instead of Tour promotion.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Doxa ()
Date: June 14, 2019 13:58

Thanks, Deltics!thumbs up

A bit odd article (one cannot really call it an interview). Quite critical, even cynical tone in it (the line "in the old Kremlin propaganda tradition" is cool, though...), and the emphasis on 1969 events sounds a bit artificial and irrelevant. Like asking about one old book (Jagger's answer is apt). Anyway, the bit about "war horses" and about a hidden gem "Slave" sounded like any of us IORReans having written it...grinning smiley

What Mick makes obvious is that we will never hear "Slave" live...

- Doxa

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Date: June 15, 2019 02:32

Quote
duke richardson
Quote
Swayed1967
Quote
bye bye johnny
Brad Wheeler of The Globe And Mail on his forthcoming interview:

Among other things, spoke to Mick Jagger about my favorite rock n roll book, The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones. On author Stanley Booth: "He was completely out of his mind, quite obviously. I mean, there were some entertaining bits in his book, but he's obviously crazy."

[twitter.com]

--

Not sure when piece will run.

[twitter.com]

Wow. Completely unexpected since Booth is both a respected writer and to the best of my knowledge still fairly close to Keith. He is temperamental though, that’s for sure. Perhaps he made the mistake of asking Jagger for money at some point. At any rate, I doubt Stanley will be able to keep it in his holster if he gets wind of this jibe so we may see some fireworks soon. And if Keith weighs in this thread could have some legs.

yes Stanley Booth wrote also a book I have, simply called 'Keith'.. about being with the Richards family years ago, good little book. I am sure he's not too worried about what anyone says now, including Jagger, about his work..

I'd like to know how he is.. does he still live in the Georgia sea islands area? i keep hoping that he'll publish something again.

Would that be :Keith: Till I Roll Over Dead"?

It's been a while since I read it, but I recall a lot of factual mistakes. But it was entertaining for sure smiling smiley

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Title5Take1 ()
Date: June 15, 2019 12:26

Some précis Mick gives of the Booth book. This Booth interview >>>[www.telegraph.co.uk] <<< does prove him a crapulous sort.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 15, 2019 18:29

The problem with Stanley Booth's book was that he gave himself equal status to the Stones.He referenced himself a lot and it was quite intrusive. I do not want to hear about Stanley's love life.

He was in a unique position as an observer and biographer, given full access, and due to his ego, he sabotaged it.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: wonderboy ()
Date: June 15, 2019 19:39

Quote
Bliss
The problem with Stanley Booth's book was that he gave himself equal status to the Stones.He referenced himself a lot and it was quite intrusive. I do not want to hear about Stanley's love life.

He was in a unique position as an observer and biographer, given full access, and due to his ego, he sabotaged it.

The great thing about some of the early writers who wrote about the Stones was that they felt their were artists in their own right and felt themselves to be peers of the Stones. Sothern was a talented writer, a couple of years older than Keith (before Keith was an icon) and able to befriend him more or less as an equal. That's what made their work interesting.
More recent coverage of the Stones -- even in Scorcese's film -- is done by people who seemed awed or intimidated by the Stones legendary status.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: June 16, 2019 20:45

Presumably he is still working on his book on The Blues.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: June 16, 2019 21:04

Quote
wonderboy
Quote
Bliss
The problem with Stanley Booth's book was that he gave himself equal status to the Stones.He referenced himself a lot and it was quite intrusive. I do not want to hear about Stanley's love life.

He was in a unique position as an observer and biographer, given full access, and due to his ego, he sabotaged it.

The great thing about some of the early writers who wrote about the Stones was that they felt their were artists in their own right and felt themselves to be peers of the Stones. Sothern was a talented writer, a couple of years older than Keith (before Keith was an icon) and able to befriend him more or less as an equal. That's what made their work interesting.
More recent coverage of the Stones -- even in Scorcese's film -- is done by people who seemed awed or intimidated by the Stones legendary status.

Scorcese ruined SHINE A LIGHT.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: Bliss ()
Date: June 17, 2019 17:05

I had no problem with Spanish Tony or Bill German referencing themselves in their Stones biographies. I think it is because they did not come across as self-important. (Although it was rather pathetic that Tony dreamed of playing guitar with the band.)

Apart from a specialist music book, Stanley Booth was largely unknown at the time he wrote his book, and as such, he did not have commensurate artistic stature as the Stones.

Victor Bockris was a fairly well-known writer, and he kept himself scrupulously out of his Keith bio.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: June 17, 2019 20:25

Quote
DandelionPowderman
Quote
duke richardson
Quote
Swayed1967
Quote
bye bye johnny
Brad Wheeler of The Globe And Mail on his forthcoming interview:

Among other things, spoke to Mick Jagger about my favorite rock n roll book, The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones. On author Stanley Booth: "He was completely out of his mind, quite obviously. I mean, there were some entertaining bits in his book, but he's obviously crazy."

[twitter.com]

--

Not sure when piece will run.

[twitter.com]

Wow. Completely unexpected since Booth is both a respected writer and to the best of my knowledge still fairly close to Keith. He is temperamental though, that’s for sure. Perhaps he made the mistake of asking Jagger for money at some point. At any rate, I doubt Stanley will be able to keep it in his holster if he gets wind of this jibe so we may see some fireworks soon. And if Keith weighs in this thread could have some legs.

yes Stanley Booth wrote also a book I have, simply called 'Keith'.. about being with the Richards family years ago, good little book. I am sure he's not too worried about what anyone says now, including Jagger, about his work..

I'd like to know how he is.. does he still live in the Georgia sea islands area? i keep hoping that he'll publish something again.

Would that be :Keith: Till I Roll Over Dead"?

It's been a while since I read it, but I recall a lot of factual mistakes. But it was entertaining for sure smiling smiley

Bard, no it was called Keith: Standing in the Shadows. came out in 1995.

Re: Mick interview - The Globe And Mail, June 11
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: June 18, 2019 18:26

Quote
wonderboy
Quote
Bliss
The problem with Stanley Booth's book was that he gave himself equal status to the Stones.He referenced himself a lot and it was quite intrusive. I do not want to hear about Stanley's love life.

He was in a unique position as an observer and biographer, given full access, and due to his ego, he sabotaged it.

The great thing about some of the early writers who wrote about the Stones was that they felt their were artists in their own right and felt themselves to be peers of the Stones. Sothern was a talented writer, a couple of years older than Keith (before Keith was an icon) and able to befriend him more or less as an equal. That's what made their work interesting.
More recent coverage of the Stones -- even in Scorcese's film -- is done by people who seemed awed or intimidated by the Stones legendary status.

Then of course there was Truman Capote who came onto along for the 1972 your, for the purposes of writing an article on The Stones.
I don't think that happened as he thought the music pretty naff and the whole scene around group pretty awful.
Still, he probably enjoyed some benefits of being a VIP guest.

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