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Re: Bridges to Babylon
Date: March 28, 2015 00:55

Quote
DoomandGloom
What's the song where they used Brian Jones' drum recordings from Tibet or somewhere else exotic? I worked a little on that song, merging the analog tapes with some of the prerecorded Brian stuff which they had transferred to a digital format. Everyone was very into the whole thing.

They hooked up with the same musicians rather than using Brian's recordings of them, I think.

Continental Drift.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-03-28 00:55 by DandelionPowderman.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: shadooby ()
Date: March 28, 2015 00:56

Seek out the original slip case version.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Testify ()
Date: March 28, 2015 00:57

Quote
mtaylor
Go out and buy it.

Favourites:

Already over me (anybody else than Stones playing - would have been a #1)

Low down great song, great grove

Saint of me - no need to mention.

Already over me could have been played live instead of Angie....

Low down sounds great live - with more practice....


Thank you for sharing this video, I had never seen. I did not know they played Low down live.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-03-28 01:01 by Testify.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Justin ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:04

This was remastered in 2009...never bothered to pick it up since I love the original 1997 mix. Any review on the difference between the two issues?

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: mtaylor ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:08

Quote
Testify
Quote
mtaylor
Go out and buy it.

Favourites:

Already over me (anybody else than Stones playing - would have been a #1)

Low down great song, great grove

Saint of me - no need to mention.

Already over me could have been played live instead of Angie....

Low down sounds great live - with more practice....


Thank you for sharing this video, I had never seen. I did not know they played Low down live.
They have, and so much great music they could have played more than this on a concert..... just a matter of playing and people getting used to the songs. Stones have a wonderful set of songs.... 50 years.... (the last 20 years not too active confused smiley)

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:12

Quote
bv
By the way, if you spend your time on a Stones forum, where fans of the Stones spend their time, and you wonder if you should invest something like 10 dollars or Euro on an original Stones album, and this band do only release like one album every five or ten years, and the cost of that album i.e. 10 dollars or pounds is the same as the cost of two or three beers, then I think you are fooling around here, really.

Oh no, honestly, I'm a huge hardcore fan! My question was more if I should use the money to buy a different stones album. I'm either going to get Voodoo Lounge or Babylon. But I noticed that a lot of people gave Babylon some pretty harsh reviews, so I thought maybe if Voodoo is a considerably better album, maybe I'd get that one first. It wasn't a question of ifI should get Babylon, but if I should get Voodoo first. I know I didn't mention Voodoo in this thread, it's because I had more questions about Babylon).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-03-28 01:24 by stones2000.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:14

Quote
TheBlockbuster
Quote
bv
By the way, if you spend your time on a Stones forum, where fans of the Stones spend their time, and you wonder if you should invest something like 10 dollars or Euro on an original Stones album, and this band do only release like one album every five or ten years, and the cost of that album i.e. 10 dollars or pounds is the same as the cost of two or three beers, then I think you are fooling around here, really.

Agree, I ran my old copy through a ''disc repair'' machine which scratched it to unplayable, so I bought a new copy for 3 Euros at a record fair. But I still admire the fact that stones2000 is about to buy this album instead of just grabbing the nearest torrent.

Thank you for that. Yeah, I always like paying for stones albums. Doesn't seem fair to cheat the band I love so much of their earned money.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: gotdablouse ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:19

Quote
alhavu1
Umm, it's just not. It's OK and overproduced like Steel Wheels PLUS they blew it as they had better songs they decide not to include

What "better songs" ? The rumored "Everchanging World" flipside? Those Karnbach mentioned in his book and that no one's ever heard?

--------------
IORR Links : Essential Studio Outtakes CDs : Audio - History of Rarest Outtakes : Audio

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:34

Quote
stones2000
Quote
bv
By the way, if you spend your time on a Stones forum, where fans of the Stones spend their time, and you wonder if you should invest something like 10 dollars or Euro on an original Stones album, and this band do only release like one album every five or ten years, and the cost of that album i.e. 10 dollars or pounds is the same as the cost of two or three beers, then I think you are fooling around here, really.

Oh no, honestly, I'm a huge hardcore fan! My question was more if I should use the money to buy a different stones album. I'm either going to get Voodoo Lounge or Babylon. But I noticed that a lot of people gave Babylon some pretty harsh reviews, so I thought maybe if Voodoo is a considerably better album, maybe I'd get that one first. It wasn't a question of if I should get Babylon, but if I should get Voodoo first. I know I didn't mention Voodoo in this thread, it's because I had more questions about Babylon).

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: kish_stoned ()
Date: March 28, 2015 01:45

go for it and get your rocks off one of the best one, you will love it all stones cds are good some better than others and depends on your taste too,my fave tacks are out of control,flip the switch,saint of me,might as well get juiced,too tight and how can i stop,overall all tracks are good,have fun and keep rocking to stones.
STONES ARE WAY OF LIFE.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 02:02

Quote
kish_stoned
go for it and get your rocks off one of the best one, you will love it all stones cds are good some better than others and depends on your taste too,my fave tacks are out of control,flip the switch,saint of me,might as well get juiced,too tight and how can i stop,overall all tracks are good,have fun and keep rocking to stones.
STONES ARE WAY OF LIFE.

Aw yeah!!

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Date: March 28, 2015 02:46

It's an amazing album - not enough credit is given to it. Out of Control is one of their best - and ought to be played live more than it is. Best one since 'Some Girls' IMHO.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: March 28, 2015 02:52

But I still admire the fact that stones2000 is about to buy this album instead of just grabbing the nearest torrent

Shhh. Don't give him any ideas, he's already concerned about a $10 investment. But I also respect those that support musicians by actually buying their product. smoking smiley

peace

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 03:11

Quote
Naturalust
But I still admire the fact that stones2000 is about to buy this album instead of just grabbing the nearest torrent

Shhh. Don't give him any ideas, he's already concerned about a $10 investment. But I also respect those that support musicians by actually buying their product. smoking smiley

peace

My question was more if I should use the money to buy a different stones album. I'm either going to get Voodoo Lounge or Babylon. But I noticed that a lot of people gave Babylon some pretty harsh reviews, so I thought maybe if Voodoo is a considerably better album, maybe I'd get that one first. It wasn't a question of if I should get Babylon, but if I should get Voodoo first.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-03-28 09:11 by stones2000.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: RomanCandle ()
Date: March 28, 2015 08:38

No one sees the difference between buying B2B and buying Exile or Let It Bleed? eye rolling smiley

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Naturalust ()
Date: March 28, 2015 08:58

Quote
RomanCandle
No one sees the difference between buying B2B and buying Exile or Let It Bleed? eye rolling smiley

Most probably see the difference and most have already worn through several copies of both of those. smoking smiley

I think there are 3 era's of Stones music: pre- Beggars Banquet, Beggar's Banquet to Emotional Rescue and everything after that. Each era picked up a sort of different type of fan, but once a fan of either two earlier eras you hang for the long run. Amazing to imagine but there are probably fans who started with GRRR. eye popping smiley

peace

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: RomanCandle ()
Date: March 28, 2015 09:07

Quote
Naturalust
Quote
RomanCandle
No one sees the difference between buying B2B and buying Exile or Let It Bleed? eye rolling smiley

Most probably see the difference and most have already worn through several copies of both of those. smoking smiley

I think there are 3 era's of Stones music: pre- Beggars Banquet, Beggar's Banquet to Emotional Rescue and everything after that. Each era picked up a sort of different type of fan, but once a fan of either two earlier eras you hang for the long run. Amazing to imagine but there are probably fans who started with GRRR. eye popping smiley

peace

eye popping smileyeye popping smileyeye popping smiley

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Doxa ()
Date: March 28, 2015 10:21

Oh I miss those days when there still were Stones albums I didn't have heard yet...grinning smiley

It doesn't matter in which order you buy them.. you finally will get all of them... and you need to have have all of them...´´

If the decision is between VOODOO LOUNGE and BRIDGES TO BABYLON, it really doesn't matter. I prefer the latter, but the difference in quality - or in anything - isn't really that big. Sure latter-day Stones sound in both cases.

- Doxa

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Blueranger ()
Date: March 28, 2015 10:43

If I had to choose between Voodoo and Bridges, it would be Voodoo.

Voodoo has classic songwriting and minimum filler.

Bridges is different and more experimental.

As others have pointed out, it's up to yourself.

If you have Spotify, then take a listen to them for free.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: March 28, 2015 11:05

Quote
stones2000

I'm either going to get Voodoo Lounge or Babylon.

On iTunes you can listen 1min30s to every Track of Voodoo Lounge or Bridges to Babylon and make a comparison by yourself ....

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: windmelody ()
Date: March 28, 2015 12:17

Bridges is a good album, at times it is a bit overproduced.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: RomanCandle ()
Date: March 28, 2015 12:41

Quote
Doxa
Oh I miss those days when there still were Stones albums I didn't have heard yet...grinning smiley

It doesn't matter in which order you buy them.. you finally will get all of them... and you need to have have all of them...´´

If the decision is between VOODOO LOUNGE and BRIDGES TO BABYLON, it really doesn't matter. I prefer the latter, but the difference in quality - or in anything - isn't really that big. Sure latter-day Stones sound in both cases.

- Doxa

But why does he want to choose between Voodoo Lounge and B2B? I want to know, because that would be like choosing between plague and cholera.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: mitch ()
Date: March 28, 2015 13:46

Quote
stones2000
Hi. I'm considering buying Bridges to Babylon, but I was hoping I could get some advice on the album from other users. What do you think of the album? Thanks

Is it a joke?
You are asking advices for an album you can buy for $3 on ebay or amazon!
Buy it and write us your review instead waisting your time asking what to do.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: whitem8 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 13:52

Fantastic later day album. Has an edge to it, probably because Jagger and Richards were fighting again! Some great rock n' roll on this. Gospel rock. Reggae. Blues. Richards sings three. THREE! Fantastic songs. Production is much better than just Don Was, with some interesting stuff going on. Get it!

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: kammpberg ()
Date: March 28, 2015 15:23

my review of Voodoo Lounge:


Voodoo Lounge – 1994 (US #2; UK#1)[/b][/b]
Love Is Strong • You Got Me Rocking • Sparks Will Fly • The Worst • New Faces • Moon Is Up • Out Of Tears • I Go Wild • Brand New Car • Sweethearts Together •
Suck On The Jugular • Blinded By Rainbows • Baby Break It Down •
Thru & Thru • Mean Disposition

Stones Fan – *****
Casual Listener - ****

The Stones had come back so strong in 1989 with Steel Wheels and its record-breaking tour. It was truly a new beginning for the band. Unfortunately, after threatening to do so for so long, Bill Wyman decided to quit the band in 1993. He wanted to go out while the band was still on top. Steel Wheels was a very strong return, although lacking in any definitive classic songs. Mick and Keith made a concerted effort this time to work together and make a classic type Rolling Stones album, with another monster tour to coincide with it. They decided to bring in Don Was as co-producer, who would go on to become their most influential and long-lasting producer since Jimmy Miller. They also decided to bring in Daryl Jones as the replacement bassist on their albums and tours.

Love Is Strong is the opening track on the album and the first single released. It’s an excellent and original way to open the album, unlike anything the Stones had done before. It has a bluesy swampy groove with Mick Jagger talk singing in a lower register to create an eerie yet warm feel, aided by great background vocals. The standout instrument throughout is Mick’s forceful harp playing. The groove is reminiscent of Dancing With Mr. D, but this is more interesting and original. Even though Love Is Strong has one of The Stones best videos (giant size Stones traipsing through Manhattan) and was strong live, the song is relatively un-commercial and not really single material. It did peak at #14 in the UK, but in the US it peaked at #91, virtually killing the Stones forever on the US singles charts. It’s a courageous and gutsy way to start the album, which ultimately probably hurt its commercial appeal.

Next up is You Got Me Rocking, a strong sounding Stones rocker greatly helped by its catchy chorus “Hey Hey, You Got Me Rocking”, that is especially effective live. Mick recites a litany of people down on their luck over a driving beat lead by Charlie on the floor tom. Considering that this is the type of track that would normally open the album, The Stones are definitely trying to shake things up here. It’s a powerful track that The Stones have continued to play live ever since, trying to boost its reputation to warhorse status. As good as it is, its simply not there yet. You Got Me Rocking was the 2nd single and hit #23 in the UK charts, but didn’t even chart in the US.

Into another strong rocker with a more punk edge, Sparks Will Fly was also effective live. Mick warns that “Sparks Will Fly when I get myself back on you” and the lusty lyrics are matched by the fiery music. He takes the lyrics overboard when he’s going to “@#$%& your sweet ass” in an unnecessary attempt to shock, but this is a solid rocker with definite life in it.

After those two driving rockers, The Stones take it down for an amazing four-song stretch. The Worst is Keith’s first lead vocal on the album and it’s a wonderful country flavored song. Keith warns that he’s the “worst kind of guy to have around” over tastefully laid-back music highlighted by Woody’s pedal steel playing and some genuine Irish fiddle. At a little over 2 minutes, it seems way too brief. Keith also did it really well live in his solo spotlight.

Continuing this classy interlude is Mick in his almost solo spot with New Faces, a song reminiscent to Angel In My Heart from Wandering Spirit. Mick opens his heart showing his jealousy as a younger man makes advances on his woman. The warm music is lead by Chuck Leavell’s wonderful harpsichord and harmonium playing and Keith’s luscious acoustic guitar. At also less than 3 minutes, these two brief interludes are actually wonderfully produced songs.

At over 62 minutes, Mick Jagger said he wanted to take full advantage of the CD’s length and give maximum value for dollars. I certainly applaud the attitude, although sometimes a tighter 45-minute album (like U2 and Springsteen are prone to do), just make a smoother better overall listening experience. Moon Is Up is an experimental piece that wouldn’t have made the cut on a shorter record’s length. Mick’s talk/sing vocals are down in the mix like Love Is Strong. The music is a collage of strange sounds, including Charlie beating on some mystery drum, mixed with wah-wah pedal steel guitar, accordion, harp and castanets. It’s a valiant attempt at something different although not really successful.

The 3rd single Out Of Tears actually charted in the US (at a shockingly disappointing #60, and disappointing #36 UK), but was by far the most commercial song on the album. Another live favorite on the tour, Out Of Tears is a tremendously powerful ballad with a beautifully arranged string arrangement that doesn’t dilute its power. Mick sings heartfelt and delicately throughout. The piano is the main instrument here, and Woody takes a note perfect slide guitar solo. The chorus with its “I Won’t Cry When You Say Goodbye, I’m Out Of Tears”, matched by the ever-building music makes an amazing Stones ballad. In a perfect world, this would have been a smash hit and is a lost classic.

After that almost 15 minute break, The Stones rock hard again with I Go Wild, another song that worked tremendously well on the live Voodoo Lounge Tour. This is more of a classic rocker with strong weaving guitar riffing throughout and a nice Woody guitar solo. The ending buildup is the highlight as Jagger riffs on different types of girls topping it off with “politicians’ garish wives with alcoholic @#$%& like knives”, into “I Go Wild” over driving drums until the band comes back in full storm. This is a strong powerful live sounding rock song. It was the 4th single from the album, not charting in the US but reaching a very respectable #29 UK.

Similar to Moon Is Up, one can’t help but feel that Brand New Car would’ve been left off a shorter record. A bluesy rock track with a nice groove, it’s lifted up and saved by wonderful sax and trumpet highlights, although hurt by lyrics in which Mick is comparing his woman to a car (‘open the hood, I want to check if her oil smells good”). Considering that they play it live, I guess they like it, but to me it’s more of a throwaway.

Voodoo Lounge sounds like Mick and Keith working really close together and one can’t help but smile at Sweethearts Together. Who knows who it’s really about, but as Mick and Keith sing together “we’ve only just begun”, “ two hearts together as one”, you can’t help but be grateful that the partnership is back and sounding so strong. Charlie plays the brushes in an almost waltz like style, but with power and Mick and Keith’s acoustics (with some flamenco touches) interweave nicely. A wonderful accordion solo with some touches of pedal / lap steel from Woody is a highlight.
With all the warmth and obvious teamwork on this record, Suck On The Jugular sounds almost out of place. Unlike anything else on the album, this funky very upbeat song sounds like a Jagger solo album track. Daryl Jones funky bass is heavy in the mix, which add a nice dance mood. Jagger plays a great harmonica solo over the funk. The horn outbursts add power to the track and give it a James Brown feel. It’s a fine track, but it doesn’t really belong on this very Stonesish sounding album.

Next up is one of the great-unknown Stones tracks and the highlight of the album. Opening with a great individually picked tremolo electric guitar intro like I Don’t Know Why, Let It Loose and I Got The Blues, Blinded By Rainbows is a true lost classic. The powerful verses are simple with just the guitar and moody background effects. The band slowly comes in and build up to the explosive choruses as Jagger sings about “paradise lost”. Woody’s electric guitar solo backed with Charlie’s ride cymbal is expressive, classy and powerful. Blinded By Rainbows is absolutely terrific and has been disappointingly ignored by radio, the fans and The Stones themselves.

Baby Break It Down has a good steady R&B’ish groove with Charlie laying down four on the floor during the repeated choruses. The band sounds tight and strong and Daryl Jones’ bass is strong in the foundation. Woody’s pedal steel solo is adequate but I would’ve preferred another nice Jagger harp solo instead. This is a good album track and continues the album in fine form, but never reaches the height that it possibly could have.

Thru & Thru is probably the most unusual Keith lead vocal Stones track ever. The first half is simply Keith singing to his unaccompanied guitar. It’s striking in its simplicity as it continues into the first chorus in this same fashion. Charlie’s heavily echoed tom smashes and some swirling background effects add to the heavy atmosphere. At the almost 4 minute mark, the full band smashes in to great effect and Keith is singing and grooving marvelously. Largely forgotten until picked up by The Sopranos soundtrack, Thru & Thru continues to gain in reputation and may grow to a genuine classic.

The album ends on what at first seems like a throwaway, but is actually another highlight of the album. Ian Stewart would’ve loved to hear the Stones playing some genuine upbeat boogie-woogie as they do here on Mean Disposition. It’s been a long time to hear the Stones play so free and loose and having a bash. Even what sounds like a first take Chuck Berryish solo sounds genuinely inspired. As the song crashes to an end, it sounds like we just witnessed a true one-take and it’s inspired.

Steel Wheels was a strong return, but Voodoo Lounge was the band’s attempt to unify and create a truly inspired Rolling Stones classic. It was made to be played live and nine of its 15 tracks have appeared on stage. The album is warm and very cohesive sounding thanks to the excellent production of Don Was with The Glimmer Twins. Although the album was very successful, topping the UK chart and almost the US chart (and the corresponding tour was another record breaker), Voodoo Lounge, has now been forgotten to a disappointing extent. Although the sequencing of the songs is a bit off, and the album is a little long due to Jagger’s generosity, Voodoo Lounge is the last time The Stones have approached near classic album status.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: kammpberg ()
Date: March 28, 2015 15:25

my review of Bridges To Babylon:


Bridges To Babylon – 1997 (US #3; UK#6)
Flip The Switch • Anybody Seen My Baby? • Low Down • Already Over Me • Gunface • You Don’t Have To Mean It • Out Of Control • Saint Of Me • Might As Well Get Juiced • Always Suffering • Too Tight • Thief In The Night • How Can I Stop

Stones Fan – ****
Casual Listener – ***

Voodoo Lounge was a cohesive Rolling Stones album created with unity and single purpose. Either The Stones didn’t want to repeat the formula, or perhaps were unable to, but this time out they would go in the opposite direction. Two separate camps largely created Bridges To Babylon: Mick and Keith with various sub-producers and sidemen. Overseeing this was Executive Producers The Glimmer Twins with Don Was. In a way, similar to Dirty Work in that all these separate elements would try to come together into a uniformed sounding album. This time, the dividing anger was thankfully gone, and the album is much more successful as a whole.

Starting off with Flip The Switch, which Jagger boasted was the fastest track they’d ever done. With Charlie driving the song and nice interweaving guitar throughout, the song is a fine upbeat opening track. Unfortunately, it’s similarity in style to so many other Stones tracks and lack of originality leaves a lack of excitement. Even the ending where the band just sort of falls apart, suits it. It was featured on the corresponding live tour, but also felt largely forgotten after it was played.

The Stones hadn’t released a great commercial opening single since Start Me Up, so it was thrilling to hear Anybody Seen My Baby?. I anticipated huge commercial success for this single. Perhaps because of the lack of US singles success for Voodoo Lounge, this single was virtually not even released in the US, although it was a mild hit in the UK peaking at #22. Led by one of the warmest most inviting bass licks ever by The Stones, I still can’t believe this is not a smash hit classic single. It’s damn near perfect with its wonderful smooth groove, great vocals and tasty music. Even the rap interlude mixed down low as an added effect works well. Perhaps its lack of classic status is because it doesn’t work well live, but its cloudlike lightness is tremendous on record.

Low Down, with its classic sounding Stones guitar riffing sounds great after that smoothness. Jagger’s vocals are powerful and it’s nice to hear what sounds like The Stones playing together rocking tightly in their traditional way. Not mind blowing but a nice rock track that made a welcome occasional live appearance.

One can’t help but notice that oftentimes, the highlights of the most recent albums have been the ballads. No exception here as Already Over Me is another beautiful ballad, reminiscent of Out Of Tears’ style. A tasty guitar solo is a highlight of the track. Jagger’s vocals are also spot on, as he believably opens his heart about “what a fool I’ve been”. Perhaps too obvious to release as the second single, Already Over Me is a lost classic that is ripe for rediscovery.

Gunface has a similar feel to Low Down, but is even better with a funkier feel. Jagger’s rhythm guitar is gritty and gives the song a lot of meat. The breakdown where Jagger sings unaccompanied over the drums is a great bridge that leads back into the power funk rock. Gunface is a powerful track and sorely overlooked.

Keith’s lead vocal spots have consistently been going further away from riff rock. His affinity for reggae (Too Rude and Harder They Come were previous thrills) is exceptionally displayed on You Don’t Have To Mean It, a brilliant buoyant combo of reggae and calypso. This is upbeat, happy, joyous music that made occasional great live appearances on the tour.

Bridges To Babylon was another record-breaking tour with a great live show (the bridge was unforgettable as it raised above the crowd). But it was great to see The Stones out there playing the new material. Perhaps the highlight of the whole concert, and certainly the album is Out Of Control. Similar in nature to Midnight Rambler, this is a moody, extended song with various elements that push and pull to extraordinary heights. Like Midnight Rambler, the song truly comes alive in concert with the studio recording seemingly held back and reserved. Live, this song with Jagger’s amazing harp work simmers until it boils over. On record it fades out way too early. As the 3rd UK single, it peaked at #51, but regardless this is a definitive classic track better served live.

The almost gospel like rock of Saint Of Me was also another live highlight, that feels stilted on the album. The Hammond background, and “oh yeah” chorus along with Charlie’s powerful steady groove give an upbeat churchlike feel. The bridge with Jagger’s nicely strummed acoustic adds nice texture along with Woody’s tasteful lead solo. But, it falls short overall, just not feeling like The Stones, and is a surprising choice for the 2nd single, although it peaked at #26 UK.

Speaking of not sounding like The Stones, up next is Might As Well Get Juiced. Mick really is trying some new sounds here, singing in an electronic textured voice, along with some wild harp playing. Charlie’s drums are powerful and upfront, mixed together in a soup cooked up by The Dust Brothers who swirl in various synthesized effects to awesome effect. It was a great musical shock to see The Stones blast this out to a stunned crowd at Madison Square Garden. It’s a great musical experiment that feels strange within this album.

Always Suffering is the 2nd ballad on the album and although fine overall, this one is a bit generic without the dynamics of Already Over Me. Jagger also over sings for the first time on the album and it detracts from the songs power. More Jagger solo effort than Stones track, Always Suffering also sounds more demo than full fledge great ballad and is a missed opportunity.

Too Tight is the only straight-ahead Stones little rocker on the album and sounds strangely lost within the album’s framework. Ironically though, this is hidden little gem with wonderfully buried “60’s ish background vocals, tight little riffing and a great straight ahead vocal from Jagger. This could’ve fit on many Stones albums (almost Connection like on Between The Buttons) and would’ve certainly been a highlight on Emotional Rescue. For some reason, here it seems almost throwaway.

For the first time on any Stones album, Keith’s profile is so big now, and the CD’s expanded length enables him to have three lead vocal tracks here. Thief In The Night has a lazy but addictive groove onto which Keith lays down some phenomenal acoustic guitar treats throughout. The background vocals add considerable depth and power as the track grows in its effect. With a groove of this quality, you don’t miss Keith moving further away from his solo traditional riff rocking. This song also was a live treat and showed Keith willing to try something new live as well. The wonderful groove segues right in to Keith the jazz balladeer/crooner singing How Can I Stop. The jazziest song he’s ever done, imagine Keith singing in a smoky jazz club with delicate piano, tasteful guitar touches, soulful background vocals over Charlie simply playing ride cymbal and snare. The song ends on a Wayne Shorter sax solo that builds in intensity and jazzily fades out in what is the strangest ending of any Rolling Stones album. It’s a good, yet bewildering different type of song and unfortunately continues the occasional tradition of closing a Stones album with Keith crooning to diminishing results.

The Stones didn’t want to repeat Voodoo Lounge so they went the opposite way, working separately with lots of outside help and then trying to mesh it together in a uniform piece of work. They believed in the album as nine of its 13 tracks were played live on the tour, with Out Of Control and Saint Of Me taking on new and expanded life becoming genuine highlights of the show. Song by song, this is a very strong album, but as a unified statement, it doesn’t fully come together. You can hear, feel and sense that there’s too many cooks trying to prepare this meal and it detracts. Bridges To Babylon is unfortunately overall less than the sum of its individual parts.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 15:25

Quote
RomanCandle
Quote
Doxa
Oh I miss those days when there still were Stones albums I didn't have heard yet...grinning smiley

It doesn't matter in which order you buy them.. you finally will get all of them... and you need to have have all of them...´´

If the decision is between VOODOO LOUNGE and BRIDGES TO BABYLON, it really doesn't matter. I prefer the latter, but the difference in quality - or in anything - isn't really that big. Sure latter-day Stones sound in both cases.

- Doxa

But why does he want to choose between Voodoo Lounge and B2B? I want to know, because that would be like choosing between plague and cholera.

Because Voodoo and B2B are two of the few albums I'm missing. And this is what I'm saying about the negativity toward Babylon. But, then again, a lot of people were positive, too! Either way, I want to get Babylon first, I think. I mean, c'mon, three Keef songs!

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 15:30

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kammpberg
my review of Bridges To Babylon:


Bridges To Babylon – 1997 (US #3; UK#6)
Flip The Switch • Anybody Seen My Baby? • Low Down • Already Over Me • Gunface • You Don’t Have To Mean It • Out Of Control • Saint Of Me • Might As Well Get Juiced • Always Suffering • Too Tight • Thief In The Night • How Can I Stop

Stones Fan – ****
Casual Listener – ***

Voodoo Lounge was a cohesive Rolling Stones album created with unity and single purpose. Either The Stones didn’t want to repeat the formula, or perhaps were unable to, but this time out they would go in the opposite direction. Two separate camps largely created Bridges To Babylon: Mick and Keith with various sub-producers and sidemen. Overseeing this was Executive Producers The Glimmer Twins with Don Was. In a way, similar to Dirty Work in that all these separate elements would try to come together into a uniformed sounding album. This time, the dividing anger was thankfully gone, and the album is much more successful as a whole.

Starting off with Flip The Switch, which Jagger boasted was the fastest track they’d ever done. With Charlie driving the song and nice interweaving guitar throughout, the song is a fine upbeat opening track. Unfortunately, it’s similarity in style to so many other Stones tracks and lack of originality leaves a lack of excitement. Even the ending where the band just sort of falls apart, suits it. It was featured on the corresponding live tour, but also felt largely forgotten after it was played.

The Stones hadn’t released a great commercial opening single since Start Me Up, so it was thrilling to hear Anybody Seen My Baby?. I anticipated huge commercial success for this single. Perhaps because of the lack of US singles success for Voodoo Lounge, this single was virtually not even released in the US, although it was a mild hit in the UK peaking at #22. Led by one of the warmest most inviting bass licks ever by The Stones, I still can’t believe this is not a smash hit classic single. It’s damn near perfect with its wonderful smooth groove, great vocals and tasty music. Even the rap interlude mixed down low as an added effect works well. Perhaps its lack of classic status is because it doesn’t work well live, but its cloudlike lightness is tremendous on record.

Low Down, with its classic sounding Stones guitar riffing sounds great after that smoothness. Jagger’s vocals are powerful and it’s nice to hear what sounds like The Stones playing together rocking tightly in their traditional way. Not mind blowing but a nice rock track that made a welcome occasional live appearance.

One can’t help but notice that oftentimes, the highlights of the most recent albums have been the ballads. No exception here as Already Over Me is another beautiful ballad, reminiscent of Out Of Tears’ style. A tasty guitar solo is a highlight of the track. Jagger’s vocals are also spot on, as he believably opens his heart about “what a fool I’ve been”. Perhaps too obvious to release as the second single, Already Over Me is a lost classic that is ripe for rediscovery.

Gunface has a similar feel to Low Down, but is even better with a funkier feel. Jagger’s rhythm guitar is gritty and gives the song a lot of meat. The breakdown where Jagger sings unaccompanied over the drums is a great bridge that leads back into the power funk rock. Gunface is a powerful track and sorely overlooked.

Keith’s lead vocal spots have consistently been going further away from riff rock. His affinity for reggae (Too Rude and Harder They Come were previous thrills) is exceptionally displayed on You Don’t Have To Mean It, a brilliant buoyant combo of reggae and calypso. This is upbeat, happy, joyous music that made occasional great live appearances on the tour.

Bridges To Babylon was another record-breaking tour with a great live show (the bridge was unforgettable as it raised above the crowd). But it was great to see The Stones out there playing the new material. Perhaps the highlight of the whole concert, and certainly the album is Out Of Control. Similar in nature to Midnight Rambler, this is a moody, extended song with various elements that push and pull to extraordinary heights. Like Midnight Rambler, the song truly comes alive in concert with the studio recording seemingly held back and reserved. Live, this song with Jagger’s amazing harp work simmers until it boils over. On record it fades out way too early. As the 3rd UK single, it peaked at #51, but regardless this is a definitive classic track better served live.

The almost gospel like rock of Saint Of Me was also another live highlight, that feels stilted on the album. The Hammond background, and “oh yeah” chorus along with Charlie’s powerful steady groove give an upbeat churchlike feel. The bridge with Jagger’s nicely strummed acoustic adds nice texture along with Woody’s tasteful lead solo. But, it falls short overall, just not feeling like The Stones, and is a surprising choice for the 2nd single, although it peaked at #26 UK.

Speaking of not sounding like The Stones, up next is Might As Well Get Juiced. Mick really is trying some new sounds here, singing in an electronic textured voice, along with some wild harp playing. Charlie’s drums are powerful and upfront, mixed together in a soup cooked up by The Dust Brothers who swirl in various synthesized effects to awesome effect. It was a great musical shock to see The Stones blast this out to a stunned crowd at Madison Square Garden. It’s a great musical experiment that feels strange within this album.

Always Suffering is the 2nd ballad on the album and although fine overall, this one is a bit generic without the dynamics of Already Over Me. Jagger also over sings for the first time on the album and it detracts from the songs power. More Jagger solo effort than Stones track, Always Suffering also sounds more demo than full fledge great ballad and is a missed opportunity.

Too Tight is the only straight-ahead Stones little rocker on the album and sounds strangely lost within the album’s framework. Ironically though, this is hidden little gem with wonderfully buried “60’s ish background vocals, tight little riffing and a great straight ahead vocal from Jagger. This could’ve fit on many Stones albums (almost Connection like on Between The Buttons) and would’ve certainly been a highlight on Emotional Rescue. For some reason, here it seems almost throwaway.

For the first time on any Stones album, Keith’s profile is so big now, and the CD’s expanded length enables him to have three lead vocal tracks here. Thief In The Night has a lazy but addictive groove onto which Keith lays down some phenomenal acoustic guitar treats throughout. The background vocals add considerable depth and power as the track grows in its effect. With a groove of this quality, you don’t miss Keith moving further away from his solo traditional riff rocking. This song also was a live treat and showed Keith willing to try something new live as well. The wonderful groove segues right in to Keith the jazz balladeer/crooner singing How Can I Stop. The jazziest song he’s ever done, imagine Keith singing in a smoky jazz club with delicate piano, tasteful guitar touches, soulful background vocals over Charlie simply playing ride cymbal and snare. The song ends on a Wayne Shorter sax solo that builds in intensity and jazzily fades out in what is the strangest ending of any Rolling Stones album. It’s a good, yet bewildering different type of song and unfortunately continues the occasional tradition of closing a Stones album with Keith crooning to diminishing results.

The Stones didn’t want to repeat Voodoo Lounge so they went the opposite way, working separately with lots of outside help and then trying to mesh it together in a uniform piece of work. They believed in the album as nine of its 13 tracks were played live on the tour, with Out Of Control and Saint Of Me taking on new and expanded life becoming genuine highlights of the show. Song by song, this is a very strong album, but as a unified statement, it doesn’t fully come together. You can hear, feel and sense that there’s too many cooks trying to prepare this meal and it detracts. Bridges To Babylon is unfortunately overall less than the sum of its individual parts.

Wow thank you so much for that! Great review!

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: stones2000 ()
Date: March 28, 2015 15:46

Quote
bv
Considering buying it? How can you live without it? Buy it, play it loud, and see you on tour this summer!

I mean, this is what I wrote about the album in 1997, and I do still mean it, every word:

[www.iorr.org]

Ah, thank you bv! Oh yeah, I'm planning on getting it asap! and yeah maybe I will see you on tour this summer



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-03-28 15:47 by stones2000.

Re: Bridges to Babylon
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: March 28, 2015 16:02

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Testify
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mtaylor

Thank you for sharing this video, I had never seen. I did not know they played Low down live.

It's nice to hear that they played Lowdown. Once. It has more life to it than Love Is Strong as far as being played live goes. But Mick's throwing the words out in a more talk style doesn't really work. It's weird how he does that on some songs - why bother.

It's a decent performance but there's it doesn't really do much - like a few of the new songs on the VOODOO and BRIDGES tours, they were just sort of there. Not a whole lot to 'em. Perhaps if they'd played it (them) more than one time it would've developed something - like Out Of Control did.

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