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Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: March 1, 2019 19:14

Quote
jlowe

It was awful. Far worse than Altamont .
The victims families received compensation...did The Who have to pay up or was it the Promoters and Venue only?

From wiki..
"The families of the victims sued the band, concert promoter Electric Factory Concerts, and the city of Cincinnati. The suits were settled in 1983, awarding each of the families of the deceased approximately $150,000 ($377,300 today), and approximately $750,000 ($1,886,700 today) to be divided among the 23 injured."

Likely all three contributed to the settlement, but I'm not certain.

The laws enacted banning festival seating etc. while most have been rescinded or modified are still affecting concerts today. The Golden Circle standing tickets for example (standard on the European legs of No Filter) are only offered at the lone Canadian gig. Standing pit tickets are obviously available, but must meet the various city ordinances, so many sq ft per ticket etc. Festival seating is legal in most cities now with restrictions, but the tragedy still impacts most large venue tours.

OT 1st novel Pete Townshend - The Age of Anxiety
Posted by: ukcal ()
Date: March 5, 2019 12:04

The first novel from Pete Townshend
Coming 5 November 2019

The Age of Anxiety is a great rock novel, but that is one of the less important things about it. The narrator is a brilliant creation – cultured, witty and unreliable. The novel captures the craziness of the music business and displays Pete Townshend’s sly sense of humour and sharp ear for dialogue. First conceived as an opera, The Age of Anxiety deals with mythic and operatic themes including a maze, divine madness and long-lost children. Hallucinations and soundscapes haunt this novel, which on one level is an extended meditation on manic genius and the dark art of creativity.

Ten years ago I decided to create a magnum opus that would combine opera, art installation and novel. Suddenly here I am with a completed novel ready to publish. I am an avid reader and have really enjoyed writing it. I am also happy to say the majority of the music is composed, ready to be polished up for release and performance. It’s tremendously exciting.’ ~ Pete Townshend

MY THOUGHTS....The who or solo or all star cast for the music...stage show!

Lets hope we get a great who album this year and then next year a great rock opera as the who's swan song

Re: OT 1st novel Pete Townshend - The Age of Anxiety
Posted by: hopkins ()
Date: March 5, 2019 16:00

very interesting.

________________
brb



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-07 08:57 by hopkins.

OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 10, 2019 22:12

The Who's Roger Daltrey Talks Losing Money, Making New Music & The Tragedy Of Keith Moon At ILMC

3/8/2019 by Richard Smirke


Roger Daltrey during an interview at the 31st International Live Music Conference.(Carolina Faruolo)

"It's a very weird [time] because we're not really a band anymore," the singer said of making new music as The Who, even though he and Pete Townshend no longer record together.

As frontman of The Who, Roger Daltrey's place among the legends of rock and roll is well assured. It's also a legacy he continues to build with this year seeing The Who release its first new album since Endless Wire in 2006, as well as embark upon a 29 date North American tour, beginning May 7 in Grand Rapids, MI, promoted by Live Nation.

"It's full-blown The Who plus an orchestra. It's going to be incredible. We're not going to take our foot off the throttle. At the age of 75, it feels to me a way of getting to play our music that feels at least slightly dignified," the singer told former Dire Straits manager Ed Bicknell during a lively, reflective onstage interview at the 31st International Live Music Conference (ILMC).

Held at London's Royal Garden Hotel, Mar. 5-8, ILMC was attended by 1,800 live music professionals, including delegates from over 60 countries. The conference concludes today with a keynote talk by Dua Lipa and her father Dugi Lipa as part of its Futures Forum initiative to foster and encourage the next generation of live music executives.

In the meantime, here's some of the highlights from Daltrey's chat with Bicknell.

Roger Daltrey on the artists that first made him want to be a rock singer

I was a choir boy when I was about 6 or 7, so I had perfect pitch and I was a good singer. But it was only when I first heard and saw Elvis that I thought, 'That looks good.' But then when I heard Lonnie Donegan – [he] was the man who really made me become the singer I am. He was a singer that had a primal energy in the way that he sang that I totally identified with. You name most of the singers of my period and Lonnie Donegan was the one.

Making no money in the early years

In 1971, after touring for a whole year -- we'd spent about 9 months away from home in America touring -- we came back to the great news that our debt, instead of being £1.3 million had been knocked down to £650,000. We thought this is a losing game, but then we got lucky and [1969 album] Tommy hit and all the stuff that happened with that record. Finally record royalties started to come through and that saved us. But we didn't make any money until 1971.

The importance of formative managers Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp, often called the fifth and sixth members of The Who. They were fired by the band in 1974 over missing funds and unpaid royalties.

Lambert and Stamp were pivotal to our success. They were the best creative managers any band could have wished for, especially The Who. They were incredible. But they were crooked, so what do you do? I wanted to do a thing where they would stay on, do a bit of creative work, take 10 percent and let someone honest manage the business side. But Pete wouldn't support me on that. It wasn't until he went back to America about 18 months later and he went into his publishing account and found a lot of money missing. Then, of course, he threw the book at them and it got quite nasty. In the end, they ended up with nothing and we lost two great creative people. I never felt great about it, but at least we ended up with a manager [Bill Curbishley] who really does the deal for us.

How Bill Curbishley became The Who's manager

Bill Curbishley was working at [Lambert and Stamp's record label] Track. Every day he would disappear quite early from the office. I didn't realise at the time he was out on parole. Bill got done for a bank robbery that he didn't do. Equally, he could have got done for one that he did do. Bill did eight years inside for someone else, but he never ever told [on them]. That spoke to me: 'This man, if he does a deal with you, he'll be dead straight.'So that's how [he became our manager] and from that day we started to make money. Real money. He's fantastic and totally honest... He's as sharp as a razor.

Drink, drugs and Keith Moon

I was in a band with three addicts. Two alcoholics and Keith would take anything. I don't know how he survived as long as he did. You'd say, 'Do you want one of these Keith?' And he wouldn't want one. He'd want ten. He was bomb proof. He really was. But it was all hiding other stuff that he had inside him. He was so talented and he was so insecure. He would have you laughing till you had to walk out of the room because you couldn't laugh anymore. He was the funniest man I've ever met in my life. But under that was this incredible frailty and vulnerability and he couldn't channel his talent in a way that he could use creatively. He was a fantastic actor, but he could never do more than a cameo because he could never do the same thing twice. Keith had a lot of tragedy in his life and he never really came out of those tragedies. It was all buried inside him and he was trying to drown it with alcohol and the other drugs.

Why he personally stayed away from drugs

I wanted to be a singer and you can't do drugs and sing because most of them affect your voice. I tried speed in 1964 in the days when we were doing two shows a night: playing from 8 o'clock till 11 o'clock and 2 o'clock to 6 in the morning. That would be regular at the weekends. I tried the purple hearts and all they did was make me chew my lip and dry my mouth out, so I couldn't sing. So I thought if I want to be a singer, I can't do this and cut it out.

Getting temporarily sacked by his bandmates for flushing their drugs down the toilet

It was probably because I was straight and they were all off their heads, but it was really painful to hear this group of incredible musicians playing so badly. I couldn't take any more. So I came off stage and flushed their stuff down the loo. [Keith] wasn't best pleased.

Pete Townshend's ritual of smashing his guitar at the end of Who gigs

It's always frustrated me that when you read about The Who people always wrote about Pete smashing a guitar into an amp. They didn't get it. It was not about the visual of it. It was about the sound it made. When Pete used to break a guitar, it sometimes used to take him 10 minutes. It would be a like a sacrificial lamb. This thing would scream. It was an incredible sonic experience. The volume would leave us with our ears bleeding. Sometimes we used to come off stage and the ringing in our ears didn't go away for two days.

How 1969's rock opera Tommy precipitated a move away from straight-up pop music

We'd been experimenting with longer pieces of music and that was thanks to Kit Lambert again. Kit was always in love with ballet and opera and he was encouraging us that rock music could be much more than just a three minute single. Then Pete came up with this idea of, 'Let's do this rock opera.' We went into the studio and we spent two or three months there and we came up with Tommy. Thank goodness that we did because that was the record that took us away from being a pop band that produced a hit record every two or three months, which Pete was finding increasingly difficult to do, into being recognised as a band of musicians for the first time.

The genius of his bandmate Pete Townshend

People throw the word genius around pretty easily, but when it comes to music and songwriting you have to say that, Townshend, in rock music and popular music, is probably one of the most important composers of the 20th century. In that sense his music does contain genius.

Playing Woodstock festival in 1969

We did a two and half hour show and you couldn't have arranged it better. When it came to "See Me, Feel Me" right at the end of Tommy -- it had been three days of rain and everyone was up to their knees in mud -- the sun popped its head through over the horizon and it was dawn. It was an extraordinary moment. It was a light show that even the Stones couldn't afford.

Making new music as The Who

We're just doing a new album at the moment. But it's a very weird [time] because we're not really a band anymore. I just love my job of being the guy who takes what Pete's written as a solo song, looking at it and thinking, 'How do I make this work to move an audience?' It's that process for me that makes making records still worth it. Otherwise it's two guys in two different studios. We don't go in and make records like we used to. I wish it was that way but we're not a band. Since [bassist] John [Entwistle] and Keith died we're not a band in that sense. But equally, we can make music and as long as I can put a vocal on that has elevated a song from: there was a Pete Townshend song, to: there is a Who song, I'm happy.

Why he and Townshend no longer record together in the same studio

He don't like the look of me. I don't like the look of him.

His advice for young musicians starting out

Music has got a different position in society than it had. I don't know what it means now as I'm old… I can't give any advice to young people because the world has changed so much. It seems to me that being a celebrity on YouTube is much more important than it ever is to be a musician these days. I think until music can start to take that over, it's lost that place.

His pride at being honorary patron of The Teenage Cancer Trust and the important work the charity does

The music business wouldn't be a business without the support of teenagers, so we should look after them. If you think about life, you're 12 years a child and you're a teenager, adolescent and young adult until you're 25. That's the same amount of years that you're a child. So why is there only children's and adult hospitals when we know that our teenagers are totally psychologically and socially different than children and old geriatrics like me? It is almost an immoral act to put them in with kids or geriatrics. It's bad for the kids. It's bad for the teenagers. And it's bad for the older people. Mental health is incredibly important in the healing process, especially with serious illness and we can fix this.

[www.billboard.com]

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: March 10, 2019 22:48

Great interview.
Proof that you can stay at the top of the music business AND not do drugs.
Good man.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: hopkins ()
Date: March 10, 2019 23:57

he don't like the look of me and i don't like the look of him
playing his cards very close to the vest here?
i don't know much about the cascading nature of their relationship
in recent years; know they've been putting on some solid shows.
Daltry's a gent; we're lucky to have a clear survivor giving testimony,
a little like Bill in a far out way; more reliable then the uber intelligent
and temptestuous writer.
i admire his standing up for the 'ten minutes' it woul take Pete to
make the guitar feedback bubble moan whine and explode; i guess
i've seen that several times in person. and some gigs where he
didn't do the theatrical smash-up were every bit as satisfying.
i saw them before Tommy; i had no idea they were carrying such debt...
the show was incredible. I was a fan from the start cuz 'my generation'
on the radio def got this album sale; but i liked the whole record.
i was into james brown and it was a cool surprise that this spare
outfit was grooving james...love The Who. really respect what they were and what they did. i do remember that first live Keith Moon experience at
Sheeps Meadow in Central Park. I was still im High School and Tommy would
hit in my senior year....but that was before that...
i went with older friends, already graduated and in college,
and didn't know really what to expect of them live. and close.
i kept looking at Moon swallowing huge loads of water and seeming
to sweat it right out again as he roared....
'how can he do that,' was my question to my older friends.
it really seemed inhuman after several songs...
'speed' was the answer; i didn't know what to think.
maybe i had tried cannabis by then; but not anything else...
it was a triumphant show; the sadness inherent in his legacy is awful painful.
Roger's a fine gent; and in his prime with The Who, well, that was an original band.
i hadn't heard of Link Wray at the time, Pete did this enormous big creative
STEP with his guitar style. i really like pete and roger and it's a gift they are still working.
---------------------------


gosh how amazing is it that a band could come with 3 really good albums,
hits on all of em; plus the Magic Bus compilation, that's 4 before Tommy.
we didn't get The Who at all til '65 I think they were a bit behind the
dam beetles and our boys, as far as the debut....
....but that's a lot of touring and peripeheral events and recording
and all that to have huge attendance and still be over half mill in debt.
guess dam beetles had klein after epstein...and our boys too w klein...
elvis had the colonel. i don't know if andrew ripped the boys
or why they fired him for sure....

________________
brb



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-11 00:04 by hopkins.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: March 11, 2019 00:35

Yes, I think it's fair to say that, like Lambert and Stamp, Andrew Oldham was less than straight in his business dealings.
What is it with these Managers?
Greed? Corrupt?

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: crholmstrom ()
Date: March 11, 2019 01:35

Quote
jlowe
Yes, I think it's fair to say that, like Lambert and Stamp, Andrew Oldham was less than straight in his business dealings.
What is it with these Managers?
Greed? Corrupt?

the popular music business is crooked & always has been. they just keep finding new ways to rip off the artists.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: mikey C ()
Date: March 11, 2019 03:04

Look up Bob Dylan 1st manager Albert Grossman...He will say how the pie was cut

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: March 11, 2019 04:57

Quote
jlowe
Great interview.
Proof that you can stay at the top of the music business AND not do drugs.
Good man.

And you can dislike each other but still get an album finished even if not working together in the same studio.

Why he and Townshend no longer record together in the same studio

"He don't like the look of me. I don't like the look of him". - Roger

Keith and Mick - take note. Hate each other as much as you want, but don't let it get in the way of a new album.

LONG LIVE ROCK

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: swimtothemoon ()
Date: March 11, 2019 22:52

Maybe he was joking with the “He don’t like the look of me” comment? If Rodger
is only adding the vocals, to the already finished songs, this method may be the most efficient. However, given their history, limiting their face to face time may give them the best chance of finishing the new album. Glad they are dedicated to putting the new Album out for the new tour. Thanks for posting the interview!

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: hopkins ()
Date: March 11, 2019 23:47

what a cool way of putting it; without savaging the other clown in the twin show.
he don't like the look of me and i don't like...
is that an expression common in the UK; or common to working class UK
language of that generation; i mean, it's pretty straight shooting.
it'd be a great line in a Western movie ...
love Roger; he bummed a 'fag' from me when i was a teenager.
i'd not heart the expression before as pertaining to cigs
but he gestured, it was clear. just a few minutes with your teen
age idol; i thought myself more of man than that at almost 18,
and was in some ways from reading and exposure to a Lot of music
and art and books by then...and i didn't embarass myself or stress him;
it was very mellow; but i'm still thrilled.
i wish i could tell YEW YUNGG PIPPLE what it was like to be standing
right in front of that band in 1968, then several times in '69 and
thru the earliest 70's. I'll forever be attempting to do it some
kind of justice in a more focused post, or maybe an essay...
...because i feel that this connection to American rock and roll culture,
and The Who are a Huge part of that for me and many....
....yes, Even with those proud Union Jacks at every show; which we
also loved them for...whoa. the metropolitan opera house in new york city.
THAT is an achievement.
and for this scruffy lot of hard bangers and hangers, can you imagine...
the ushers looked DOWN at the paying customers; us rats;
but there was no troubler at all; omg those cincinatti memories ...
wasn't there but whoa....man....one of the main Tommy themes is
this Idol has hysterical fans; sally gets slashed across the face,
tommy turns round as a Uniformed Man and throws her off the stage...
that was the pivotal line and lesson for me; the ever new fascism
to be on the lookout fer...
i don't care how much i get criticized personally for rock and roll .
i got thrown in the closet in 7th grade for suggesting that the dam
beetles were not 'just a passing fad,' tho i was very polite
in suggesting that the impact might be signaling something
more lasting...
whammm, dragged to the closet and the door closes...
welcome to seventh grade.
if it was for the Stones i'd be proud not ashamed.
by high school tho, i was getting suspended for Stones stuff.
hate those dam beetles.
love the Who...
hoppy will delete most of this don't worry;
it's fresh meat for the newbies...
they think a new album is coming out..
ssshh, this is so cool...keep it going keep it going...

________________
brb

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 14, 2019 19:15


Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: March 14, 2019 19:27


Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 14, 2019 20:03


Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 14, 2019 22:49

Pete: Who Recording Update and Wembley Stadium

[www.youtube.com]

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: RollingFreak ()
Date: March 15, 2019 03:31

Its amazing that they hate each other and still do stuff like that. I guess its good but still funny to see.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Paddy ()
Date: March 15, 2019 07:24

Do they hate each other at this point? I thought they’ve gotten on well in the last 20 years or so?

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: swimtothemoon ()
Date: March 15, 2019 08:29

Quote
Paddy
Do they hate each other at this point? I thought they’ve gotten on well in the last 20 years or so?

Yes this is my understanding. Maybe a jab or two in the press but it’s mostly in
fun and a nod to their past differences. They seem to respect each other’s opinions and differences.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: tommycharles ()
Date: March 15, 2019 08:41

Quote
swimtothemoon
Quote
Paddy
Do they hate each other at this point? I thought they’ve gotten on well in the last 20 years or so?

Yes this is my understanding. Maybe a jab or two in the press but it’s mostly in
fun and a nod to their past differences. They seem to respect each other’s opinions and differences.

Speaking from experience - it is entirely possible to be in a band with someone with whom you have nothing in common. Pete and Roger have The Who’s shared experiences in common, certainly, but precious little else. They get along insofar as Rog is great at singing Pete’s songs. But it’s not like they’d go for a pint together.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: crholmstrom ()
Date: March 15, 2019 09:50

I've been watching the ticket situation for Seattle. Lots of tickets still available @ "standard" prices.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: March 15, 2019 19:29

Quote
tommycharles
Quote
swimtothemoon
Quote
Paddy
Do they hate each other at this point? I thought they’ve gotten on well in the last 20 years or so?

Yes this is my understanding. Maybe a jab or two in the press but it’s mostly in
fun and a nod to their past differences. They seem to respect each other’s opinions and differences.

Speaking from experience - it is entirely possible to be in a band with someone with whom you have nothing in common. Pete and Roger have The Who’s shared experiences in common, certainly, but precious little else. They get along insofar as Rog is great at singing Pete’s songs. But it’s not like they’d go for a pint together.

Similar to Mick and Keith, but seems Roger and Pete get along much better - at least they can still make a new album in a relatively short amount of time.

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: tommycharles ()
Date: March 15, 2019 21:36

Quote
Hairball

Similar to Mick and Keith, but seems Roger and Pete get along much better - at least they can still make a new album in a relatively short amount of time.

I think the difference with Mick and Keith is that way back in the mists of time, they were close friends.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Cristiano Radtke ()
Date: March 16, 2019 19:42


Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: March 16, 2019 20:05

Quote
tommycharles
Quote
Hairball

Similar to Mick and Keith, but seems Roger and Pete get along much better - at least they can still make a new album in a relatively short amount of time.

I think the difference with Mick and Keith is that way back in the mists of time, they were close friends.

Another big difference is that in The Who there is only one (essentially) songwriter.
In the Stones, you have two.
More scope for disagreements etc.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: Paddy ()
Date: March 17, 2019 01:44

Quote
tommycharles
Quote
swimtothemoon
Quote
Paddy
Do they hate each other at this point? I thought they’ve gotten on well in the last 20 years or so?

Yes this is my understanding. Maybe a jab or two in the press but it’s mostly in
fun and a nod to their past differences. They seem to respect each other’s opinions and differences.

Speaking from experience - it is entirely possible to be in a band with someone with whom you have nothing in common. Pete and Roger have The Who’s shared experiences in common, certainly, but precious little else. They get along insofar as Rog is great at singing Pete’s songs. But it’s not like they’d go for a pint together.

I think there’s a respect there, they may not have a lot in common but hate isn’t the word of use to describe their relationship. Co workers is more accurate I think.

Sometimes the people you have nothing in common with turn out to be the right for musically. I can’t remember what musician (if any) said it’s like playing football, you don’t have to like they guy you pass the ball to.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: hopkins ()
Date: March 17, 2019 03:36

those guys love each other; it's a reallll long marriage and shit happens.
they're staying together and working it out.
the fans will get a bit of history, however remote.
And some great guitar from a true original and groundbreaker with an original
writing and also guitar style. he's an original, and he's working.
i ain't seen em since all original members, but I've seen relatively recent
stuff on You Tube ; the 'Vegas' Who; or whatever.
like any great artists with so much incredible and historic road warrior background,
they're gonna play around the edges of greatness and look
for openings; and achieve something special and satisfying now and again.
it'll be professional and passionate; they ain't wankin,' they're working.
and zak is solid and pretty great too.

________________
brb



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-17 03:37 by hopkins.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: josepi ()
Date: March 19, 2019 08:20

The Who were the one band that I always regretted never seeing live. Had a ticket to see the Cincinnati stampede concert, but our driver backed out at the last minute.

As it turns out, The Who were actually the first band I ever saw live. In doing some research a few months ago, I found out that they opened for Herman's Hermits at the Ohio State Fair in 1967. I was a big Hermit's fan back then. It was my first concert. I don't remember the Who at all from that show. Not a bit.

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: March 19, 2019 18:57

Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend chat to Absolute Radio's Claire Sturgess about their upcoming Wembley Stadium gig and a new album on the horizon.

[www.youtube.com]

Re: OT: The Who stuff
Posted by: crawdaddy ()
Date: March 19, 2019 23:01

Big thanks to bbj and Cristiano for all the latest info from The Who. smileys with beer

I only wish Mick and the lads would do this sort of thing on youtube or Facebook to make themselves more friendly towards the fans with some interesting info about what's happening.
The Tour and the upcoming new album are on the way, but nothing about it much at the moment from The Stones themselves.

Plenty of time on their hands at the moment so hopefully we may hear or see something soon in the media with some nice interviews on radio or youtube etc.

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