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Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: October 9, 2019 04:17

Quote
whitem8
Also John Lennon was worth $800 million at the time of his death. George Harrison worth $400 million at the time of his death. The Beatles and amassed far more money than Stones. Beatles have sold over 600 million albums worldwide. The Stones 240 million.

That number, even in 2019, continues to get wider and wider apart it seems.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: October 9, 2019 04:21

Quote
marianna
I don't like Giles Martin's remixes. I'm glad the Stones don't have someone remixing their original albums.

Lucky for you and anyone else - they are simply a choice: they have zero relevance with the original intention/release of anything, which will always exist. If you don't like it you don't have to buy it.

I like it. It doesn't change anything other than just being another way to listen.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: October 9, 2019 05:14

...I won't be buying it ...

ROCKMAN

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: October 9, 2019 11:30

Quote
Deltics
Quote
georgie48
What to say on this?
The very first Rollin' Stones fans (Londoners) saw them with Dick Taylor on base (and Tony Chapman on drums). I (stupidly) missed an opportunity to see the band with Brian in 1967 (Stu I saw a couple of times in Rotterdam), but this goes a bit too far for me. The original Beatles had George Best on drums and Stuart Sutcliffe on guitar, but that's part of life. Everything evolves and so did the Rolling Stones. But they still are the Rolling Stones nontheless.
smileys with beer

He then quit drumming to become one of the finest footballers in the country!


grinning smileygrinning smileygrinning smiley>grinning smiley<
Yeah Deltics, that the problem with getting older .... all that information in our brains. Sometimes it gets mixed up. But you gave me a big laugh. Sorry "Pete"
smileys with beer

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: georgie48 ()
Date: October 9, 2019 12:00

Quote
Hairball
I forgot to mention the Beatles MONO Box set (as well as the stereo box)- the Mono is priceless, and once again they blazed a trail with the Stones following.
That said, thankfully the Stones did release a Mono Box set eventually as it is also pricelss - for that we should thank the Beatles.


*And the Stones BBC which was a bit haphazard, but still, credit to the Beatles for making it happen as they released their BBC Volume 1 way back in '94, and it is essential. thumbs up

I have to be careful with what I say, but I think Mick Jagger is a man who has always prefered to look into the future (and that helped with the band still being around) and sort of avoided anything that had to do with the past ... apart from, understandably, when it generates money. And whatever happens in relation to the Beatles (but he also seriously looked/looks at ABBA things) and becomes succesful, he is in for it. Who wouldn't?
Keith, I think, just wants to make music and loves his guitars winking smiley and his fans.

By the way, Hairball, it is/was often said that the Stones' Satanic album was "just following" Pepper's, but ... I had the privilege to read that massive (expensive) book titled "Stu" and you can find that the Stones already started in late 1966 with experimenting with "psychedelic" music (not mentioning Brian's even earlier Hear It) part of it ending up on the Satanic album. Also, John once said in an interview that he was inspired by the brass section in BTB's "Something Happened To Me Yesterday" as well as the song as a whole.
They were very close in those days and learned a lot from eachother. Business wise the Beatles were mostly somewhat ahead, though. (Okay, their Apple Company in the end failed, avoiding the Stones making the same mistake). Epstein was much more a business man, where Oldham was much more into image building (including his own). Those were the days winking smiley

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: October 9, 2019 12:17



MOJO 311 --- October 2019

ROCKMAN

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: frankotero ()
Date: October 9, 2019 13:39

Hmm, I don't see it as an insult myself. In my opinion it's modernized to sound better. I believe most the artists would appreciate it. Also, I believe it's important to keep the original in existence as to not try to rewrite history. My 2 cents for what it's worth.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Lynd8 ()
Date: October 9, 2019 17:32

Beatles win as far as awesome boxed sets - I really like the new Abbey Road set and didn’t even bother with Let it Bleed.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 9, 2019 20:08

5 star reviww from Rolling Stone:

A Deluxe Edition of ‘Abbey Road’ Lets Us Rediscover the Beatles’ Joyous Final Masterpiece

“All four knew it was the end,” Rob Sheffield writes of this 50th anniversary reissue. “For the last time in their lives, they were writing, playing and singing Beatles songs.”

Abbey Road

Even by Beatles standards, Abbey Road has always been an album full of mysteries. How could the world’s most beloved band make their sunniest, warmest, most charming music while they were in the middle of breaking up? How did John, Paul, George and Ringo come together to drop their all-time biggest crowd-pleaser, while gearing up to go their separate ways? The eternal mysteries of Abbey Road only get deeper as you explore the revelatory new Super Deluxe Edition, released on the album’s 50th anniversary. It follows the recent Sgt. Pepper and White Album boxes — and like them, it will transform the way fans hear and argue about this music.

Abbey Road has always represented a historic peak of pop invention and perfection — that’s why Drake just got the cover tattooed on his arm. To this day, it remains their biggest seller. But it’s also their bittersweet goodbye. After the disastrous Get Back sessions in early 1969, they regrouped for one last blaze of glory. The final moment when all four were playing together was when they cut “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” All four knew it was the end. For the last time in their lives, they were writing, playing and singing Beatles songs.

For any other band, this situation might have tempted them into hoarding the best songs for their solo records. But the Beatles were far too competitive, too ambitious, too vain, too bloody-minded for that. They didn’t merely bring in brilliant songs—they brought brilliant Beatle songs, as if they knew they’d never get another chance to write tunes for these voices to sing. John never wrote another “Because,” just like George never wrote another “Something” or “Here Comes The Sun.” These were their love songs to being Beatles together.

Giles Martin and Sam Okell have done a new mix in stereo, 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos. The mix does wonders for moments like the three-way guitar duel in “The End,” with Paul, George and John trading off solos live on the studio floor. The Sgt. Pepper and White Album sets were packed with mind-blowing experiments and jams, but Abbey Road is considerably more focused. In these 23 outtakes and demos, you hear a band in the zone, knowing exactly what they want to do, working hard to finesse the details, even the ones only they’ll notice. They’re playful, like when John messes with the lyrics of “Mean Mr. Mustard”: “His sister Bernice works in the furnace!” But it’s four confident men, determined to show off for the world — and more importantly, for each other.

There’s a fantastic alternate version of “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” from Trident Studios in London, where the lads get interrupted by angry complaints about noise from the neighbors. John politely agrees to turn down the volume, after one last take. Then he tells the band, “Last chance to be loud!” There’s also a poignant outtake of “The Ballad of John and Yoko” — just John on guitar and Paul on drums, while the other two are out of town. John quips, “A bit faster, Ringo.” Paul replies, “Okay, George!” It’s a touching joke to overhear. They’re still in love with this band of theirs.

Abbey Road has a warmth unlike any of their other music, which is why its popularity never dips. Especially among the young folks — as Giles Martin says, “It’s a kids’ album.” The songs are full of odd role reversals: suddenly Paul is the hard-ass realist singing about money and lawyers, while John and George prefer to sing about how nice sunshine is. (A rule of thumb: whenever a Beatle sings about sunshine, it means they’re trying to duck a fight with the others.) Paul’s lush Side Two symphony is a tour de force, but it’s also full of his melancholy that one sweet dream is ending. It’s in his voice when he sings, “Soon we’ll be away from here / Step on the gas and wipe that tear away.”

Abbey Road has always been cherished by Ringophiles, as an eight-track recording that lets Ringo’s toms finally boom the way he always wanted. He hits home all over this new mix — he also croons a countrified “Octopus’ Garden.” The remix highlights hidden details like the girl-group handclaps that sneak into the guitar break of “Here Comes The Sun,” or the bells, chirps, and splashes that cue “Sun King.” There’s a raw blues romp through “Come Together.” (Followers of the long-running Armchair Controversy will note that John definitely sings, “Hold you in his arms, yeah,” plus other lyrical goofs, though he switched back to “armchair” for the album version. May that argument never end.)

Paul shines in his demo of “Goodbye,” a fetchingly flirty ditty he gave away as a hit to his protege Mary Hopkins. (Years later, she’d resurface as one of the voices oooing and sighing on David Bowie’s “Sound and Vision.”) It’s Paul in his most coquettish upper-register voice, reminiscent of how he sang “Can you take me back where I came from?” on the White Album. There are three takes of “Her Majesty.” An unexpected delight: George Martin’s isolated orchestration from “Something.” You’ve heard these strings all your life, in the background, but now you can revel in details like the Brian Wilson-style Pet Sounds pizzicato. As for the album’s dottiest gaffe, “Maxwell’s Silver Hammer,” maybe you were hoping Take 12 might reveal new layers of nuance and meaning? Sorry — get ready to have a clang-clang dropped on your dreams. It’s hard not to suspect Paul drove them through so many takes just to piss them off.

During the Get Back debacle, George tried to teach them a new tune called “All Things Must Pass.” John ignored him and strummed a Chuck Berry riff until George stomped out and quit the band for a week. (John’s response was not his most sympathetic: “I think if George doesn’t come back by Monday or Tuesday, we’ll ask Eric Clapton to play.”) George didn’t bring this song back for Abbey Road—after that bitter experience, he’d officially given up on sharing his mystic muse with the others. Knowing he’d only get his usual two songs, he brought in a couple of pop tunes. But they turned out to be the most famous and beloved tracks: “Here Comes The Sun” and “Something.”

These twin classics sound nothing like the songs he wrote for Sgt. Pepper or the White Album. They also sound nothing like the devotionals he was already demoing for his solo album, where “All Things Must Pass” became the title track. “Something” and “Here Comes The Sun” are heartfelt, but they’re also George making a self-conscious effort to write Beatles songs rather than George songs. If he was trying to beat John and Paul at their own game and shock them into trying harder, he succeeded. These tunes fired up that restless hunger the lads had to impress each other, which none of them ever really lost, even after the band split.

Nobody’s a grudging participant on Abbey Road, no matter what they might have claimed later. George and John already had mapped out their exits, planning their big free-at-last solo statements — All Things Must Pass and Plastic Ono Band, both released at the end of 1970. So they felt free emotionally to commit themselves to one more summer of being Beatles again. (They also knew their next records would be with Phil Spector, so they didn’t have to butt heads with Mr. Martin, knowing this was just temporary.) Instead of fighting to prove themselves as individuals, they poured their hearts into expressing themselves as Beatles. Like John says, they knew it was their last chance to be loud. But more than that, they knew it was their last chance to be a band.

That team spirit is summed up in the cocky bravado of the cover photo — the Fab Four strutting across Abbey Road, knowing how cool they look, transforming an ordinary London street into a legend just because of the eight Beatle feet trotting over the zebra-stripe crosswalk. But you also hear that teamwork in the music. When they slide from “Polythene Pam” into “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window,” that’s not a tape edit — it’s a rock & roll band deep in the pocket. You can also see it in the photos from this edition’s lavish coffee-table book. There’s a Linda McCartney photo that sums up the vibe: George looks on while Ringo attempts to play the Moog synthesizer. It’s a strangely affectionate sight. Sun sun sun, here it comes.

The emotional highlight: “Because,” where John writes a harmony ballad for these three voices to sing. And only these three voices — it’s one of those Beatle songs that’s uncoverable, because nobody else can do it justice. Ringo might not be singing, but he’s right there — to help John, Paul and George stay in sync, he keeps time by clapping his hands. (His claps are audible in the outtake included here.) “Because” doesn’t resemble anything John went on to compose for his solo records — it’s his fond tribute to the old friends he’s leaving behind. In the new mix, “Because” sounds more powerful than ever. You can hear how precisely the lads rehearsed their harmonies, determined to get this one right. They stood around the microphones and sang it together, like they used to. It’s a moment where one and one and one is three. All over Abbey Road, you can hear that collaborative spirit, as all four Beatles come together. And then, signing off with “The End,” they step on the gas and wipe that tear away.

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 9, 2019 21:34

Just read it's John Lennon's birthday today - he would have been 79 years old....wow...

A few of my favorites (out of many others):

Tomorrow Never Knows

I'm Only Sleeping

Rain

Strawberry Fields Forever

I amd the Walrus

Dear Prudence

Across the Universe

Dig It

Sun King

#9 Dream

Watching the Wheels (stripped down version)

Could add dozens more, but gotta run....

Thanks for all the greatness John.

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: LazarusSmith ()
Date: October 9, 2019 22:45

That's a beautiful RS review, HB. One of the things that stands out for me:

Abbey Road has a warmth unlike any of their other music, which is why its popularity never dips. Especially among the young folks — as Giles Martin says, “It’s a kids’ album.”

So true. While I've been blasting this reissue for the past couple of weeks in the car, my 2 1/2 yr old is tappin his toes and my 6 yr old is constantly asking 'what's the name of this song - what's it about?'

There's a timeless genius of simplicity about the whole record that kids just feel.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Jah Paul ()
Date: October 10, 2019 00:13

Quote
LazarusSmith
That's a beautiful RS review, HB. One of the things that stands out for me:

Abbey Road has a warmth unlike any of their other music, which is why its popularity never dips. Especially among the young folks — as Giles Martin says, “It’s a kids’ album.”

So true. While I've been blasting this reissue for the past couple of weeks in the car, my 2 1/2 yr old is tappin his toes and my 6 yr old is constantly asking 'what's the name of this song - what's it about?'

There's a timeless genius of simplicity about the whole record that kids just feel.

So true, Laz. I was only four when the album was released (my older brother got it as a Christmas present in '69 from my cousin), so all of those Abbey Road songs represent my earliest Beatle memories. I remember in particular playing along to "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" with my toy rubber hammer - hitting our living room coffee table just at the right time! Whenever I've heard that song over the years, it always takes me back to our old house. With my parents both gone now, I've ended up with some of their old furniture - including that coffee table. The Beatles memories are endless throughout my entire life.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: October 10, 2019 00:26

Hey yeah Rolling Stone 5 Star rating ….
That's good …. same as Goddess In The Doorway ……. HhhaaHuhhhhaaaaaaa

ROCKMAN

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: LazarusSmith ()
Date: October 10, 2019 00:27

Quote
Jah Paul
Quote
LazarusSmith
That's a beautiful RS review, HB. One of the things that stands out for me:

Abbey Road has a warmth unlike any of their other music, which is why its popularity never dips. Especially among the young folks — as Giles Martin says, “It’s a kids’ album.”

So true. While I've been blasting this reissue for the past couple of weeks in the car, my 2 1/2 yr old is tappin his toes and my 6 yr old is constantly asking 'what's the name of this song - what's it about?'

There's a timeless genius of simplicity about the whole record that kids just feel.

So true, Laz. I was only four when the album was released (my older brother got it as a Christmas present in '69 from my cousin), so all of those Abbey Road songs represent my earliest Beatle memories. I remember in particular playing along to "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" with my toy rubber hammer - hitting our living room coffee table just at the right time! Whenever I've heard that song over the years, it always takes me back to our old house. With my parents both gone now, I've ended up with some of their old furniture - including that coffee table. The Beatles memories are endless throughout my entire life.

Awesome, JP!

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 10, 2019 00:52

Quote
LazarusSmith
Quote
Jah Paul
Quote
LazarusSmith
That's a beautiful RS review, HB. One of the things that stands out for me:

Abbey Road has a warmth unlike any of their other music, which is why its popularity never dips. Especially among the young folks — as Giles Martin says, “It’s a kids’ album.”

So true. While I've been blasting this reissue for the past couple of weeks in the car, my 2 1/2 yr old is tappin his toes and my 6 yr old is constantly asking 'what's the name of this song - what's it about?'

There's a timeless genius of simplicity about the whole record that kids just feel.

So true, Laz. I was only four when the album was released (my older brother got it as a Christmas present in '69 from my cousin), so all of those Abbey Road songs represent my earliest Beatle memories. I remember in particular playing along to "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" with my toy rubber hammer - hitting our living room coffee table just at the right time! Whenever I've heard that song over the years, it always takes me back to our old house. With my parents both gone now, I've ended up with some of their old furniture - including that coffee table. The Beatles memories are endless throughout my entire life.

Awesome, JP!

thumbs up Memories for a lifetime.

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: buttons67 ()
Date: October 10, 2019 01:23

beatles made nice music but the stones did it all.

from heart rending ballads to soulfull blues, to menacing rockers, top psychadelic trance, reggae, funk, country, they done it with beauty,melody. passion, aggression, intensity all using a wide variety of instruments.

and ive always believed john to be jealous of the stones, i really like a lot of johns solo stuff and i like a fair bit of beatles stuff, like across the universe, in my life, i saw her standing there, i am the walrus, a day in the life, but as ive always said, so much of it is bland and overrated. a lot of beatles music lacks energy despite being technically good.

beatles have their place in history, it would be unreasonable of anyone to ommit them from the all time top 10 bands, but are they the best ever, no way and thats why they are overrated. abba bounce better than them too.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: stone66 ()
Date: October 10, 2019 01:34

^^^^^^ Tom-a-to, tom-ah-to...


Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 10, 2019 02:51

"abba bounce better than them too".

smiling smiley

Can never pass up a chance to post this clip:

Abba - Waterloo

Gotta love it! thumbs up

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: GasLightStreet ()
Date: October 10, 2019 04:11

Seems that Glyn Johns doesn't understand what remastering is.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: MisterDDDD ()
Date: October 10, 2019 04:47

Happy what would have been 79th B'day to John.



Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: jlowe ()
Date: October 10, 2019 19:48

Quote
GasLightStreet
Quote
whitem8
Also John Lennon was worth $800 million at the time of his death. George Harrison worth $400 million at the time of his death. The Beatles and amassed far more money than Stones. Beatles have sold over 600 million albums worldwide. The Stones 240 million.

That number, even in 2019, continues to get wider and wider apart it seems.

Of course when Paulie was getting his divorce from Heather Mills/McCartney his personal fortune was valued at well below media speculation figures.
As no doubt were Mick and Ronnie's when they were getting divorced.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: buttons67 ()
Date: October 10, 2019 20:50

also remember, artists do gain popularity in death.

and im sure the stones will gain a new younger audience after their time is up.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 11, 2019 01:36

If the 5 star Rolling Stone review wasn't enough, Popmatters gives it 10 stars!


The Beatles 'Abbey Road Super Deluxe Edition' Sounds Fresh and New
Christopher John Stephens
03 Oct 2019

"This box set reissue is lovingly curated and mixed in stereo 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos by Giles Martin and Sam Okell.
Any concerns about revisiting the over-familiar are blown away by this remix work. It's almost as magical as hearing Abbey Road for the first time".


Abbey Road

The Beatles' copious output seems to have exceeded their existence as a recording group, which lasted only seven years. They recorded their final album, Abbey Road, in the summer of 1969, before any member was 30 years old. If Beatles fanatics are anything, they are statisticians and absolutists. Some will argue that Let It Be, released in April 1970 as the soundtrack to the film of the same name, was their swan song, but it was fully recorded (save for some 1970 finishing touches from producer Phil Spector) between 1968 and January 1969. That experience, known informally as the Get Back Sessions, was by all accounts a disastrous time for a group already fractured by so many issues.

That they came back shortly afterward for an intense six-month series of recording dates -- which would become Abbey Road -- is testimony to their perseverance as professionals. It also conveys their love of creating and playing music with each other, their obvious competitive nature, and their need to release something much more cohesive and brilliant than the Let It Be song, movie, and album. For many at the time of its release, Abbey Road came off as a bittersweet farewell and a tempting forecast of things to come for John, Paul, George, and Ringo.

On the heels of 50th anniversary boxed set releases of 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and 1968's The Beatles comes this three-disc (and one Blu-ray audio) restoration of Abbey Road, which includes a 100-page hardcover book of pictures and recollections. Abbey Road Anniversary Edition is part warm and blissful ("Here Comes the Sun", "Sun King"), with gorgeous harmony ("Because"), a funky reggae-tinged homage to Chuck Berry ("Come Together"), and a beautiful suite of seven songs that close side Two. The final song is not "The End", but rather a cheeky little ditty less than half a minute long called "Her Majesty".

Many think that Abbey Road is dominated by Paul McCartney, who was desperate to maintain a sense of unity and group dynamics with the rocker "She Came in through the Bathroom Window". Indeed, it's loaded with McCartney compositions such as the blues shouter "Oh, Darling", the gorgeous ballad "Golden Slumbers", and arguably the worst song of his Beatles career, "Maxwell's Silver Hammer". A nice offset to that mistake, "You Never Give Me Your Money", starts in a beautifully lush way as it builds to a crescendo of defiant strength. "Step on the gas and wipe that tear away," he tells us. Where are they going?

The chorus (counting off to seven and ending with "All good children go to heaven") hints at a rather ominous conclusion. Abbey Road is not, however, dominated by McCartney. George Harrison's contributions, "Here Comes the Sun" and "Something" are outliers in that they are really nothing like what he would release in early 1970 on his legendary triple-LP solo album All Things Must Pass. The former is a Beatles-type song, a celebration of life and happiness that seems like a cousin to McCartney's Beatle song "Good Day Sunshine".

The latter is arguably Harrison's masterpiece, a sweeping romantic ode to a love that is always there, a love earned and embraced. However well regarded Harrison's "Something" was at the time, it can't shine as it's always in the shadow of the Lennon and McCartney standards. (At the time Frank Sinatra famously called "Something", "the greatest love song of the past 50 years", while also mis-identifying it as a product of Lennon and McCartney.)

Ringo Starr's "Octopus's Garden" was and remains an inoffensive, slight ditty that neither adds nor detracts from the overall tone of the album. Sandwiched between McCartney's slow shouter "Oh Darling" and Lennon's extended bluesy riff "I Want You (She's So Heavy)", it's a suitable sibling to "Yellow Submarine". What's surprising and refreshing is how much better "Octopus's Garden" comes off here in a shorter version, less produced version. This version, without the original album's gurgling underwater sound effects, features a tasty guitar lick from Harrison that would have been at home on his 1970 country album Beaucoups of Blues.

This box set reissue is lovingly curated and mixed in stereo 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos by Giles Martin and Sam Okell. Any concerns about revisiting the over-familiar are blown away by this remix work. It's almost as magical as hearing Abbey Road for the first time. Take, for example, the three-way guitar duel between Paul, George, and John as they trade soloing through the second half of "The End". We might have thought of this song as a duel between three guitarists that were squaring off for attention in a spotlight they were about to relinquish for the great unknown of solo careers. But in this new mix, it sounds more like a friendship.

John, Paul, and George were never guitar gods. They always worked to service the song, and the lack of post-1966 live performances as a group meant that the studio versions would stay. But those scorching guitar solos in "The End", (all 2:23 minutes of it) along with Ringo's only drum solo as a Beatle, were the perfect mic drop to an era, to their contemporaries, and the listening world at large. This track was strong half a century ago, and the blessings of a new mix have squeezed even more power from it.

By the time Abbey Road came along, most fans of the era were quick to pick not our favorite songs, but rather our favorite member of the Beatles. Many concluded (with a strong tinge of misogyny) that Lennon was too deep under Yoko Ono's spell to be a team player, but the tracks here sound immediate and urgen. The sweet and gorgeous layering of voices in "Because" and "Sun King" are less blissed-out relics of the era. Still, they're beautiful examples of John's romantic side, how he drew from the sublime beauty produced when he sang three-part harmony with Paul and George. It's a sweet throwback to the beautiful harmony of 1963's "This Boy", and the fact that we'd never again hear this song from Lennon again makes it bittersweet.

Listen to the Trident Recording Session & Reduction Mix of "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" that opens Disc Two. When they're interrupted by noise complaints from neighbors, John turns down the volume after one more take and a declaration to the others "Last chance to be loud!" Billy Preston's swirling organ is terrifying, and the track concludes (whereas the album version abruptly stops in mid-note).

Listen to John and Paul perform "The Ballad of John and Yoko", (a B side not included on the album.) They're a duo, but they playfully refer to each other as Ringo and George. Take 5 of John's "Come Together" opens Disc 3 and proves the early versions don't need much changing. The only thing really altered from these Lennon outtakes to the studio version is the ragged raw glory of Lennon's voice, which we would also hear in 1970's primal scream solo debut, John Lennon / Plastic Ono Band.

Paul's efforts were equally divided between songs for the Beatles and gifts given to Apple label recording artists. His home demo of "Goodbye", made popular by Mary Hopkin, is all romantic falsetto and sweet longing. His studio demo of "Come and Get It", given to Badfinger, is the type of power pop that wouldn't see fruition until ten years later when performed by Nick Lowe or Squeeze. McCartney has been saddled with many labels over the years -- schmaltzy and cloying and a pop star more than a true rock renegade -- but his work ethic throughout his career as a Beatle and beyond is amazing and clearly influential for later generations.

History will most likely prove Paul was at his best in Abbey Road. The interplay between his voice and sentiments and John's as they shared songs such as the sad romance of Paul's "Golden Slumbers", or the implicit naughtiness of "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window" mixed with John's strange "Mean Mr. Mustard" and "Polythene Pam", provides a nearly 15-minute suite that closes side two. These songs are perfect testimony to their competitive yet somehow manageable partnership. We'll never know if Lennon might have incorporated those songs into live stadium performances 50 years later, but McCartney's been performing them for years. The joy he experiences recreating "Golden Slumbers", Carry That Weight", and "The End" as his concert finalés is palpable and infectious.

What remains for the legacy of Beatles Incorporated ? Fortunately, Let It Be was already rehabilitated in 2003 as Let It Be…Naked, stripped of the Phil Spector sonic overload of strings and sweetness. The 1970 film, Let It Be, will be revamped and re-released in 2020 for its 50th anniversary and will (one hopes) be seen as it is -- a soundtrack to a movie and a document of a group transitioning to separate lives. The best boxed sets are proof that alternate timelines are alive and well if we're willing to look for them.

No matter how we liked our Beatles, or whom among them we liked best, the Abbey Road Anniversary Super Deluxe proves they were a cohesive unit through to the end. Their work once again sounds fresh and experimental yet always in the pocket of the melody. We can hear that the Beatles were eager to work together one more time to pour more musical flavors into their magic elixir.

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Deltics ()
Date: October 16, 2019 18:48

Beatles Singles Box Set coming 22 November.


"As we say in England, it can get a bit trainspottery"

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Elmo Lewis ()
Date: October 16, 2019 19:29

Paul's solo career gets almost no airplay other than "Band On The Run". Why? Lots of great stuff (yeah, I know, a few clunkers too).

Let Me Roll It, Coming Up, Hi Hi Hi, Getting Closer, This One, etc.

Your thoughts?

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: October 16, 2019 20:05


This would be very nice to have, but it's quite pricey and ultimately probably unnecessary.
Still though, might have to splurge!

I still have the original Strawberry Fields/Penny Lane double A-side from '67 that my dad bought for my brother and I (he bought us all things Beatles!).
Also many other Beatles vinyl singles - including the Free as a Bird and Real Love vinyl singles that were released at the time of Anthology, and some colored vinyl singles of other older Beatles hits released around that time.

Just convinced myself this is a necessary must-have box set - grinning smiley - thanks for the link Deltics!

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: October 16, 2019 20:20

The Beatles - The Singles Collection (7" Vinyl)

See also: [www.SuperDeluxeEdition.com]

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: frankotero ()
Date: October 16, 2019 20:22

I really like original reproductions especially if they're impossible to buy. However this set doesn't seem to have the push out centers and the remastered audio is already available. So far I'm on the fence with this one. Maybe I'll soften up later.

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: Irix ()
Date: October 16, 2019 20:55

Paul McCartney: 'Home Tonight / In A Hurry' - 7" Single (Picture-Disc with new released Tracks):


Record Store Black Friday 29-Nov-2019 -- [RecordStoreDay.com]

Re: Beatles vs Stones - and other Beatles stuff
Posted by: marianna ()
Date: October 16, 2019 23:11

Quote
Elmo Lewis
Paul's solo career gets almost no airplay other than "Band On The Run". Why? Lots of great stuff (yeah, I know, a few clunkers too).

Let Me Roll It, Coming Up, Hi Hi Hi, Getting Closer, This One, etc.

Your thoughts?

His '70s solo career audience is aging out of the prime advertising demographic of 24-49 years old. There is very little '70s music played on radio, and probably not on streaming, either. Put some of the songs in TV ads or movies and younger people might become aware of them.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-10-16 23:11 by marianna.

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