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Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 15:35

Just found two short reviews of the gig at the Gaumont, October 22, 1963.


QUOTE

Also saw The Everly Brothers Show, who were the top of the bill. When they came on the whole Gaumont cinema crowd errupted with "We want the Stones", the Everly Brothers tried to play but where drowned out, in the end they had to bring the Stones on stage to back them with their numbers.
Great show, long live The Stones.

UNQUOTE

Here the reply of another witness:


QUOTE

I don't know where this story came from ..but it's pure fiction...The show was produced by "Don Ardon" and it was called " The Everly Brothers Bo Diddley Show" it came to the Gaumont on Tuesday the 22nd of October 1963 ...The program was compared by "RAY CAMERON" and was as follows..
"The Flintstones", "Micky Most", "The Rolling Stones", "Ray Cameron" "Little Richard", (interval) "The Rattles", "Ray Cameron", "Julie Grant", "Bo Diddley","The Everly Brothers" ...It was a great show as I remember The Everly's were outstanding that night (They were backed by the Crickets)..They played a whole load of their hit's and ended the the show with "Cathy's Clown" to a standing ovation and then came back on stage and did it again for an oncore(it was in the charts for 18 weeks & 7 weeks at #1)...The Rolling Stones were a little known group in 1963 with only one record just in the charts it was a Chuck Berry song called "come on" (It only got to #23) .....On the night they only performed two numbers the first was Chuck Berry's "Talking About You" and followed by their first release ... I thought they were too loud and they didn't go down to well..19 year old Mick Jagger wore a black and white dogtooth jacket and winkle pickers and he looked like a "Mod".....In those days The stones got more attention by bad press than good music.
I got this info from the program and my Diary at the time..I was in the rear circle seat P16..Still got the ticket and program, cost me 8/6

UNQUOTE.


....mmmh! two numbers only?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-10-26 16:05 by straycat58.

Re: Stone in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: NICOS ()
Date: October 26, 2010 15:53

Great reading, there's probably more out there with good stories come on girls open your Diary's

__________________________

Re: Stone in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:03

we asked already in the past here in iorr; if I rememeber there was just one who saw the band in 1963 and another one in the first US tour.
Problem is that most of the people don't remember the songs played.

What comes out is that during the Everly Tour, the band was apparently playing two numbers; I thought a longer set.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-10-26 16:05 by straycat58.

Re: Stone in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: NICOS ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:10

Quote
straycat58
we asked already in the past here in iorr; if I rememeber there was just one who saw the band in 1963 and another one in the first US tour.
Problem is that most of the people don't remember the songs played.

What comes out is that during the Everly Tour, the band was apparently playing two numbers; I thought a longer set.

Yes I remember that, the problem also is that most of them who saw them back in 63 are over 60 or maybe 70 not many of them using the internet.

__________________________

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:20

This one is from EXETER, October 2, 1964


QUOTE -


"I was onstage with the Stones at the Odeon, October 1964.

My friend Paul Walter’s dad Ken was involved with the Odeon & got us both in that night as stagehands. Our job was to take the leading edges of the heavy curtain that would come across between acts and guide it around any mike stands, etc that may be in the way. So, we got to see what the acts saw in the auditorium, - screaming teenagers - but from the safety of being hidden behind these massive curtains. I remember being terrified that I’d do something wrong, like falling into the pit.

I saw the Stones backstage (Brian Jones included) and somewhere at home in Exeter, there’s a box with an autographed programme from that evening. Mick Jagger had Chrissy Shrimpton with him that night - and I also remember Long John Baldry asking the female singer in Shotgun Express or was it Steam Packet, (could have been Beryl Marsden) if she minded if he put his hand on her shoulder during one of the numbers. (I much later realised she’d had nothing to fear from him on that particular front)

An act called Thee Of London (just in case you were wondering) were also on the show. Basically a thrown together let’s-smash-up-our-gear Who copycat routine, they caused some muttering in the wings as the drumkits that they were kicking were shared between most acts.

The best part was this. Those 60’s package tours were a series of short sets, fast turnarounds and an introduction by an old-school compere. That show had a real old Northern ‘take my mother-in-law’ merchant as host. Never heard of him before or after. His spirit lives on in Phoenix Nights.

As I was waiting stage left to guide the curtains back, he quietly came up and asked me if I knew the Stone’s names. So, I told him. He carefully wrote this information on the palm of his hand in biro and a bit later, walked out on stage to say…”Lets have a big hand for Mick, Brian, Bill, Charlie and Keith - The Rolling Stones!!!!” .

I then realised he’d actually had no idea of who they were until he asked me.

Now, if I was the person at 14 that I am now, I’d have said something like, Alf, Timothy, Snotty, Micky & Griff. and taken great pleasure in watching what happened when he read that out onstage. A little bit of pop history could have been created in Exeter on that night.

Another chance that I’d never get again, lost forever.

Seize the day, you youngsters out there."


UNQUOTE -

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:23

December 2 , 1963 - from local newspaper

ROLLING STONES TAKE TAMWORTH BY STORM –
December 2, 1963

Tamworth Assembly Rooms erupted to a crescendo of female screams at 8.52pm on Monday night as the green velvet curtains slid slowly apart to reveal five lads with a pulsating beat streaming from their amplifiers. Five young lads with more hair hanging over their ears and around their shoulders than the Beatles ever had, produced the biggest audience appeal that has ever hit the Assembly Rooms and when you consider the talent which has stepped onto the same stage – The Beatles, The Big Three, The Bachelors, Screaming Lord Sutch, The Bruisers – you have an idea of the impact made by these five talented youngsters from down-south. The crowded hall – more crowded than I have ever seen it before – was a mass moving to a tremendous rhythm which oused[sic.] from the fingers and throats of the Rolling Stones. If there was such a word as ‘class’ in this realm of entertainment, these lads would be one of the groups to be tabbed with the word. They were not just a good group they were fantastic – and the people who lost were those who didn’t go along to see them. They were a thoroughly professional group – none of this semi-professionalism which is so prevalent at the moment – and as well as being knowledgeable musicians they have that uncommon ability of putting it over in a way that creates havoc in the female population. But what was happening before the show back-stage? Bass guitarist Bill Wyman, was quietly sitting in the dressing room engrossed in a science-fiction thriller while blonde rhythm guitarist Brian Jones was simply pounding away on a set of drums, an instrument which he said had always fascinated him. The other three, vocalist, Mick Jagger, lead guitarist Keith Richard; and drummer Charlie Watts paced impatiently up and down making sure everything was in its place. And after the show? The band weren’t given a chance to get away as wave after wave of autograph hunters flocked onto the stage. Well they say ‘a Rolling Stone gathers no moss’ but at least these lads will soon be gathering a following which will be from coast to coast. (Tamworth Herald – Dec.2, 1963)

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:31

Few memories from 1963 December 20 - Winchester


HISTORIANS got some satisfaction following an appeal for memories of a seminal rock gig in Winchester in the 1960s.

Hyde 900’s living history group appealed for people who attended a Rolling Stones concert at The Lido in Worthy Lane to come forward. Among the 23 who got in touch were the Rolling Stones’ support act on December 20, 1963, and a fan that claims Mick Jagger bought him a drink in the Hyde Tavern.
There were also memories of what happened after the concert — which charged a 7s 6d entry charge.
One respondent said she had shared a coffee with the band at a house in Romsey Road! Pete Charman, of Franklin Road, Twyford, said he heard the band had gone into the Hyde Tavern after being thrown out of The Lido’s bar for having long hair!
The 62-year-old described how Mick Jagger came to buy him a half-a-pint of bitter. “He didn’t intend to buy me a drink but it ended up that way,” he said. “I was waiting to get served and he bought Brian Jones a drink and I just got included in the round, I was under-age as it was!” Mr Charman said there was about 1,000 people packed into The Lido, with people three-deep on the balcony, which was bouncing under the weight.
Tony Collier, whose band The Strangers were the support act that night, said: “I remember that we were all in this very small dressing room all together and they [Rolling Stones] were really nice guys, no problems at all. “I can still see Rex Pragnell now [the promoter] — a really smart guy — in his suit and waistcoat, and I think a cigar, pleased as punch that he had pulled off a great coup getting them.” Kathy Farr said she and friend Sue Blair — whose dad was manager of Sheriff & Ward (now Debenhams) — had got chatting to the band after the gig. She said: “We took them back to my place for coffee, but my mother thought they were no good layabouts and threw them out, so we went to Sue’s house for coffee, her parents were in bed. “We sat and talked for a long time drinking coffee,” she added. “We were quite content just to sit and drink coffee and talk.”

Madelaine Key, who is co-ordinating the project for Hyde 900, said: “I’m really pleased with the response, it’s certainly given colour to the event which up to then was just rumour. “It’s lovely to have different memories, from someone’s dad coming to take her home because she was late, to punch-ups.” By the time the Rolling Stones appeared at the Winchester gig they had already enjoyed a couple of chart hits, including a number 12 placing for I Wanna Be Your Man — a Lennon and McCartney cover — the previous month. They have so far released a total of 29 studio albums and 92 singles, not including live sets and compilations.


It was always a great venue for pop groups and many top bands appeared there throughout the Sixties pop explosion and the biggest event was when the Rolling Stones hit town on 20th December 1963 as part of their tour which caused riots wherever they appeared on a par with Beatlemania that was sweeping the country. The Lido was under siege with many girls offering their 'favours' to the stewards in an effort to wangle their way into the already crowded ballroom that had over 1,000 screaming fans baying for the Stones. Tony was also trying to keep the front rows back behind the flimsy cordon and was sitting on the edge of the stage and pushing the girls back whilst Mick and the lads played a blistering set of R&B classics.
For a laugh Tony then jumped up and proceeded to 'play' the grand piano by the wings which gave the Stones a good laugh as everybody thought he was one of the band! The show ended in a mini-riot as the bouncers whisked the Stones offstage and back to dressing room behind the curtains where they allowed a lucky few to pop in for autographs, including Tony who just merrily signed his name as part of the most successful band on the planet! Rex came in and went berserk at his son for daring to gatecrash the show and autograph session but then burst into laughter as he saw the funny side of it, not to mention thoughts of the massive profits on a relatively low fee for the Stones at that time!

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 16:53

The Rolling Stones at Tooting - 12th Jan '64 Granada cinema/theater, South London.


Headlining the bill was The Ronnets. But the act that everybody came to see was a more 'local' group. A group that had two singles enter the charts and had introduced the youth of Britain to Rhythm and Blues. We had tickets for the circle, my mate and I. This was the first concert of any kind that I'd attended. It was one of those multi-act tours of that era. Can't remember precisely who was on the bill. Pretty sure it included The Searchers, Dave Berry, and The Fourmost, maybe The Hollies, and I'm certain there were others I've forgotten. Anyways, it wasn't important then, who else was on, and it's not important now. The Ronnets were a pretty big draw, but the act that filled that theater to over-capacity was of course... ...Freddy and the Dreamers. No, I don't think so. The Rolling Stones were the biggest thing, bigger than The Beatles I'd say, with the 'kids' of London. We didn't want those clean cut Northerners who played music that our mums hummed along to. We wanted... ... bad, loud, rebellious scruffs who played music that our parents hated. We wanted the Stones. Anyways, back to the show. The theater went dark and on stage walked a cheesy comedian, the compare. The acts had about 10 mins. each. They all used the same drum kit. About 5 mins. of Mr. Cheesy betwixt the acts. Then the naff compare took a little longer with his naff jokes, teasing the audience - would he shut up and let on the act that we were all waiting for or not. Finally... There on the stage were The Stones. I think they launched with 'I Wanna Be Your Man' the crowd went berserk, I mean berrrserk. Girls were screaming like you see in old footage of '60's pop shows. Blokes were up on the backs of their seats, some even standing on the wall around the edge of the balcony. You had to get up out your seat else you would not see a thing. The ol' memory fails me. As well as 'I Wanna Be Your Man' I know they played 'Come on', and maybe 'You Better Move On' or some slow one anyway. I'm pretty sure that they also played an up-tempo rocker that they hadn't recorded. About half way through, Mick introduced the band, paying particular attention to Charlie who he forced to get out from behind his drum kit and come to the front of the stage. Their slot on stage was over all too soon. The curtain came down, came across actually, and Mr. Cheesy was back trying to calm everyone down. His threat was that if we didn't settle the main act would not appear. That was not too much of a threat, we were there to see The Rolling Stones, not the Ronettes, and what we wanted was the Stones back out for an encore or three. That did not happen, not really possible with that multi-act kind of a show. Eventually we did settle, and the curtain opened on The Ronettes. The blokes started shouting and whistling at the three shapely females, particularly at Ronnie Ronnet 'cause her short dress rode higher and higher up her ample bum. Then the girls started screaming again... ... Mick Jagger had appeared unexpectedly from the wings and performed a short dance act with Ronnie.


-------------


I have more.. if interested I can find them and post.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-10-26 16:55 by straycat58.

Re: Stone in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: October 26, 2010 17:54

Quote
NICOS
Yes I remember that, the problem also is that most of them who saw them back in 63 are over 60 or maybe 70 not many of them using the internet.

Stewed & Keefed from Rocks Off (ocasionaly posts here as 'King Bee') caught the Stones on their second visit to Rochester, in 63 - and he's under 60 winking smiley

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: October 26, 2010 18:00

Actually, it was their sole visit to Rochester in 1963: Rochester Odeon, 1st November - though they did return in '64 and '65

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: dcba ()
Date: October 26, 2010 18:15

"The show was produced by "Don Ardon"

Could it be Don Arden? Father of Sharon Arden-Osbourne btw... It's a small world!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-10-26 18:20 by dcba.

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: October 26, 2010 18:56

Quote
dcba

Could it be Don Arden? Father of Sharon Arden-Osbourne btw... It's a small world!

Yep, same fella

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: NICOS ()
Date: October 26, 2010 19:11

straycat58
I have more.. if interested I can find them and post.


Yes please.........thanks

__________________________

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: marvpeck ()
Date: October 26, 2010 19:23

Yeah Post /em....you can almost feel the energy

Marv Peck

Y'all remember that rubber legged boy

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 23:16

-22 March 1964 - Ryde Castle - Isle of Wight


Rolling Stones in Ryde -

The rock'n'roll event of 1964 was the visit of the Rolling Stones who played two sold out shows in March at the Ryde Pavilion. The event is recalled with affection by musicians, bouncers and fans, some who managed to squeeze themselves into the Rolling Stone's rooms at the Ryde Castle. "We knew beforehand that the Rolling Stones would be staying at the Castle, about a week before the gig the hotel manager had hung up signs everywhere on the Saturday night or before the Saturday night, before we played, advertising the fact that the Rolling Stones would be staying at his hotel.


Our drummer Pete Channing thought he ought to draw Mick Jagger's attention to this. So he showed the signs to Mick Jagger after the concert and they were checking into the hotel and there was quite a row between him and the hotel manager, particularly the hotel manager's wife. I remember Jagger calling her a 'bloody little hit', because by this time there were girls swarming around the hotel and in fact Keith Richard had already found two in his room before he went in it." - Gary Cowtan, Shamrock's vocalist "My Auntie lives in Kingston. I used to go and see the Rolling Stones at Eel Pie Island when I was twelve. I was always a rebel, but for a cause. When they came to Ryde we met up in the afternoon and drove around in a maroon Ford Cortina they brought over with them." - Suzanne Spurrier, dancer and singer "I had a punishment hanging over my head of not being able to go. I had misbehaved. Fortunately, the day before my parents thought I had suffered enough and relented. I queued up from 5.30am in the morning on the day, there were three of us there. By ten the queue had swelled to several hundred people, politely standing in line. I got what I considered to be the best seat in the house, the middle seat in the front row. Complete elation. I was only twelve but I was really up for it. I stared at Jagger and Richard. Was this really happening?" - Dave Wells "Twelve bouncers were employed for this and we were all instructed to stand at the front. A Stones roadie told us that if anybody left their seat we were to rush towards them and tell them to sit down.In the first performance one person moved and then they all did. We were nearly crushed, and the show stopped after a few songs. As a result the second performance did not run its full course. Mick Jagger played up to the crowd, but the sound was so brilliant and exciting for an Isle of Wight audience who had been alienated up to that time. The Stones made the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. They stayed at the Ryde Castle. Brian Jones climbed the ivy growing on the wall outside." - Frank Orchard, bouncer at the Rolling Stones gig "The gig was run by a Ryde schoolteacher. The Stones were downstairs and came up while we played. They were a bit worried about the audience reaction. The success of our band was responsible for the audience reaction but they were better because they were the Rolling Stones. Certain members of our band didn't perform in the first show, their knees were knocking too much. I went home and got a bottle of vodka. I remember a Beatle's number which we had to play loud. It had a rimshot on the drums which stopped and Charlie Watts smiled as my drumstick went flying past Crann." - Ken Young, Cherokees drummer "It was the first time I had seen a 50 watt amp. I played with a 20 watt amp at the time and Brian used a Vox AC30." - Crann Davies, Cherokees bassist "We got them over to the Castle afterwards in our white van, which was covered in lipstick. It was backed up to the Pavilion, and they were smuggled in. We were drinking with them until quite late." - Dave Eaglen, Shamrocks guitarist "My friend Tessa and I were in the fifth year at Sandown Grammar School. We had tickets for the second show. In between shows there were loads of people out the front of the hotel. Our plan was to sneak into the hotel. We went in the side entrance, that long covered bit to the right of the front. We went up a staircase, it was strange, hotel bedrooms weren't locked in those days. We asumed that they would stay at the front of the hotel. We just tried a door, nobody was there. We looked around and opened a drawer and in it was a photo of a man and a boy, Bill Wyman and his son. We waited in the bedroom. When he cam in he didn?t say anything, he wasn't annoyed. 'Could we meet you after the show to get your autographs?' we asked. 'If you sit at the front I'll give you the nod before we finish,' he said. I seem to remember we sat on just ordinary chairs, they weren't numbered tickets. We managed to get down at the front. The show was brilliant. Just before the last number he gave us the nod. We went back to the room again and they came over shortly afterwards. We went into another room, all the others were three. They were all friendly and chatty except for Charlie Watts who was quiet. They gave us their autographs in pencil. We were talking, and Brian Jones, who was my favourite, said 'Come and have a look at the crowds'. We went into a big bedroom that overlooked the front. As I recall, he had his arm around me. I was in seventh heaven. I was a little bit worried, but fascinated. It wasn't a problem, we didn't feel threatened. I was only sixteen, and flet I was getting a little bit out of my depth. At that point, their manager came in and said 'Come on, you're going out'. We went off in our nylon macs. It gave us a conversation piece for the next few weeks. -

Jackie Ridgway



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2010-10-26 23:16 by straycat58.

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 23:27

August 8 , 1964 , The Hague

The concert of the Stones in the Hague at the Kurhaus,the Hague (which was one of the most fancy hotels back then) was the Stones'first ever concert on the European continent. Opening acts were some dreadfulDutch entertainers, which made the crowd riotous. The show started withWalking The Dog and the crowd started to tear down the hall. Jagger lost hismike lead and played maracas on Hi-Heel Sneakers and Susie Q. The Stonesended with Mona (and not Not Fade Away as Karnbach and Bernson state) beforethe show was cancelled by the police. Never happened something like thisbefore in Holland! Funny enough, the press didn't consider a Stones concert abig thing so didn't send a camera team. Luckily for us now, a young D.J.called Willem van Kooten decided it was important and went to the concert witha camera and a tape recorder. He recorded the complete concert from the sideof the stage and even got to ask Jagger (during Susie Q!) if he had ever seensomething like this. Jagger responded no, and said the police had to take iteasy on the young girls. The tape is of very good quality, all instrumentscan be heard loud and clear. The tape is especially funny if you understandDutch, since the reporter is clearly amazed at the sight of 1000 young kidsfighting!

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 23:38

November 1, 1964 - Long Beach

The Stones played the Long Beach Auditorium 11-1-64, booked there by then-concert promoter Bob Eubanks.

Bob Eubanks: The concert was on a Sunday afternoon, and I arrived at the Auditorium a few hours before show time. The Stones were already in their dressing rooms when I walked in. In the first room was Brian Jones, alone, practicing on his guitar. My first reaction was utter surprise, maybe even dismay. Having bought many acts by then, I was used to clean cut artists like the Righteous Brothers, the Beach Boys or the Beatles.
The Stones were a whole new breed for me. Brian’s brown suit was sweat stained and badly wrinkled and his fingernails were dirty. His hair was also much longer and bushier than the Beatles. In the adjoining room I met the rest of the group and they looked like they had just gotten off work from the local Richfield gas station, having just changed out of their greasy overalls and into greasy jeans and torn jackets.
Like Jones they had very long scruffy hair. I said hello to them as they changed their clothes and couldn’t help but notice their legs had blues from dye that had leeched out of their jeans.
I guess they’d been living in the same clothes for months. In addition to their shabby appearance the band members were indifferent and cold, and their road crew was uncooperative, but I tried to be friendly with all of them.

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 26, 2010 23:40

First OZ Tour - January 1965

Harry M. Miller, promoter:

I had signed the Rolling Stones for the first tour of Australia, but without any large venues in whichto play I was going to look rather foolish. In Sydney we checked out several potential sites, including the open-air White Citytennis stadium, and committed my Pan-Pacific Promotions to spend AUS $40,000 for the conversion of one of the big pavilionsat the Sydney Showground into a concert hall. The place needed a lot of work. We had to build a dressing-room block, run milesof wire for new sound and lighting systems, construct a high central steel stage and knock a hole in the concrete floor to thestorage area underneath to provide a stairway for the artists arriving in the underground car park. The place had a seatingcapacity of 7,500. Of all the pop and rock ’n’ roll concerts I presented none was more exhilarating than that first tour by theRolling Stones, not just because of the obstacles to be overcome but also because the Rolling Stones were so plainly on a rawsurge to the top. We co-starred them with Roy Orbison and the Newbeats, all of this for admission prices of two and a half tothree and a half Australian dollars. I signed the Stones for AUS $12,500 a week (a little less than they now command) for whichthey had to give up to thirteen performances a week, and paid for the accommodations and economy air fares for five Stones andthree managers. Over a three-week tour of Australia and New Zealand it added up to an outlay of almost AUS $100,000, but wegrossed about AUS $250,000 at the box office. Perhaps I was a little mean when I refused to bring their own amplifiers as excessbaggage. They could bring their guitars but that was all I was paying for, is what I told Andrew. ‘We’ve got perfectly goodamplifiers in Australia.’ ‘Christ! Who are we working for – Scrooge?’ he shouted at me down the phone. ‘We’re all workingfor our bank managers, Andrew,’ I told him. ‘And if we don’t keep a lid on the cost this whole thing is going to blow.’

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: NICOS ()
Date: October 26, 2010 23:46

Great straycat58........thanks.........think we should bundle all the '63 '64 stuff in a document............

More more..................

__________________________

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: straycat58 ()
Date: October 27, 2010 10:54

it's all stuff available on the web. I use to cut and paste them 'cause some are curious and naive.
As I said, there's little mention of the band on stage, what they played, how they played, etc.

Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: Carnaby ()
Date: October 27, 2010 17:14


Re: Stones in Sheffield 1963
Posted by: copsnrobbers ()
Date: October 27, 2010 20:29

Quote
straycat58
it's all stuff available on the web. I use to cut and paste them 'cause some are curious and naive.
As I said, there's little mention of the band on stage, what they played, how they played, etc.

Check out Bill Wyman's book for detials



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