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Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: crumbling_mice ()
Date: January 30, 2011 22:28

A song that only really worked played live..73 versions are brilliant and Taylor excels


Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: muffie ()
Date: July 20, 2013 20:37

Quote
ajc68
I always liked the rawer outtake version that's been floating around with the Mick Taylor guitar solo that was cut. Unfortunately, I've never heard a version that doesn't have audio dropouts late in the solo.

Thanks for the heads up. Quite a bit more going on this one. Taylors lead and Keiths rhythm make it almost sound like a country twang track.




Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: tomcasagranda ()
Date: July 20, 2013 23:49

I don't think it's a Sympathy rewrite: I think Mick had been spinning a bit of the Gris Gris era Dr John at home, and decided to come up with it. Mick had also sat in on the Sun, Moon , Herbs album by the good doctor.

I like both the GHS, and Brussels Affair versions: the difference is the keyboard guys on each version; Nicky Hopkins on the studio version, and Billy Preston on the live version.

I don't think it's a parody, but then I think GHS is a fantastic album: I don't think it's a follow-up to Exile On Main Street, but it could pass as a follow-up to Sticky Fingers.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: stonesdan60 ()
Date: July 21, 2013 00:26

GHS was the first album I ever bought when I was an impressionable 13 year old. My older brother had already turned me into a rabid Stones fan and I bought Goat the day it came out. I loved Mr. D and still do. Someone said it's a dance or groove tune that doesn't hit the mark. Maybe the Stones never intended it to be either of those genres. I don't know how to label it. It is what it is. But I still love the riff, the foggy feel of the mix, etc. Might not be a classic but it is underrated in my opinion, as is the rest of GHS, B&B, and IORR.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: LieB ()
Date: July 21, 2013 01:15

Quote
muffie
Quote
ajc68
I always liked the rawer outtake version that's been floating around with the Mick Taylor guitar solo that was cut. Unfortunately, I've never heard a version that doesn't have audio dropouts late in the solo.

Thanks for the heads up. Quite a bit more going on this one. Taylors lead and Keiths rhythm make it almost sound like a country twang track.



Great outtake, better than the master version in many ways. Has more rock 'n' roll energy and spontaneity to it. Jagger's vocals and Mick T's lead guitar is cool. Thanks for the video post!

The song as a whole I think is decent -- I like the sleaze, but I agree it's a rather silly and drags a bit. I do like the mushy production on GHS, though. It's not as good as the previous Jimmy Miller-era albums but it has its own voodooish sound. It's better than IORR, IMHO.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: GOO ()
Date: July 21, 2013 05:01

Great song period

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: slew ()
Date: July 21, 2013 06:17

Looking through some of the old comments on this song and I usually like to read Doxa's opinions but in regards to this song and Goat's Head Soup he could not be more wrong IMO. Dancing is a really good track this slef parody stuff is a load of crap. The song has a great groove and I love the lyrics. As I have stated before GHS is a great record and suffers only because the four albums that preceded it were so good but Goat's Head Soup is a GREAT album in its own right and is not that much of a drop off in fact it's just different from Exile.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: sonomastone ()
Date: July 21, 2013 06:59

The song is campy. Calling it a parody is giving the Stones the benefit of the doubt.
Got a decent groove though.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Date: July 21, 2013 07:16

One of my two very favorite Stones songs. The riff is a killer, the chorus hook always gets stuck in my head and Taylor's guitar playing (and bass playing!) really cooks on this one.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: howled ()
Date: July 21, 2013 07:29

Quote
Doxa
A first sign of the band 'losing it'.

The song tries to reach everywhere, but leads nowhere. It is a 'dance' song: a weak, bored groove.. Tries to have riff or hook a'la 'guess what': a bored, uninspired miss... Tries to lyricwise play with their dangerous past Satanic Majestise/Sympathy For The Devil/JJ Flash-imaginery, and ends up like a sterile, bad Grimm fairytail that only gathers co-shame..

It is also the reason why GOATS HEAD SOAP will always be remained "the album that started the downhill of the 70's"- as an opener it sets the mood for the album, of which it never reaches out.

Summa summarum: (a) to be recorded over-all, and (b) to be released as an important first track, it is a clear indication that the band was really losing its direction and self-judgement. (It is funny when the Stones always get caught so easily when the 'muse' or the 'mind' or the 'heart' is not there. Just like with SATANIC MAJESTIES album before.)

It did okay in 1973 tour, but that was not due to the song, but the hotness of the band.

- Doxa

The Stones started to lose it on Exile.

Mick was more interested in running around Europe than being with the Stones recording Exile and Keith wasn't that motivated either and Exile is full of rambling Blues/Country/Rock fillers that Keith had stockpiled and Mick just banged some lyrics on.

Sticky Fingers is the last great Stones album and a lot of that is from 1969/1970 as well.

1968-1971 is the Stones golden period with Keith's open G influenced songs in their prime and Mick's open G songs as well ie Brown Sugar.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Dancing with Mr D has a Creedence like riff and feel until the chorus sets in.

It's not a great song.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: sonomastone ()
Date: July 21, 2013 09:58

Quote
slew
Looking through some of the old comments on this song and I usually like to read Doxa's opinions but in regards to this song and Goat's Head Soup he could not be more wrong IMO. Dancing is a really good track this slef parody stuff is a load of crap. The song has a great groove and I love the lyrics. As I have stated before GHS is a great record and suffers only because the four albums that preceded it were so good but Goat's Head Soup is a GREAT album in its own right and is not that much of a drop off in fact it's just different from Exile.

i agree with doxa. it's actually one of the only, if not the only, stones albums i have that i can't listen to all the way through (i stopped at steel wheels though...)

i like angie, and coming down again is of course the best track on the album, but the rockers just don't work - they're too self-conscious, they are the stones trying to sound like the stones rather than just being themselves.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: crholmstrom ()
Date: July 21, 2013 12:16

I love this song. The version on Brussels Affair is totally in the groove. The lyrics are really good too.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: Greenblues ()
Date: July 24, 2013 00:59

It has the lukewarm voodoo feel of some exotic James Bond movie setting (Live and Let Die comes to mind). Just like these movies it has not much to offer artistically. In this respect Doxa is right IMO.

I agree that it borders on parody (maybe that's what it was intended to be, really).

That said, it's murky, weary groove is kinda fascinating. It can suck you in like some track from Sly Stone's Another Riot Going on. I can see why somebody might want to do something with such a cool backing track.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2013-07-24 01:02 by Greenblues.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: kish_stoned ()
Date: July 24, 2013 03:31

one of the best track with nice groove and goats head soup is brilliant too.complete cd,no weak tracks.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: kleermaker ()
Date: July 24, 2013 19:38

The 1973 live versions of this song are just great and much better than on the album itself.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: Pietro ()
Date: July 24, 2013 20:21

"Dancing" has a good groove, but the daft lyrics ruin the song. The lyrics turn the song into a cheap B-movie about zombies and dripping rotting flesh and graveyards and the like.

The song has a deep heavy blues riff. It reminds me of "Ventilator Blues" from "Exile."

"Goats Head Soup" would have been better received if Jagger paid more attention to the lyrics on the songs. "Silver Train," for example, has a great groove but doesn't go anywhere with the lyrics. The same with "Star Start" -- superb melody with juvenile lyrics (and obscene ones too, making the song unsuitable for play on the radio).

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: MartinB ()
Date: July 24, 2013 21:29

I have always liked it. Full stop.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Date: July 24, 2013 22:37

studio version stinks

'73 tour versions cook though

stupid lyrics though; jagger pushing the 'satan' envelope of BS a bit too far here

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Date: July 25, 2013 01:39

Quote
sonomastone
Quote
slew
Looking through some of the old comments on this song and I usually like to read Doxa's opinions but in regards to this song and Goat's Head Soup he could not be more wrong IMO. Dancing is a really good track this slef parody stuff is a load of crap. The song has a great groove and I love the lyrics. As I have stated before GHS is a great record and suffers only because the four albums that preceded it were so good but Goat's Head Soup is a GREAT album in its own right and is not that much of a drop off in fact it's just different from Exile.

i agree with doxa. it's actually one of the only, if not the only, stones albums i have that i can't listen to all the way through (i stopped at steel wheels though...)

i like angie, and coming down again is of course the best track on the album, but the rockers just don't work - they're too self-conscious, they are the stones trying to sound like the stones rather than just being themselves.

Couldn't disagree more with these comments. The rockers don't sound phoned in at all; in fact, NOTHING they had done up to this point sounded remotely like "Dancing With Mr. D," one of their most unique rockers, period, as nothing has really sounded like it since, either. "Silver Train" wouldn't be out of place on side 4 of Exile and "Star Star" is campy fun, but then again, so is half (if not more!) of Some Girls so who says it was too soon to inject their/Mick's sense of humor into the mix? Song's great. Opinions are entirely subjective of course, but for me the first "Stones trying to sound like the Stones" song is, quite blatantly, "If You Can't Rock Me." Even though I actually like that song, it sounds quite ridiculous--it's singing about the band being on stage, it's kinda just singing about their rock lifestyle in general. "D" wasn't either a rewrite of "Sympathy" or a "pushing the 'satan' envelope BS" bit of songcraft as Pink Floyd The Barber asserts after these comments; the "d" stands for drugs, not death. No groove or riff Keith had written up to that point sounded *that* thoroughly soaked in heroin and honestly no other album up to or after this point did, either. It's a very midtempo album and therefore not everyone's cup of tea but I 110% disagree that it was a dramatic drop-off in quality after the so-called classic 4 (they should be called the classic 5 and include this one--the ENTIRE Jimmy Miller run is the best!), it was just a bold stylistic shift. Quite a different mood than Exile, but then again, Exile was quite different from Sticky Fingers. GHS and "D" are tops for me.

As for the Steel Wheels aside, weird one to stop with since the follow-ups were all better. Even then, all four of those so-called Vegas-era records aren't worth mentioning alongside their classic 1963-81 material.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: bam ()
Date: September 16, 2017 21:02

I thought it was time to bring this thread back.

I agree with doxa. When it came out, this song struck me as an unintentional self-parody. It was the start of the slide from the years when every album was "relevant" -- capturing and leading the mood of the moment.

All these years later, and after hearing the new live videos, my view hasn't changed.

Others will differ -- and I'm curious what people think.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: 1962 ()
Date: September 16, 2017 21:05

Always liked it, great groove, great riff, great Mick vocal.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: retired_dog ()
Date: September 16, 2017 21:24

Quote
tomcasagranda
I don't think it's a Sympathy rewrite: I think Mick had been spinning a bit of the Gris Gris era Dr John at home, and decided to come up with it. Mick had also sat in on the Sun, Moon , Herbs album by the good doctor.

I like both the GHS, and Brussels Affair versions: the difference is the keyboard guys on each version; Nicky Hopkins on the studio version, and Billy Preston on the live version.

I don't think it's a parody, but then I think GHS is a fantastic album: I don't think it's a follow-up to Exile On Main Street, but it could pass as a follow-up to Sticky Fingers.

Good observation, that's how I think of GHS, too. All myths aside, Exile is basically a "cleaning the decks" album, not unlike Tattoo You, using songs that were around in various states of completion since 1969, mixed with a good portion of all-new songs.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: Doxa ()
Date: September 16, 2017 21:31

Quote
Doxa
A first sign of the band 'losing it'.

The song tries to reach everywhere, but leads nowhere. It is a 'dance' song: a weak, bored groove.. Tries to have riff or hook a'la 'guess what': a bored, uninspired miss... Tries to lyricwise play with their dangerous past Satanic Majestise/Sympathy For The Devil/JJ Flash-imaginery, and ends up like a sterile, bad Grimm fairytail that only gathers co-shame..

It is also the reason why GOATS HEAD SOAP will always be remained "the album that started the downhill of the 70's"- as an opener it sets the mood for the album, of which it never reaches out.

Summa summarum: (a) to be recorded over-all, and (b) to be released as an important first track, it is a clear indication that the band was really losing its direction and self-judgement. (It is funny when the Stones always get caught so easily when the 'muse' or the 'mind' or the 'heart' is not there. Just like with SATANIC MAJESTIES album before.)

It did okay in 1973 tour, but that was not due to the song, but the hotness of the band.

- Doxa

Haha... funny to read how serious about this band and of their music I was some 8 years ago... Criticism here goes over the top me thinks now - it's not that bad... Besides, it is SOUP not SOAP...grinning smiley

Nice that they have discovered this rather forgotten old song and decided to play it live again.

- Doxa

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: exhpart ()
Date: September 16, 2017 21:43

I like it ...its only rock n roll
Seriously the first track of my first rolling stones album how can I not like it?

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: potus43 ()
Date: September 16, 2017 22:15

Quote
Doxa
A first sign of the band 'losing it'.

The song tries to reach everywhere, but leads nowhere. It is a 'dance' song: a weak, bored groove.. Tries to have riff or hook a'la 'guess what': a bored, uninspired miss... Tries to lyricwise play with their dangerous past Satanic Majestise/Sympathy For The Devil/JJ Flash-imaginery, and ends up like a sterile, bad Grimm fairytail that only gathers co-shame..

It is also the reason why GOATS HEAD SOAP will always be remained "the album that started the downhill of the 70's"- as an opener it sets the mood for the album, of which it never reaches out.

Summa summarum: (a) to be recorded over-all, and (b) to be released as an important first track, it is a clear indication that the band was really losing its direction and self-judgement. (It is funny when the Stones always get caught so easily when the 'muse' or the 'mind' or the 'heart' is not there. Just like with SATANIC MAJESTIES album before.)

It did okay in 1973 tour, but that was not due to the song, but the hotness of the band.

- Doxa

One of their best. Especially live

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: Hairball ()
Date: September 16, 2017 22:23

I always loved the studio version as well as all '73 live versions with Mick Taylor.
Not so sure about the new live versions in comparison to those, but glad they're playing it anyways and brought it back from the dead. thumbs up

edit: oops spoke too soon - they neglected to play it tonight in Spielberg...thought it might be this tours mainstay...hope it's not buried again forever...

--------------------------------
"Rip this joint, gonna save your soul..."




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-09-16 22:54 by Hairball.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: RipThisBone ()
Date: September 17, 2017 04:04

video: [youtu.be]

What a great opening song this is/could be in 2017.

Shame Mick got out time/beat during the last verse in Hamburg, he even apologizes for it.

Ronnie is doing great on slide at the end (first time Mr. Wood played it LIVE mind you).

A little more and.......

AMSTERDAM sept. 30, 2017 setlist could be:

1. DANCING WITH MR. D.
2. SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL
3. IT'S ONLY ROCK'N'ROLL
4. JUST YOUR FOOL
5. RIDE 'EM ON DOWN
6. MISS YOU
7. WILD HORSES
8. UNDER MY THUMB

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: RipThisBone ()
Date: September 17, 2017 04:31

video: [youtu.be]

Few days later in Munich. Great LIVE version.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: StoneTony ()
Date: September 17, 2017 04:51

Quote
CanYouHearTheMusic
Quote
sonomastone
Quote
slew
Looking through some of the old comments on this song and I usually like to read Doxa's opinions but in regards to this song and Goat's Head Soup he could not be more wrong IMO. Dancing is a really good track this slef parody stuff is a load of crap. The song has a great groove and I love the lyrics. As I have stated before GHS is a great record and suffers only because the four albums that preceded it were so good but Goat's Head Soup is a GREAT album in its own right and is not that much of a drop off in fact it's just different from Exile.

i agree with doxa. it's actually one of the only, if not the only, stones albums i have that i can't listen to all the way through (i stopped at steel wheels though...)

i like angie, and coming down again is of course the best track on the album, but the rockers just don't work - they're too self-conscious, they are the stones trying to sound like the stones rather than just being themselves.

Couldn't disagree more with these comments. The rockers don't sound phoned in at all; in fact, NOTHING they had done up to this point sounded remotely like "Dancing With Mr. D," one of their most unique rockers, period, as nothing has really sounded like it since, either. "Silver Train" wouldn't be out of place on side 4 of Exile and "Star Star" is campy fun, but then again, so is half (if not more!) of Some Girls so who says it was too soon to inject their/Mick's sense of humor into the mix? Song's great. Opinions are entirely subjective of course, but for me the first "Stones trying to sound like the Stones" song is, quite blatantly, "If You Can't Rock Me." Even though I actually like that song, it sounds quite ridiculous--it's singing about the band being on stage, it's kinda just singing about their rock lifestyle in general. "D" wasn't either a rewrite of "Sympathy" or a "pushing the 'satan' envelope BS" bit of songcraft as Pink Floyd The Barber asserts after these comments; the "d" stands for drugs, not death. No groove or riff Keith had written up to that point sounded *that* thoroughly soaked in heroin and honestly no other album up to or after this point did, either. It's a very midtempo album and therefore not everyone's cup of tea but I 110% disagree that it was a dramatic drop-off in quality after the so-called classic 4 (they should be called the classic 5 and include this one--the ENTIRE Jimmy Miller run is the best!), it was just a bold stylistic shift. Quite a different mood than Exile, but then again, Exile was quite different from Sticky Fingers. GHS and "D" are tops for me.

As for the Steel Wheels aside, weird one to stop with since the follow-ups were all better. Even then, all four of those so-called Vegas-era records aren't worth mentioning alongside their classic 1963-81 material.

Re: Track Talk: Dancing With Mr. D
Posted by: StoneTony ()
Date: September 17, 2017 05:09

A reading of the lyrics cleary indicates that Mr. D (and Mrs.)is Death. Coming Down Again is obviously about heroin. But everything isn't it. The voodoo-ish lyrics might be influenced by the fact that they were in Jamaica when they recorded it.

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