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Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 18, 2017 18:13



Long View Farm, September 1981

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 18, 2017 18:27



Listed as San Francisco 10/17. Does this look like the roof to Candle Stick Park?













photos by Ken Friedman

Wolfgang's Vault

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 20, 2017 07:05




  1/2/1982-Washington, DC - ORIGINAL CAPTION READS: 

   Mick Jagger belts out a song during the concert. 
   Because of his triumphant concert tour, 
   'People Magazine' includes Mick in its list 
   of 'The 25 Most Intriguing People of 1981.' 
   The magazine dubs him 'Rock's Croesus' and 
   reports that Jagger's current reading material 
   is a biography of financier Bernard Baruch.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 20, 2017 07:20




NEW YORK, NY - 1981: Bianca Jagger and Roy Halston at
the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute Gala.
photo by Robin Platzer





Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-20 07:21 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Pecman ()
Date: February 21, 2017 02:13

The back of Van Halen's cover to Diver Down was shot at the Orlando show
when they opened up for the Stones. Looks like the crowd was going crazy for Van Halen. Was anybody at that show?

Pecman

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 21, 2017 05:05

                   Mick Jagger & Jerry Hall
                     by Norman Parkinson
                          July 1981




   


 
Mick Jagger & Jerry Hall by Norman Parkinson, July 1981, Norman Parkinson Archive


 



                          







 



                          


 


 Norman Parkinson






 








Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-21 06:41 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 21, 2017 19:11



 




   


 





        
Exibit: Norman Parkinson's Century of Style at The National Theatre, March 7, 2013, London.       photo by Norman Parkinson
photo by Dave M. Benett

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 22, 2017 07:15

Quote
Pecman
The back of Van Halen's cover to Diver Down was shot at the Orlando show
when they opened up for the Stones. Looks like the crowd was going crazy for Van Halen. Was anybody at that show?

Pecman


Thanks for the info!




ORLANDO



Van Halen: Diver Down (1982)







This legendary photo was taken Oct. 25th, 1981, during the second and final performance at the Tangerine Bowl in Orlando,
Florida. Van Halen performed the last two show of their Fair Warning tour here, opening for the Rolling Stones.

Commemorate Van Halen's legendary Fair Warning tour by owning a large print of this iconic photo - the same photo that was used
in the inside cover of Van Halen's Diver Down album.

- See more at: [www.vanhalenstore.com]



The Rolling Stones in the fall of 1981 were touring behind their new single “Start Me Up” from their #1 album,
Tattoo You, released that August. It would be the largest Stones tour to date, breaking ticket sale records and
raking in millions.

Van Halen was simultaneously on the road, winding down their Fair Warning tour, supporting their fourth album, and were
asked by the Stones to open for them at their Oct 24th date at the Tangerine Bowl (also known as the Citrus Bowl or
the Orlando Stadium) in Orlando, Florida. A huge stadium show would be a fitting way to cap off their sold out North

American tour, which began in May, so they jumped at the chance. This show was to be the final show of their 1981 tour,
and would also mark the second and last time these bands would ever share the same stage. (The first was when Van Halen
opened for the Stones in New Orleans 1978).


The iconic black and white photograph of Van Halen in front of the ocean of people at the Tangerine Bowl was used on
the back of their next LP, Diver Down. You can purchase a photographic print of that Oct 25th, 1981 shot












Orlando_1981_Van_Halen_19. Orlando_1981_Rolling_Stones. Rolling_Stones_Van_Halen_shirt_Orlando_Florida_Tangerine_Bowl_1981






Below was the biggest thing to hit Orlando since Disney opened in 1971 when the ROLLING STONES picked Orlando and the
Tangerine Bowl for their 2 concerts in 1981. Only shows in Florida that year by the Stones on that tour...a HUGE get for
Orlando over larger stadiums in Jacksonville, Tampa and Miami at the time. Opening acts were Henry Paul Band and VAN HALEN!




A ticket stub for a concert featuring The Rolling Stones at the Tangerine Bowl in Downtown Orlando on October 25, 1981.

The ticket was $15.60, including tax, and the show began at noon, with the doors opening at 9 a.m. The concert was promoted
by Cellar Door Productions and Beach Club Productions. The Tangerine Bowl has been also known as Orlando Stadium,
the Citrus Bowl, Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium and is currently known as Orlando Citrus Bowl Stadium. It opened in 1936
and has been home to numerous sporting and entertainment events throughout its existence.


ORLANDO





Above photo, 24 October 1981 Orlando Tangerine Bowl (Hi Britney ;-)



Mick - lavander jacket, yellow shirt, blue belt/sash, navy blue knee pads white socks

Keith - white t-shirt, blue jeans

Ron - maroon shirt, black leather pants, round sun glasses, maroon Nike sneakers, wristwatch on right arm

Bill- yellow suit, white shirt, no tie

Charlie - wide-stripped purple and blue shirt




Here's what the 76 year old Citrus Bowl looks like today:









Edward VanHalen fingertaps his way through a solo at the Tangerine Bowl in Orlando
on 24 or 25 October 1981 while opening for the Rolling Stones.

Photo Credit: Richard E. Aaron

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Date: February 22, 2017 10:54

Amazing - I must have said this 10 times already about this thread. Never seen the Van Halen pics of the Stones gig. In their prime.
As essential as Michael Anthony's sound and esp. his BU vocals were to the band, he just never quitre looked as cool as the other 3.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: shattered ()
Date: February 22, 2017 18:02

I was wondering if there were any more snaps of this Orlando show and then you post the pictures! smiling smileyThanks exilestones.smiling smiley

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 22, 2017 19:00

Quote
Palace Revolution 2000
Amazing - I must have said this 10 times already about this thread. Never seen the Van Halen pics of the Stones gig. In their prime.
As essential as Michael Anthony's sound and esp. his BU vocals were to the band, he just never quite looked as cool as the other 3.



THE MIGHTY VAN HALEN recorded their 5th Studio Album “DIVER DOWN” at SUNSET SOUND in LA, January - March 1982.







Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Pecman ()
Date: February 23, 2017 04:37

Palace Revolution 2000,

I agree...Michael Anthony had no look whatsoever compared to the other three.

He always looked to me like a construction worker or lumberjack (no offense to anyone in those professions)...trying to look like a rock star.

He seemed to bulky and strong compared to the other members of Van Halen.

Pecman

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 23, 2017 07:44

                     NEW YORK CITY


                                  

                              November 12, 1981



  NEW YORK CITY


          

  November 13, 1981


              

                                         Keith Richards and photographer, Ann Clifford 1981, NYC



  
                                                Keith Richards, Ron Galella (r) 1981, NYC


     
NYC Paparazzi - Ron Galella, David McGough

[www.davidmcgough.com]




  
Jade Jagger in New York City 1981                              Bianca and Andy at a fashion show, April 27, 1981, NYC



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-23 07:55 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Pecman ()
Date: February 23, 2017 22:50

Exilestones,

Oh My God...I was at the Nov 13th show...never seen any pictures of it until
this thread.

The fourth picture to the right of the Nov 13th pictures is taken from
exactly where I was seated...(without an actual seat)...at the bottom of
the stairs in the old RED Section at the tip of the stage.

I will never forget that show!

Thanks so much man...It's great to see these pictures!

Pecman

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 06:44

Quote
Pecman
Exilestones,

Oh My God...I was at the Nov 13th show...never seen any pictures of it until
this thread.

The fourth picture to the right of the Nov 13th pictures is taken from
exactly where I was seated...(without an actual seat)...at the bottom of
the stairs in the old RED Section at the tip of the stage.

I will never forget that show!

Thanks so much man...It's great to see these pictures!

Pecman


I kept looking for some more photos for you. I'm glad you enjoy them.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 07:57

A.R.M.S. CONCERTS 1983



                 






Ian Hunter of Mott The Hoople and Pete Townshend of The Who backstage at the Ronnie Lane 
ARMS Benefit Concert at Madison Square Garden in New York City.





Joe Cocker performing at the Ronnie Lane Arms Benefit Concert 
at Madison Square Garden in New York City on December 8 1983.



 
Jeff Beck performs as part of the ARMS benefit for 
Multiple Sclerosis at the Cow Palace on Dec 1 1983.





            Jan Hammer playing a keytar and Jeff Beck performing 
              at the ARMS benefit concert at the Cow Palace in 
                     San Francisco on December 3 1983.



Hall of fame guitarists Bill Wyman, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck perform onstage at the ARMS 
(Action in Research for Multiple Sclerosis) benefit concert at the Los Angeles Forum on December 6, 1983. 
photo by Marc S Canter




Jimmy Page and Paul Rodgers performing at the ARMS benefit concert at the Cow Palace.


  
Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman (far right) are enjoying a moment during the final bow at the ARMS Concert 
                 at Royal Albert Concert Hall in September 1983.

Filmed during the A.R.M.S. Charity Concert, that took place at the Royal Albert
 Hall, London in September 1983, Eric Clapton leads a star-studded performance
 of “Layla” featuring; Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Steve Winwood, 
Andy
 Fairweather-Low, Bill Wyman, Kenney Jones and Charlie Watts.

The show’s abbreviated titles stood for; Action into Research for Multiple 
Sclerosis and was put together by Ronnie Lane, the ex-bassist for The Small 
Faces and The Faces, who himself had suffered from the condition.

Although initially planned to be just a one off show, due to the overwhelming
 success, subsequent dates occurred in the United States, but with slightly
 different lineups.

The London show was particularly notable for the fact that it was the first time
 Clapton, Beck and Page, (all former lead guitarists for The Yardbirds), 
had performed together on stage.

Earlier in the evening, Jimmy Page performed a rare solo instrumental version of
 Led Zeppelin classic “Stairway to Heaven” which can be seen in the second of
 the two clips below.

[www.youtube.com]

[www.youtube.com]

[www.youtube.com] full show


Paul RODGERS and Ronnie LANE and Andy FAIRWEATHER-LOW and Bill WYMAN and Eric CLAPTON and 
Jeff BECK and Jimmy PAGE and Joe COCKER and Kenney JONES; L-R: Paul Rodgers, Kenney Jones, 
Joe Cocker, ?, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Ronnie Lane, Eric Clapton, Bill Wyman, Andy Fairweather-Low 
at Ronnie Lane ARMS Benefit concert. 
photo by Richard E. Aaron



 Bill Wyman and Ronnie Lane perform on stage during an ARMS Charity Concert, 
Dallas, Texas, November 27, 1983. 
photo by Paul Natkin


  
Eric Clapton, Joe Cocker, Jeff Beck, and Bill Wyman perform at an ARMS Charity Concert, 
Dallas, Texas, November 27, 1983

photos by Paul Natkin



immy Page, Charlie Watts, and Joe Cocker perform on stage during an ARMS Charity Concert, 
Dallas, Texas, November 27, 1983.

photo by Paul Natkin





  
An all-star lineup performing on stage at a charity concert for ARMS (Action into Research for Multiple Sclerosis), held at the Royal Albert Hall, London, 20th September 1983. 
Left to right: Steve Winwood (keyboards), Andy Fairweather Low (standing in front of Jimmy Page), Kenney Jones (drums), Eric Clapton, Charlie Watts (drums), Bill Wyman and Jeff Beck. 


  

                  


photos by Michael Putland



  


  
Bill Wyman, Eric Clapton, Ronnie Wood, Jeff Beck, Ronnie Lane December 8, 1983 A.R.M.S.  benefit concert at Madison Square Garden.
December 8, 1983 at Madison Square Garden



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-24 08:11 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 08:38

I was at the ARMS Concert in New York City. It was great to be there with many rock legends! The highlights for me was to be there with Bill, Ron and Charlie.

In the 1960's it was often asked, "who is better, the Beatles or the Stones?" In the 1970's it was Led Zeppelin or Stones rivalry among fans. Jimmy Page was quite the rage. I could see the reason why. Jimmy was the second highlight for me.

My buddy Matt flew in from Chicago to see the show. He was a huge Led Zepp fan. I believe this was the first time Jimmy Page performed live since the end of Led Zeppelin in 1979. Not many people I knew got to see Led Zeppelin since their tour kept getting cancelled part way through. I had seen them in 1977. This time there was a group of us in MSG.

Out came jimmy Page. It was great to see him. Page played his signature song "Stairway to Heaven." When it go to the part where the song explodes, Page stopped and looked around and smiled. The anticipation drove us nuts. It seemed like an hour long wait but it was probably only 30 or 40 seconds, then he hit those famous chords. Page stole the show in New York City.

















Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 17:53

   
    Bill Wyman and Jeff Beck attend an Arms Concert on December 6, 1983 at the Westwood Marquis Theater in Westwood CA.

   photo Ron Galella

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: snorton ()
Date: February 24, 2017 17:53

I was at the San Francisco show.....to young and naive to realize what I was watching.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 17:54


ARMS Concert NYC 1983

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 18:11

Quote
snorton
I was at the San Francisco show.....to young and naive to realize what I was watching.

I feel the same way about watching the Stones play "Tops" in Philly 1981.
I remember thinking that I hoped they would play a fast song. Now I think
that song is great, with it's warts and all! That's one thy need to bring back
like they did with "Worried About You."

There were some great parts! This could be a great live song!


"Tops" in Philadelphia 1981:
[www.youtube.com]


"Tops" 1972
[www.youtube.com]


Keith and Mick Taylor on guitars in both versions.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-24 18:24 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 24, 2017 18:13

Quote
Pecman
Exilestones,

Oh My God...I was at the Nov 13th show...never seen any pictures of it until
this thread.


Pecman

There's more on page seven [www.iorr.org] .







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-02-27 05:34 by exilestones.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: snorton ()
Date: February 24, 2017 20:44

Quote
exilestones
Quote
snorton
I was at the San Francisco show.....to young and naive to realize what I was watching.

I feel the same way about watching the Stones play "Tops" in Philly 1981.
I remember thinking that I hoped they would play a fast song. Now I think
that song is great, with it's warts and all! That's one thy need to bring back
like they did with "Worried About You."

There were some great parts! This could be a great live song!


"Tops" in Philadelphia 1981:
[www.youtube.com]


"Tops" 1972
[www.youtube.com]


Keith and Mick Taylor on guitars in both versions.

I was referring to the SF ARMS show but I guess it also applies to me seeing the stones for the first time in SF as well.

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Pecman ()
Date: February 26, 2017 06:35

Best Thread Ever!

Pecman

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 26, 2017 08:44

KANSAS CITY



 

   

  

    

  

      



  

  

   Kent Meireis


++++++++++


BOOT CAMP: THE LAST TIME MICK TAYLOR SAT IN WITH THE STONES
November 26, 2012 by Scott Bernstein

Last night The Rolling Stones kicked off a celebration of their 50th Anniversary
 at the 02 Arena in London, where they filled the 23-song performance with 
rarities and guest spots. One of those guests was former Stones guitarist Mick 
Taylor who joined the band in 1969 before resigning in 1974. Yet yesterday 
wasn’t the first time Taylor performed with his old mates since he quit as he 
sat in for a large part of the Stones’ December 14, 1981 show at the Kemper 
Arena in Kansas City.



Taylor was in Kansas City for a gig with Alvin Lee leading to his guest spot at
 the Kemper. Ronnie Wood explained in his autobiography, “On the ’81 tour in
 Kansas City, we heard that Mick Taylor was in town we invited him up on stage
 for a few numbers. Perhaps the reunion over excited him. He seemed to refuse to
 realize how much the band had changed since his departure. He shocked us with
 how loud he was blasting it. Bulldozing through parts of songs that should have
 been subtle, ignoring the breaks and taking uninvited solos. And the volume! I

 thought me and Keith play loud, but he was easily three times louder than us.


 I was standing next to him, passing along messages from Keith who would say,

 ‘Tell that @#$%& to turn it down!’ I was a little more diplomatic: ‘Um, Mick,
 the song is finished’ or ‘It’s in E, not F.’ Afterwards, Keith told me, ‘It’s a
 good thing you were standing in between us or I’d have flattened him.’ But he’s
 a lovely man and it was great to see him.”


Taylor was in Kansas City for a gig with Alvin Lee leading to his guest spot at
 the Kemper. Ronnie Wood explained in his autobiography, “On the ’81 tour in 
Kansas City, we heard that Mick Taylor was in town we invited him up on stage 
for a few numbers. Perhaps the reunion over excited him. He seemed to refuse to
 realize how much the band had changed since his departure. He shocked us with
 how loud he was blasting it. Bulldozing through parts of songs that should have
 been subtle, ignoring the breaks and taking uninvited solos. And the volume! I
 thought me and Keith play loud, but he was easily three times louder than us. 
I was standing next to him, passing along messages from Keith who would say, ‘Tell
 that @#$%& to turn it down!’ I was a little more diplomatic: 
‘Um, Mick, the song is finished’ or ‘It’s in E, not F.’ Afterwards, Keith told me, ‘It’s a good
 thing you were standing in between us or I’d have flattened him.’ But he’s a 
lovely man and it was great to see him.”

Despite what Wood said, the soundboard recording that circulates tells a 
different story. When you can make out Taylor’s guitar licks, he adds to the 
songs, he doesn’t take away from them. Mick T. stayed on stage during a number
 of tunes from after his tenure in the group and he must’ve turned his volume
 down as you can’t hear his distinctive tone on those songs. Taylor especially
 shines on You Can’t Always Get What You Want.

[www.glidemagazine.com]












Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 27, 2017 05:33

THE POP LIFE; THE STONES ROLL ON, REFUSING TO BECOME SHOW-BUSINESS SLICK
By Robert Palmer
Published: November 4, 1981


THE Rolling Stones visited Atlanta for about five hours last week - just enough time to land their chartered jet, race into town to the Fox Theater, play a two-hour set, race back to the airport and take off for Houston, the next stop on their 1981 American tour. The tour is expected to be the most profitable in the history of rock-androll; its sheer size has been staggering. It began with the group's having to add a second show in Philadelphia's immense John F. Kennedy Stadium, which seats about 92,000, and will probably end with two shows at the New Orleans Superdome. The band's five shows in the New York area, which begin tomorrow night at the Brendan T. Byrne Sports Arena in New Jersey's Meadowlands, will accommodate a total of nearly 150,000. That looks like an impressive figure, but ticket requests for these shows ran into the millions.

Suddenly, everyone wants to see the Rolling Stones - their older fans are in their 30's and 40's, like the Stones themselves; their youngest fans are barely into their teens. ''The crowds were young, real young in Florida,'' Mick Jagger noted with evident relish as a makeup man applied pancake makeup to his face, a few minutes before the group was scheduled to go onstage in Atlanta. ''The front rows in Orlando were filled with these 12- or 13-year-old girls, some of whom were making the most unseemly suggestions.''

Fearful Parents of 60's

This is exactly what parents were afraid of back in the mid-60's, when a British newspaper asked, ''Would you let your daughter go out with a Rolling Stone?'' and magazines for teen-agers that ran features on the group regularly received answering letters from parents calling the Stones ''anti-Christs corrupting our children'' and that sort of thing. But this is 1981. The Stones have been rolling for nearly 20 years now, and although they have suffered some wear and tear, they have survived and prospered while their only real peers either splintered like the Beatles or burned out and found religion, like the born-again Bob Dylan. One reason they have pulled through is that they do not take themselves very seriously. ''You never know what to believe,' was Mick Jagger's response to a comment on the avalanche of ticket requests for the band's shows at Madison Square Garden and Byrne Arena. ''It may be three grandmothers in Queens sending in tons of ticket requests, for all I know.''

But of course the Rolling Stones' American following is much larger than ''three grandmothers in Queens.'' And what do they see, those who are lucky enough to get tickets to a Stones show? In Philadelphia, at the beginning of the tour, they saw a band that was rusty enough to make mistakes, like starting a song in two different keys and crashing to a halt, and loose enough to smile, make a joke and carry on. The Stones are much tighter now, in the second month of their tour, but they are still making mistakes.

These days, one rarely encounters a rock band that makes mistakes, unless the band is playing in a bar or a punk-rock club. Bands that sell millions of records and routinely perform in stadiums and arenas have honed their stage routines to slick, machinelike precision. Being this predictable is, of course, good business. It is a byproduct of big-time rock having moved out of the concert halls and theaters and into the sports arenas, where bands cannot afford to give too many poor performances. But to some rock-and-roll fans, usually the older, purist sort, rock-and-roll shows should include mistakes. Without mistakes, there are no surprises, and without surprises, this line of reasoning concludes, there is no rock-androll. There is something inferior - show business, mere entertainment.

''No, we're not slick,'' Mick Jagger said in Atlanta. ''We're still trying to be; making mistakes is embarrassing. But as far as us actually getting as slick as most of the bands playing today, I doubt we ever will. We've been trying for 20 years, and we haven't managed it yet.''

The opening shows of the Rolling Stones tour may have been raw, but they were not raw enough for some people. After the first show in Philadelphia, several of the band's employees, veterans of a number of Rolling Stones tours, gathered in a hotel bar to air their grievances. ''What're the boys up to?'' one wanted to know; after two decades, the five Rolling Stones are still ''the boys'' to their friends and co-workers. ''Asleep,'' said another fellow, contemptuously. ''Ah, it isn't like it used to be. Where's the madness, the insanity?'' The Unspoken Law

It is an unspoken but rarely questioned Rock and Roll Law that big-time rock tours are supposed to breed madness. Rolling Stones tours certainly do. Everybody who has been on one has a favorite madness story; this writer recalls an evening during the 1975 tour when the group checked into the Memphis Hilton at around 2 A.M. and were asked for a deposit on the dozens of rooms they had reserved by a panicky night manager. Peter Rudge, who was the tour's manic commander in chief, turned red and began screaming: ''So you want a deposit, eh? I'll show you a bloody deposit!'' He dashed outside to his limousine and returned a few moments later with a hefty leather briefcase, which he proceeded to open upside down over the hotel's front desk. The bag was full of money. Greenbacks filled the air, like a green tickertape parade, and drifted gently to the Astroturf carpet.''There,'' said Mr. Rudge, pleased with himself. ''There's your bloody deposit.''

That night, Keith Richards kept a number of the hotel's guests awake by playing his electric guitar into the early morning. Then he decided that rather than fly to Texas after the show on the band's rented jet, he would drive. He enlisted the Stones' other guitarist, Ron Wood, in this risky enterprise. Later that day, they were arrested in Fordyce, Ark., after a policeman saw their car fishtail uncertainly. They were put in the Fordyce jail, which was surrounded by teenagers as soon as the news leaked out. Lawyers began calling Fordyce from as far away as London, threatening dire consequences should Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood not be in Texas that night for the Rolling Stones' arena concert. An agreement was reached, a private plane was sent in and Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood made it to the show in Texas with minutes to spare. Now that was madness!

If the 1981 tour has been different, it is largely because Keith Richards is a different man. Once the most flagrant alcohol- and drug-abuser in the group, he has straightened up dramatically. He looks healthy, he is playing brilliantly and his backup vocals are often so lusty that they drown out Mr. Jagger, who is working harder to hold up his end of things as result. But when this writer arrived backstage at the Fox Theater in Atlanta, Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood seemed to be up to their old tricks. It was almost 9 P.M. and the opening act, England's Stray Cats, had almost finished their set, but Mr. Richards and Mr. Wood had not yet arrived at the theater. Mr. Jagger did not even know if they had arrived in Atlanta.

Jerri Hall, the model and actress who has been Mr. Jagger's steady girlfriend for several years now, burst into the dressing room, laughing. ''Keith and Ronnie just got here,'' she reported, ''and do you know what Ronnie did? He came trudging into the theater, carrying his bags, with his head down, eyes on the ground, and he trudged right out onto the stage! The Stray Cats were on. He looked up, noticed that there was a lot of light and a band playing, turned around, and trudged backstage again.'' She collapsed in giggles. ''Now that's professionalism,'' Mr. Jagger said, deadpan.

A terrible yowling became audible. In an adjoining dressing room, Keith Richards was waving a bottle and leading Mr. Wood, the keyboard player Ian McLagan, and the drummer Charlie Watts, among others, through a series of vocal-group imitations. This was no band of drug abusers; it was ''the boys'' having a boozy good time to psych themselves up for the show. Only Mr. Jagger, who has been very careful about his health during the tour, and the bassist Bill Wyman, who was standing in another room in an immaculate yellow stage suit, sipping at a drink, seemed to be above the fray.

The Rolling Stones finally began their set at the Fox Theater at 10:35 P.M., and although the audience had waited more than an hour since the end of the Stray Cats' performance, they soon seemed to forget their impatience. The band sounded magnificent. Mr. Jagger was improvising, reaching for notes that were not in the original melodies of Stones evergreens like the opening ''Under My Thumb'' and ''Let's Spend the Night Together.'' Mr. Richards, who used to stay close to his amplifier and microphone, was all over the stage, moving like a dervish and kicking off song after song with guitar rhythms that were utterly authoritative, always in the right tempo and the right groove.

Yes, there were mistakes. Mr. Richards would yell, ''I've got it,'' and take a guitar solo, only to find that Mr. Wood hadn't heard him and was soloing too. There were abrupt endings and missed cues. And none of this mattered at all. The band, raging like a forest fire, burned up 26 songs in less than two hours, yet every song got the attention it deserved; none was thrown away or walked through.

So this was the stuff the millions were clamoring to see. No wonder. The Rolling Stones' Atlanta show was one of the most exciting rock concerts I have ever seen, and the fans seemed to agree. By the time they had stopped cheering and begun to file out of the theater, the Stones were on their way to Houston.

NYTimes

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: Pecman ()
Date: February 27, 2017 06:46

Exilestones,

That picture that you posted is the exact angle I need to find myself in the crowd. I was just off the tip of the stage on Ronnie's side.

I can't blow that picture up for some reason.

I am going to contact AtlasIcons.com and see if they have more pictures
from that angle...If they do...I will definitely find myself in the crowd.

Can't thank you enough.

I owe you a Shephards Pie and a couple of Pints.

Pecman

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 28, 2017 06:46

NEW YORK CITY


















November 12, 1981





November 13, 1981

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: exilestones ()
Date: February 28, 2017 06:53



1982 unknown - any guesses?

Re: Stones 1981-1982 Wardrobes
Posted by: tomk ()
Date: February 28, 2017 07:22

Is the indoor stage in Kansas City, 1981, different than that other indoor stage?

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